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View Full Version : What can I do with....? The food waste reduction thread.



Jembru
04 Aug 2015, 10:12
Thanks to John Oliver I'm now a bit paranoid about food waste. I've noticed JP and I waste a lot more than I imagined we did. It's often that I simply can't think of anything to do with the food item, especially if the recipe I'd bought it for is time consuming and I'm working back-to-back shifts.

Tonight I rescued a few remnants of peppers and mushrooms that weren't fit for salads, and made a nice quorn chili for me, and a prawn pasta bake for JP. I had to throw out some mixed salad leaves and a quarter bag of spinach that hadn't just gone rotten, it was turning to liquid (it was too late even to give to my mum's guinea pigs).

So that no more salad need die unnecessarily, I thought I'd start a thread where we can post what we have lying in the salad crisper, or in the back of our cupboards, that needs to be used up. So our more kitchen-savvy members might come up with ideas.

So my food items this time are;

Half a good sized beetroot (still in very good shape). I usually roast it, but I don't like all my other veg turning red, so I don't use much, meaning it often ends up in the bin.

Cos lettuce, starting to brown in places so probably too bitter for salad, but maybe there's something I can do?

Thanks in advance.

B. de Corbin
04 Aug 2015, 10:45
Slice and boil the beet root, then you can freeze it, or put it in a jar with vinegar and eat it later, or put it on a sammi, or cut it up and put it in salad.

P.S. Save the beet boil water. When it cools, drink it - it's full of vitamins, and it will make you poop red the next day. A great party trick.

If you cut out the big central vein in the lettuce (romaine, to us in the US), the rest won't be bitter.

thalassa
04 Aug 2015, 10:52
YOU NEED WORMS!!
(http://compost.css.cornell.edu/worms/basics.html)

B. de Corbin
04 Aug 2015, 10:55
YOU NEED WORMS!!
(http://compost.css.cornell.edu/worms/basics.html)

One can only hope that you are referring to earth worms, not intestinal parasites...

:rolleyes:

Jembru
04 Aug 2015, 11:19
Slice and boil the beet root, then you can freeze it, or put it in a jar with vinegar and eat it later, or put it on a sammi, or cut it up and put it in salad.

P.S. Save the beet boil water. When it cools, drink it - it's full of vitamins, and it will make you poop red the next day. A great party trick.

If you cut out the big central vein in the lettuce (romaine, to us in the US), the rest won't be bitter.

Wow.. that's a really good tip about the beetroot water! I actually do something similar with rice water; I don't over rinse my rice, because apparently the stuff you wash off is actually full of vitamins, but the water I do rinse with, I keep to one side and wash my face with it. I'm a ginger so look better with pale skin, and they use rice water as a natural skin-whitener in East Asia.

I'll get that beetroot boiled up at once!

Also, great tip about the lettuce too. I assume that works for any lettuce, right? And finally I understand why I can rarely find romaine lettuce when a recipe calls for it!


YOU NEED WORMS!!
(http://compost.css.cornell.edu/worms/basics.html)

I don't have much of a garden (just a few plants in pots), so composting was never much of an option for me. I never thought to just keep worms for the sake of it though. I even had a worm farm as a kid, so this could be a fun project. It might make up for my disappointment at not being able to find stick insects (I had them as a kid, so I know they're easy to breed, and yet can't find anyone who has them and could spare a few little eggs for me :( ).

Thanks for the awesome tips. Ill be sure to return next time something is on it's last legs!

Willow
04 Aug 2015, 16:26
I'm going to offer up a few limes to this list of food needing a purpose.

This is actually an awesome idea for a thread. My live-in is freakishly wasteful (I think she buys things just for the sake of having them clutter up the house). Anyway, she buys food, uses about 1/10th of it and waits for the rest of it to rot into oblivion and thus require a fridge decontamination before she mentions that she has food in the fridge we can eat ourselves. And generally these things rarely constitute a dish in themselves with any of the recipes I've ever come across or used.

So yes, limes. About 3 of them.
Also, this thing I can only assume is a turnip?

B. de Corbin
04 Aug 2015, 16:59
Limes: squeeze out the juice, put it in a ziplock bag, and freeze it.

Turnip: boil, chop, and freeze. Defrost when you have other stuff together to make soup or stew. Or hollow it out and make a jack-o-lantern.

thalassa
04 Aug 2015, 17:15
So yes, limes. About 3 of them.
Also, this thing I can only assume is a turnip?


I cut up limes and freeze the wedges, then add them to ice water. Or to iced mint or green tea...or iced mint and green tea. Or beer.

As for turnips....I don't do those.



Also--I freeze spinach, kale, parsley, etc that is about to go bad (assuming I've not eaten it all up) and use it in smoothies (parley makes an awesome green smoothie), mashed potatoes (colcannon), or rice.

