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Bartmanhomer
02 Feb 2021, 09:08
Happy Groundhog Day everyone. :)

Juniper
02 Feb 2021, 19:16
I didn't pay attention... did he see his shadow or no?

Hawkfeathers
02 Feb 2021, 19:57
I didn't pay attention... did he see his shadow or no?

Yes, 6 more weeks of winter. Someone needs to smack that little rat upside the head! ;)

Bartmanhomer
03 Feb 2021, 05:51
Yes, 6 more weeks of winter. Someone needs to smack that little rat upside the head! ;)

I don't understand how a rodent can predict the season by its shadow. :confused:

B. de Corbin
03 Feb 2021, 06:33
I don't understand how a rodent can predict the season by its shadow. :confused:

Ah...

You know rodents. Their teeth twitch in cold weather.

Bartmanhomer
03 Feb 2021, 07:06
Ah...

You know rodents. Their teeth twitch in cold weather.

That still doesn't explain how a groundhog predicts a season with its shadow.

anunitu
03 Feb 2021, 18:26
same way daylight savings can make a rug longer by cutting a piece off the end and sewing it on the other end thus making the rug longer simple no?

B. de Corbin
04 Feb 2021, 07:11
That still doesn't explain how a groundhog predicts a season with its shadow.

The shadow thing is a myth.

To predict the weather, you have to look closely at the teeth, and count the chatters-per-second. This worked fine until the late 1950s with the invention of television. When the teeth-chatter count was filmed for television, the producers were afraid it would frighten children.

They decided to do the chatter-count privately and, on film, pretend it was all about shadow-seeing.

Now, nobody remembers the real history of this tradition.

- - - Updated - - -


That still doesn't explain how a groundhog predicts a season with its shadow.

The shadow thing is a myth.

To predict the weather, you have to look closely at the teeth, and count the chatters-per-second. This worked fine until the late 1950s with the invention of television. When the teeth-chatter count was filmed for television, the producers were afraid it would frighten children.

They decided to do the chatter-count privately and, on film, pretend it was all about shadow-seeing.

Now, nobody remembers the real history of this tradition.

monsno_leedra
04 Feb 2021, 14:22
The shadow thing is a myth.

To predict the weather, you have to look closely at the teeth, and count the chatters-per-second. This worked fine until the late 1950s with the invention of television. When the teeth-chatter count was filmed for television, the producers were afraid it would frighten children.

They decided to do the chatter-count privately and, on film, pretend it was all about shadow-seeing.

Now, nobody remembers the real history of this tradition.

- - - Updated - - -



The shadow thing is a myth.

To predict the weather, you have to look closely at the teeth, and count the chatters-per-second. This worked fine until the late 1950s with the invention of television. When the teeth-chatter count was filmed for television, the producers were afraid it would frighten children.

They decided to do the chatter-count privately and, on film, pretend it was all about shadow-seeing.

Now, nobody remembers the real history of this tradition.

Now that is something I didn't know. Personally I like the Jack Frost story line better though he he he

B. de Corbin
04 Feb 2021, 17:07
We live in the post reality age.

Anything you can say with a straight face is true for the rabble.

Rick
04 Feb 2021, 18:43
That still doesn't explain how a groundhog predicts a season with its shadow.

Um, Feb 2 is approximately 6 weeks after winter solstice and 6 weeks before the vernal equinox, ergo, shadow or not, there's still 6 weeks til spring.

I eat sausage on Ground Hog day, myself...

Juniper
05 Feb 2021, 19:45
The shadow thing is a myth.

To predict the weather, you have to look closely at the teeth, and count the chatters-per-second. This worked fine until the late 1950s with the invention of television. When the teeth-chatter count was filmed for television, the producers were afraid it would frighten children.

They decided to do the chatter-count privately and, on film, pretend it was all about shadow-seeing.

Now, nobody remembers the real history of this tradition.
Is it bad that I didn't even know about any of this until I saw the film Groundhog Day with Bill Murray?

B. de Corbin
06 Feb 2021, 19:28
Is it bad that I didn't even know about any of this until I saw the film Groundhog Day with Bill Murray?

Nah.. No.

GHD isn't a bling holiday.

You buy nobody nothing, nobody buys you nothing, nobody decorates their front yard with a tableau of wise men going to visit the ground hog with gifts of frankincense and myrrh, and the childers sleep easily at night with dreams of standard cartoony adventures involving psychotic cats and stoopid dogs.

All the ground hog has is Bill Murray.

No shame in that...

anunitu
06 Feb 2021, 19:47
i always knew about it because it is my sisters birthday

monsno_leedra
07 Feb 2021, 01:45
Nah.. No.

GHD isn't a bling holiday.

You buy nobody nothing, nobody buys you nothing, nobody decorates their front yard with a tableau of wise men going to visit the ground hog with gifts of frankincense and myrrh, and the childers sleep easily at night with dreams of standard cartoony adventures involving psychotic cats and stoopid dogs.

All the ground hog has is Bill Murray.

No shame in that...

Well the Ground Hog has a small role in the Jack Frost cartoon. He sort of narrates the cartoon for a bit then old man winter says the ground hog tells him when his time is up.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9Sjd7xbU3Y

Rhythm
10 Feb 2021, 19:34
The thing I love about groundhog day..is that it hits at a monotonous and dreary part of the year. A part of the year where any one day looks like the next and the last before that. In order to explain our common experience of this profundity of regional weather, we invent a superstition which states that a rat is in some way accountable for the end (or continuance) of this state of affairs.

That's just...chef's kiss.

When anyone begins to suggest that we're not good at superstition, that we get it wrong (said one or one million ways) - I point them this way.