Willow
04 Aug 2015, 17:19
Hmm thanks! ^^

Hawkfeathers
04 Aug 2015, 19:21
Rinse & dry a whole lemon. Wrap in plastic wrap, then foil. Freeze. With a small cheese grater, grate some onto whatever you want it for, while still frozen, then put it back in the freezer, and you can do this repeatedly through the whole lemon, peel/fruit/seeds/it's all good. I'm single and this is perfect for me for when I cook a piece of fish, etc. I've been on the same lemon for a couple of months now.

Tylluan Penry
05 Aug 2015, 01:03
Turnips/swedes. Great roasted in with roast potatoes and sprinkled with herbs and sea salt. Carrots are good like that too.

Bread - makes stuffing, bread cake, bread pudding.

Milk that's gone off - curd cheese. Add a bit of salt to it and hang up in a muslin bag until all the liquid has dripped out (yes, I really do this!) and then add fresh chopped chives.
My son-in-law makes panaar like this but adds lemon juice instead of salt.

Rae'ya
06 Aug 2015, 05:03
Limes... lime curd! Though curd is not exactly a beginners recipe. Also... margaritas! Or anything Thai. Or Mexican. I would basically kill for a surplus of fresh limes... four of my favourite food groups use limes... citrus desserts, margaritas, Thai and Mexican. Yum yum yum.

Turnips are only really good for soup. If it's actually a swede (aka routabaga) then boiled and mashed as a substitute for mashed potato is good. As a general rule turnips have white flesh while swedes have yellow flesh. I think you can also roast em up for neeps and tatties but we'll have to confirm that with someone Irish!

Beetroot doesn't last long in this house. Roast it in a different pan was the first thing I thought of! Mum boils, slices then preserves her extra beets in vinegar for year-round access to salad and burger ready beetroot.

- - - Updated - - -

Oh and Cos lettuce... feed it to your ducks? That's what would happen in my house. Jemima and Baby Duck would appreciate it FAR more than anyone else under my roof!

anunitu
06 Aug 2015, 07:01
In all this,we see Russia destroying food.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/08/06/world/europe/ap-eu-russia-sanctions.html

And this happening while locusts are in southern Russia.
http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/04/europe/russia-locust-swarms/

I think Putin may have slipped off the freaking toast completely.

Jembru
12 Sep 2015, 15:29
I just thought I'd swing by with an update of how all this food waste avoidance is going (with some requests at the end).

I'm still sometimes leaving it too long to use up fresh produce, especially with salad, but I'm much more conscious of what I throw out, and it really encourages me to use everything up. I buy bags of mixed leaves now, rather than various whole lettuces. It costs a little more, but if half my lettuces would just end up in the bin, I'd just be throwing money away anyway. Yet these bags of leaves don't seem to last as long, so I'm still finding that they're going mushy before I've finished the bag. The guilt kills me each time too.

Today I had 2 near misses (and one ends in quite a gross story, yet illustrates how much this food waste issue has touched me). I eat kiwifruit before bed because it's apparently good for sleep (actually, as this guy (https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=203&v=UrefqtuX2os) explains, it most likely isn't anything specific to just kiwifruit, but as one of my favourite varieties of fruit, and the fact I need to eat them for the omega I figured why not), and the one I picked out this morning felt a bit squishy and looked past its best. I don't like dry kiwis, so it ended up staying on my bedside cabinet, uneaten. When I got up tonight, I went to throw it in the bin, but just as I was about to let go, my conscience told me to at least cut it open. I did so, and there was absolutely nothing wrong with it! Tasted just fine too.

Then an hour later, I needed to make my evening meal. I had some ready mixed stir-fry vegetables that were about a week past their sell-by, so I thought I'd use that up. It was starting to go bad; you know, that smell of onion as its starting to turn to mush. Some of the carrots were a bit dry and pale, and the leaves of the bean spouts were definitely on the browner side of green. Still, I thought I'd get it cooked and see how it turns out. I threw the rest in the bin, figuring it won't last another night.

It turned out to be one of the tastiest stir fries I've made in a while! So, erm.. this is when it gets gross... I decided to take the bag out of the bin >.<" It was sealed though! I rinsed the bag under the hot tap and then carefully cut it open so the contents didn't touch the outside, then transferred the smelly, slightly gooey mixture to a fresh bag! Don't judge me!!

Anyway, does anyone know what I can do with satsumas that are dry inside? Sometimes the local shop sells pretty poor quality ones that are dry from the day you get them home. JP especially won't eat them like this, and I prefer not to. Is there anything they're good for at this point?

Also, is there anything fancy I can do with runner beans besides just chopping and boiling or roasting them? I got a huge bag out of my dad's garden and JP won't eat them in case he's allergic (garden peas make his tongue and lips swell so he's nervous of any green legume). I make roast veg maybe twice a week, but as I'm the only one who'll eat it, I've still got loads left and they'll go off soon. I'd especially like to try making them into something I can snack on if that's possible?

faye_cat
12 Sep 2015, 17:21
Jembru, I don't have any recipes, but have you considered getting a sealer? We have something similar to this: http://www.amazon.com/Seal-a-Meal-FSSMSL0160-000-Vacuum-Sealer/dp/B008HMWC4A/ref=sr_1_3?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1442106599&sr=1-3&keywords=vacuum+sealer+food+saver and we use it all the time. It takes a bit of prep time, but we'll go to the grocery store and then come back and prep the food. For the lettuce, we'll wash it, sometimes premix items like cheese or what not, and then seal it and put it in the fridge. We'll also prep apples (wash and cut) and seal. We'll freeze the meats in this bag and not the store packaging, because it always seemed to go bad if we did.

kalynraye
12 Sep 2015, 22:12
Jem with your satsumas make marmalade!!!!! Slice those bad boys up peel and all and in a pot add white wine and sugar (make a simple syrup) and through those bad boys in and cook till they are broken down. Cool and through in a jar.

With your runner beans why don't you add them to your stir fry? Or pickle them. KP loves picked beans and I've got a recipe if your interested.

Tylluan Penry
12 Sep 2015, 23:13
If carrots seem a bit dry, add a small spoonful of sugar to the water when you boil them, and serve with a knob of butter (again a small one) and some chopped basil. Magic!

To liven up boiled potatoes, add some mint to the water when you boil them.

Jembru
12 Sep 2015, 23:34
Wow, great ideas! And yes please Kalynraye, I love pickles so I'm very much interested in your recipe if it's not too much trouble.

kalynraye
13 Sep 2015, 00:06
Good lord I should proof read before I submit... well forgive my mind because it was wondering, and I've put the wrong word in. Oh well, Jem I will get that recipe for, I'll have to dig but I'll have it for you no later then tomorrow!!

Rae'ya
13 Sep 2015, 02:08
I just thought I'd swing by with an update of how all this food waste avoidance is going (with some requests at the end).

I'm still sometimes leaving it too long to use up fresh produce, especially with salad, but I'm much more conscious of what I throw out, and it really encourages me to use everything up. I buy bags of mixed leaves now, rather than various whole lettuces. It costs a little more, but if half my lettuces would just end up in the bin, I'd just be throwing money away anyway. Yet these bags of leaves don't seem to last as long, so I'm still finding that they're going mushy before I've finished the bag. The guilt kills me each time too.

Today I had 2 near misses (and one ends in quite a gross story, yet illustrates how much this food waste issue has touched me). I eat kiwifruit before bed because it's apparently good for sleep (actually, as this guy (https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=203&v=UrefqtuX2os) explains, it most likely isn't anything specific to just kiwifruit, but as one of my favourite varieties of fruit, and the fact I need to eat them for the omega I figured why not), and the one I picked out this morning felt a bit squishy and looked past its best. I don't like dry kiwis, so it ended up staying on my bedside cabinet, uneaten. When I got up tonight, I went to throw it in the bin, but just as I was about to let go, my conscience told me to at least cut it open. I did so, and there was absolutely nothing wrong with it! Tasted just fine too.

Then an hour later, I needed to make my evening meal. I had some ready mixed stir-fry vegetables that were about a week past their sell-by, so I thought I'd use that up. It was starting to go bad; you know, that smell of onion as its starting to turn to mush. Some of the carrots were a bit dry and pale, and the leaves of the bean spouts were definitely on the browner side of green. Still, I thought I'd get it cooked and see how it turns out. I threw the rest in the bin, figuring it won't last another night.

It turned out to be one of the tastiest stir fries I've made in a while! So, erm.. this is when it gets gross... I decided to take the bag out of the bin >.<" It was sealed though! I rinsed the bag under the hot tap and then carefully cut it open so the contents didn't touch the outside, then transferred the smelly, slightly gooey mixture to a fresh bag! Don't judge me!!

Anyway, does anyone know what I can do with satsumas that are dry inside? Sometimes the local shop sells pretty poor quality ones that are dry from the day you get them home. JP especially won't eat them like this, and I prefer not to. Is there anything they're good for at this point?

Also, is there anything fancy I can do with runner beans besides just chopping and boiling or roasting them? I got a huge bag out of my dad's garden and JP won't eat them in case he's allergic (garden peas make his tongue and lips swell so he's nervous of any green legume). I make roast veg maybe twice a week, but as I'm the only one who'll eat it, I've still got loads left and they'll go off soon. I'd especially like to try making them into something I can snack on if that's possible?

Transfer your mixed salad leaves into a vegetable container in the fridge... they last WAAAY longer than if left in the bag. In the bag I swear they go slimy in 3-4 days, but in a veg container they last like 2 weeks.

On that note, vegetable containers are AWESOME. I never leave veg in their bags, but have a number of Tupperware brand FridgeMates to put veg in. They easily last 2-3 times longer and it means I can use the whole fridge instead of just the crisper drawer (I actually keep condiments in the crisper drwaer lol). Just tip out the water that collects in the bottom of the container once a week.

Kiwis... DON'T throw the softies away! They are still good, just a bit mushy.

Beans... chop 'em up, blanch and freeze. I don't have any recipes but I know they keep well in the freezer for a little whilr. They are much nicer fresh but at least it'll save the extras being chucked in the bin.

Azvanna
13 Sep 2015, 02:20
You guys are full of such great ideas.

I have the Tupperware fridgemates as well. They are expensive, but I think they're worth it.

Tonight I froze my blueberries instead of chucking them out. They'll be ready to make a compote or muffins with another day.

Jembru
13 Sep 2015, 10:31
Great idea Azvanna! I asked JP to pick up some blackberries yesterday and he brought home blueberries.. I'm not so keen on them. They have a weird grainy texture to me. So I think I'll freeze most of them too so I can make some kind of dessert with them over the winter! They'd have headed bin-wards for sure otherwise.

kalynraye
13 Sep 2015, 21:18
Make crisps with those beauties!!!! Or once again jam. Dump them in a pot with a heft scoop of sugar and port and cook until they have broken down. Make a slurry with water and cornstarch and add in thicken. We make tons of jams at work with our berries that are past their prime. Alright I had to do some digging cause KP likes to hide his prize recipes.

This recipe can be used for beans or okra

Ingredients

Beans 2 pounds
small dried chiles split in 1/2 4
mustard seed 2 teaspoons
fresh dill sprigs 12
whole garlic cloves 4
whole peppercorns 1 teaspoon
kosher salt 1/4 cup
rice wine vinegar 2 cups
bottled water 2 cups
sterilized pint-sized jars 4

Clean and trim beans to 1/2 pieces, Place 1 chile, 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds, 3 sprigs of dill, 1 clove of garlic and 1/4 teaspoon of peppercorns in the bottom of each of the jars. Then divided the beans evenly between the jars standing them up vertically.

In a medium sauce pan over medium heat bring salt, vinegar and water to a boil. Once boiling pour the mixture over the beans leaving space between the the top of the liquid and the lid. Seal the lids and set in a cool place for 2 weeks

thalassa
14 Sep 2015, 10:43
I freeze greens for smoothies before they go bad...say I've made my salad and have some leftovers, and know they will probably be funky the next day or so, pop 'em in the freezer.

DanieMarie
14 Sep 2015, 11:21
I love this thread! I find that reducing food waste is a learning process. I'll share some of the things I've learned below, but I have to admit that I'm still learning myself. I still waste more than I'd like....

Anyway, stuff I've learned:

-I freeze things just when I think they might go off. These things include cheese, bread, and most fruits or veggies. Most of it isn't good fresh after being frozen, but they're good for cooked dishes.
-Food storage makes a big difference. I avoid storing anything with apples, because apples make things go off. Same with bananas. I try to keep foods relatively separate in the fridge as well and store them in cloths and paper bags over plastic.
-I shop seasonally. This week I'm also starting a food co-op, which is entirely seasonal (it's produce only and completely seasonal). I plan all of my meals around the produce I have or can get. Part of this is because I also do balcony gardening and foraging and usually have a lot of plums, tomatoes and peppers, so I have to plan my summer meals around those things. It's not the most glamorous way to eat (there's usually lots of the same things for several weeks), but I find that local, seasonal produce tastes so good I end up using it anyway.

If all else fails, it does go in the compost bin. I'm lucky enough to live in a city with a compost collection, and we can put anything biodegradable in it. The city uses it to make the biodiesel that runs the waste collection trucks and the byproducts go to farms for fertilizer. Still, I'd rather not waste. It still takes resources to come collect the organic waste from each house.

Anyway, I have some slightly wilting lettuce in the fridge left from the people who were housesitting for us while we were gone. It's decent lettuce, but there is a lot of it. Any tips?

- - - Updated - - -



I'm still sometimes leaving it too long to use up fresh produce, especially with salad, but I'm much more conscious of what I throw out, and it really encourages me to use everything up. I buy bags of mixed leaves now, rather than various whole lettuces. It costs a little more, but if half my lettuces would just end up in the bin, I'd just be throwing money away anyway. Yet these bags of leaves don't seem to last as long, so I'm still finding that they're going mushy before I've finished the bag. The guilt kills me each time too.


Don't buy mixed lettuce! It's usually fairly old and tearing it up like they do makes it go off faster.

My tip would be to just make salads with one or two different kinds of lettuce. If you want to make a mixed salad, use something like rocket, endives or radicchio. Those don't go off as fast as regular lettuce and they add a lot of flavour to salads. Make up for the extra flavour with veggies. Slicing up a few veggies doesn't take long, and they usually add more flavour anyway. I like cucumbers and tomatoes (and always have a lot I have to use), but radishes and carrots last longer in the fridge.

Also, do you have any farm markets that you can get to in your area? The fresher the lettuce, the better it tastes (it actually has a lot of flavour) and the longer it lasts.

Storage also matters. Do NOT store lettuce in plastic. Store it in paper bags or slightly damp dish cloths. Hope that helps!

Jembru
14 Sep 2015, 12:11
I never thought to freeze salad, is it okay to do so? I mean, if you're going to be making it into smoothies like Thal suggests. Could I maybe add it to soups that I'll be blending too?

A few days ago, I came by an example sentence in my grammar textbook that translates to 'lettuce isn't just good for salads, but is actually great stir-fried.' Not sure if it's true or just for the sake of illustrating the grammar point, but I think I'll give it a try next time my lettuce is starting to get a bit too brown for salads.

That reminds me, how green is too green when it comes to potatoes? I always thought the green ones were poisonous, but I had a bag of them from my sister's allotment and while they were all from the same plants, one was significantly larger than the others. I started peeling it and it was quite green inside. The others had a feint tinge to them too, but this was much more noticeably green. I threw it away thinking it was bad, but it was a terrible waste and the guilt is still playing on my mind a little. Not sure of the variety, but the skin was reddish, and could be scrubbed off quite easily with a damp dishcloth.

- - - Updated - - -



Don't buy mixed lettuce! It's usually fairly old and tearing it up like they do makes it go off faster.

My tip would be to just make salads with one or two different kinds of lettuce. If you want to make a mixed salad, use something like rocket, endives or radicchio. Those don't go off as fast as regular lettuce and they add a lot of flavour to salads. Make up for the extra flavour with veggies. Slicing up a few veggies doesn't take long, and they usually add more flavour anyway. I like cucumbers and tomatoes (and always have a lot I have to use), but radishes and carrots last longer in the fridge.

Also, do you have any farm markets that you can get to in your area? The fresher the lettuce, the better it tastes (it actually has a lot of flavour) and the longer it lasts.

Storage also matters. Do NOT store lettuce in plastic. Store it in paper bags or slightly damp dish cloths. Hope that helps!

Okay, I'll give that a try. Actually, my mum has guinea pigs and they get fresh greens every day. Maybe I could start halving my lettuces and give half to my mum. I often do share my surplice with the pigs, but recently it's been turning too quickly to get it to her while it's still suitable for them. I place paper towels in the bottom of the salad drawer and keep them moist, but do you think I should be actually wrapping the whole thing?

I just got back form grocery shopping actually. Wish I'd seen this first!

Tylluan Penry
14 Sep 2015, 13:53
Actually lettuce isn't all that good for rabbits and guinea pigs. It gives them the runs.

As regards green potatoes, if the green is just under the skin you can peel it away, but I wouldn't advise feeding it to anyone who's pregnant just in case. Otherwise I've done it quite a few times and never had any problems. Store potatoes in the fridge. They keep a lot longer.

DanieMarie
15 Sep 2015, 00:47
That reminds me, how green is too green when it comes to potatoes? I always thought the green ones were poisonous, but I had a bag of them from my sister's allotment and while they were all from the same plants, one was significantly larger than the others. I started peeling it and it was quite green inside. The others had a feint tinge to them too, but this was much more noticeably green. I threw it away thinking it was bad, but it was a terrible waste and the guilt is still playing on my mind a little. Not sure of the variety, but the skin was reddish, and could be scrubbed off quite easily with a damp dishcloth.



Don't eat it if it's that green. A bit of green can be peeled off, but lots of green under the skin is too green.

I store potatoes in my storage cupboard out of the light.

Jembru
15 Sep 2015, 02:04
Actually lettuce isn't all that good for rabbits and guinea pigs. It gives them the runs.

According to the 'guinea-piglopedia' (the manual we got when we first got guinea pigs), iceberg lettuce isn't good for them. I never eat that horrible, tasteless stuff though (I feel like I've ranted about my hate for iceberg lettuce on PF before. I call it 'Satan's cabbage', if that rings a bell with anyone?). I mainly buy curly lettuce (especially the red one, but green will do), chard, rocket if it's not too strong, and spinach. That's what I mean when I talk about my 'salad', and they're all, according to our book, not only okay for pigs, but advisable at least a few days a week.

Sorry, I spun off topic there. I just didn't want anyone to misunderstand and think we weren't taking proper care of our lil' piggies. We're doing our best, promise! My mum in particular is very good on which things can be a sometimes treat and what can be safely fed daily.

Back on topic now. So I was probably right to throw that spud out? It's still a crying shame. Maybe I should have kept it and replanted it? That would work, right?

I've heard that both keeping potatoes in the fridge is better, and also that you shouldn't keep them in there at all. I currently keep ours at the back of a cupboard next to the freezer, although to be honest, this is not so much a preference as it is convenient, because we have a very small fridge and buy a lot of fresh stuff so it's always packed.. because our freezer is also very small... there's a bit of a vicious cycle thing going on here, can you tell? ^^

DanieMarie
15 Sep 2015, 02:19
Back on topic now. So I was probably right to throw that spud out? It's still a crying shame. Maybe I should have kept it and replanted it? That would work, right?


Yeah, that works. I do it all the time. You can even grow them in containers using this technique: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/howtogrow/fruitandvegetables/11422293/How-to-grow-potatoes-in-pots.html

But I wouldn't beat myself up about it. As much as we try to avoid waste, it's pretty much impossible to never throw anything out.

thalassa
15 Sep 2015, 03:19
You can also plant sweet potatoes. Unlike regular potatoes, (being an entirely different plant) the greens are edible.

So are carrot greens (make a great addition to salad), green onion tops, and celery leaves...all of which can be grown from the trimmings.


I'm in the process of trying to grow some date palms from date palm seeds again...my last batch (and they were a year old!!) got dumped by zee catz. You can grow avacado, lemon (and other citrus), and ginger (from the root), along with a bunch of other table scraps.

Rae'ya
15 Sep 2015, 07:17
I'm on my tablet so no multiquotes 'cos it's too hard...

Danie... I store lettuce and salad greens in plastic with no trouble. But it's those Tupperware FridgeMates with the ridged bottoms and the dual breathing holes... keeps 'em out of the condenstion and lets 'em breath. They seem happy enough and last ages. (Though I mostly buy salad greenss for the ducks, not us!)

Guinea pigs and rabbits... dark gourmet type lettuce is fine, as is rocket and raddichio. Iceberg lettuce is NOT. But I generally tell people that while it's okay, don't rely on them as greens and mix it up with carrot and celery tops, kale, spinach, mustard greens, the outer leaves of broccoli and cauli and dandelions etc. To much of any one green is not great.

Potatoes... I thought that ANY green was bad, because it's not just the green bit that's got the toxic stuff in it. Torey and I only buy potatoes when we need them (and almost never buy a bag), but I always chuck them the minute I see green.

Jembru
15 Sep 2015, 08:28
Dannie: thanks for the link. I'll definitely do this next time I find a potato that has fallen behind the rice and grown legs. You're right that I should just do as much as I can and accept that some food has to go in the bin. I had to throw out a sandwich thin this morning because it had gone moldy.

Rae'ya: I'm glad my mum's book can be trusted. It's pretty comprehensive and covers everything from basic care to common ailments. It seems to have been compiled by professional breeders rather than vets though. So it's a relief to be reassured! You've no idea how precious these lil' cavies are to my mum (actually I'm sure you have every idea having met many 'Jem's mums' yourself).

My mum has a purpose made porcelain barrel on her bench to keep potatoes in. It's like a giant cookie jar. Can you tell I have my mum on the brain at the moment?

thalassa
15 Sep 2015, 08:44
The dose makes the poison.

In the case of potatoes, they make solanine, which is a natural insectacide. The greener and deeper the green, the more solanine (solanine is coupled with cloraphyll production. Sure, you can ingest enough to make you ill, and even to kill you...but that takes a whole lotta tater.

Green potatoes are ok if only the skin is green and you peel the skin off. If the whole potatoe is green, don't eat it. If the flesh is green under the skin, you should probably bin it, but as long as you cut off all the green (and a bit beyond), you will probably be fine. One experiment (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/03/health/nutrition/03real.html?_r=0) showed something like 16 oz of the equivelent of green potato for a 100 lb person to make them ill.

Tylluan Penry
15 Sep 2015, 13:32
When I was young, this is one of the things we did with stale bread - it was lovely!
http://familystoriesphotographsandmemories.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/family-recipe-friday-nans-stale-bread.html


We also used to put broken up stale bread in a dish, pour some boiling milk on it, and maybe a bit of sugar if we were lucky. And that was lovely too.

I've never yet had a rabbit that tolerated lettuce - dandelions, yes. But wild rabbits won't touch dandelions!

DanieMarie
15 Sep 2015, 14:07
I love that recipe! I'll have to use it. I've made bread pudding before, but that looks nicer.

For anyone who uses rocket, it works cooked in some situations. So do radicchio and endives. Rocket tastes good on pizza, and although it wilts when it bakes, it holds its flavour. Radicchio and endives can be sauteed.

thalassa
15 Sep 2015, 14:11
I was sitting here going "WTF is rocket?"


Thanks to google, I know its ARUGULA!!

Jembru
15 Sep 2015, 14:22
Oh something else with a different name over there?

Yeah, I like rocket but if I can get them, I prefer to buy the living plants that keep for a few weeks or longer on your windowsill, because for some reason it can be too strong for me if I buy it bagged.

DanieMarie
16 Sep 2015, 01:11
I was sitting here going "WTF is rocket?"


Thanks to google, I know its ARUGULA!!

I had to suppress the urge to call it "ruccola," which is what it's called in German. I only ever call it that, even when I speak English.

Rae'ya
16 Sep 2015, 05:40
Oh something else with a different name over there?

Yeah, I like rocket but if I can get them, I prefer to buy the living plants that keep for a few weeks or longer on your windowsill, because for some reason it can be too strong for me if I buy it bagged.

Hehe I should post a photo of mum's rocket plants... she let them go to seed this year and they got so tall they've fallen over and are completely unrecognisable!

Which brings me back to the thing about mixed salad greens... lettuce is super easy to grow, and if you eat lots of salad you just pick off a few leaves as you need them. Provided you don't plant too many you'll have a constant supply of fresh lettuce with almost no wastage. And if you plant gourmet types, when the plants mature and get bitter, they can go to the ducks (erm, I mean guinea pigs lol).

We're staying with my parents while our house is being built and even though it's the end of winter mum's garden has harvestable lettuce, spinach, kale, raddichio, rubarb, asparagus, sage, thyme, rosemary, parsley and oregano. With four of us in the house plus two greedy ducks, having that garden is a fantadtic way to save money and reduce food wastage. I don't have to buy greens for the ducks, and we harvest what we need while the rest of the lettuce head sits in the ground keeping beautifully fresh for weeks.

Having a pet that eats greens and veg scraps as part of their healthy diet also reduces wastage... ducks, chooks, GPs and rabbits are great for that. As are worms! Worm farms can be set up in a tiny space and will use up lots of scraps and past-it veg (even the slimy ones). And compost is never waste! I think we need to consider not just reducing waste, but actually finding alternatives to chucking it in the bin.

Tylluan Penry
16 Sep 2015, 07:41
Absolutely - there are so many things we can do with all sorts of waste - even fabric and clothes. I hate throwing things out. Food especially, it goes against the grain.

I was frantically composting everything until about a year or two ago when my compost bins were taken over by bumble bees nesting in there. Nowadays I tend to leave them be as much as I can and just let the bees get on with it.

Jembru
16 Sep 2015, 11:02
I was frantically composting everything until about a year or two ago when my compost bins were taken over by bumble bees nesting in there. Nowadays I tend to leave them be as much as I can and just let the bees get on with it.

They moved into my sister's shed and now she's obsessed with them. She's learnt to identify several species (more or less, some look pretty similar), and my mum made her little bee boxes that she can use to pick them up when she finds them on the pavement and release them somewhere where they can't be stood on!

Back on topic; tonight I made my first stir-fry with the browning leaves, dried out leeks and wrinkled up ends of bell peppers I had at the bottom of the salad drawer. I bought some toasted sesame seed oil the other night, so I used a dash of that to fry in. Served it up with some couscous that I flavoured with lemon and some of the coriander I have growing on the windowsill. Yummy yummy!

kalynraye
20 Sep 2015, 10:51
Jem have you tried making pickles or jam yet? For all the cooking I can do and do do it saddens me to admit I don't seem to have a green thumb. Or at least I feel like I don't. I would love to have a small potted garden but I am also terrified I would kill it all.

Tylluan Penry
20 Sep 2015, 12:17
Limp celery - where the crunch has gone - is brilliant as a steamed vegetable.

DragonsFriend
20 Sep 2015, 19:11
Celery is always good in soups and salads. Limp or not the smell and taste adds dimensions to the meal.

Hawkfeathers
20 Sep 2015, 19:30
I chop celery and green peppers and wrap in small packages to freeze. Doing a lot of peppers now to get through the winter. The stores will still have them, but these are Farmers Market ones, much better.

Rae'ya
21 Sep 2015, 01:18
Does anyone know a reliable way to keep lemon zest without it losing it's... well it's zest?

Last night I made a Lemon Delicious with duck eggs and some lovely homegrown lemonades that were given to me by a client. I used the juice from six of them, but the zest of only two. And it felt such an enormous waste throwing the rest of the skins in the bin and wasting all that luscious zest. (But I'll tell you they are AWESOME for juicing! There was no flesh left after I juiced them and even though they are only the size of limes they gave me 2/3 cup of juice... after I wasted half of one by rolling it on the bench too hard and splitting it's guts all over the place lol).

And on that subject... egg yolks. I know you can freeze egg whites, but what about yolks that you don't use? Any grand ideas for storing or using up the 1-2 egg yolks left over when you use more whites than yolks?

Tylluan Penry
21 Sep 2015, 02:02
Can always add an extra egg to scrambled eggs :)

Jembru
21 Sep 2015, 03:18
Ask me again what I think about celery in soup, when I'm not still on the cabbage soup diet! On the bright side, I've been wasting very little fresh stuff.


Jem have you tried making pickles or jam yet? For all the cooking I can do and do do it saddens me to admit I don't seem to have a green thumb. Or at least I feel like I don't. I would love to have a small potted garden but I am also terrified I would kill it all.

Haven't had a chance. I ended up roasting the last batch, but then my dad dropped off more on Saturday morning. I know what you mean about gardening. I'm getting gradually better, but I'm pretty bad. I was watering pots of weeds for most of the summer. I also have a pot of rosemary grown in the shape of a tree. It was two plants wound together and one died over the winter. I didn't know what to do about the dead bit so I've had a half-dead plant growing in my yard all summer.

Tylluan Penry
21 Sep 2015, 04:52
Can always add an extra egg to scrambled eggs :)

thalassa
21 Sep 2015, 05:21
I'm gonna add freeze greens and put them in smoothies again.

I put my "mixed greens" in spicy smoothies all the time--add some carrots, tomato, cilantro, lemon or lime, peppers, celery, onions and/or garlic, and a quarter of an avocado (along with some chili powder and cayenne), and mmmmmmmmmmmmm....spicy veggie smoothie!

DanieMarie
21 Sep 2015, 07:04
Does anyone know a reliable way to keep lemon zest without it losing it's... well it's zest?

Last night I made a Lemon Delicious with duck eggs and some lovely homegrown lemonades that were given to me by a client. I used the juice from six of them, but the zest of only two. And it felt such an enormous waste throwing the rest of the skins in the bin and wasting all that luscious zest. (But I'll tell you they are AWESOME for juicing! There was no flesh left after I juiced them and even though they are only the size of limes they gave me 2/3 cup of juice... after I wasted half of one by rolling it on the bench too hard and splitting it's guts all over the place lol).

And on that subject... egg yolks. I know you can freeze egg whites, but what about yolks that you don't use? Any grand ideas for storing or using up the 1-2 egg yolks left over when you use more whites than yolks?

I dry it and use it in baking projects. It holds much of its flavour through the drying process.

You could also try making candied lemon peel. It's quite a nice treat.

As for yolks, I'll usually just throw them in an omelette or something like that. Unless it's Christmas, and then I make this: http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/919561197367475/Weihnachtsplaetzchen-Ausstecherle.html (sorry, but this is something I only know in German! Google translate would be helpful here, I think) You need more than 1 or 2 for that though. My family's recipe uses five egg yolks!

thalassa
21 Sep 2015, 08:20
(sorry, but this is something I only know in German! Google translate would be helpful here, I think) You need more than 1 or 2 for that though. My family's recipe uses five egg yolks!

First off...yum

Second, I think you might appreciate this: Sharkbait is trying to teach himself German. He does this by asking people if they speak German and then asking them how to say whatever word passes his fancy at the moment. Plus, he's 6 and his pronunciation is iffy in English sometimes... Anyhow, he no longer tells people "good-bye" he tells them (phonetically, because he doesn't have the pronunciation down yet) "Otter Wiener-zane".

DanieMarie
21 Sep 2015, 08:26
First off...yum

Second, I think you might appreciate this: Sharkbait is trying to teach himself German. He does this by asking people if they speak German and then asking them how to say whatever word passes his fancy at the moment. Plus, he's 6 and his pronunciation is iffy in English sometimes... Anyhow, he no longer tells people "good-bye" he tells them (phonetically, because he doesn't have the pronunciation down yet) "Otter Wiener-zane".

Haha that's adorable!

kalynraye
23 Sep 2015, 20:00
Does anyone know a reliable way to keep lemon zest without it losing it's... well it's zest?

Last night I made a Lemon Delicious with duck eggs and some lovely homegrown lemonades that were given to me by a client. I used the juice from six of them, but the zest of only two. And it felt such an enormous waste throwing the rest of the skins in the bin and wasting all that luscious zest. (But I'll tell you they are AWESOME for juicing! There was no flesh left after I juiced them and even though they are only the size of limes they gave me 2/3 cup of juice... after I wasted half of one by rolling it on the bench too hard and splitting it's guts all over the place lol).

And on that subject... egg yolks. I know you can freeze egg whites, but what about yolks that you don't use? Any grand ideas for storing or using up the 1-2 egg yolks left over when you use more whites than yolks?

Preserve the lemon zest in salt. We do a lot of preserved meyer lemons at work. The flavor is fantastic, or candy it. I know I say that a lot but i'm all for canning and preserving. As for yolks I have to think of something you can do with them. You can freeze them and yes you can even preserve them. They will dry out and look like an apricot(and it does take a long time) but grated on a cheese grater over salad is delicious. Your aren't much into dessert right? Or overly sweet stuff but you could make a lovely curd with those yolks if you've got juice of a citrus fruit.

Rae'ya
23 Sep 2015, 21:40
Preserve the lemon zest in salt. We do a lot of preserved meyer lemons at work. The flavor is fantastic, or candy it. I know I say that a lot but i'm all for canning and preserving. As for yolks I have to think of something you can do with them. You can freeze them and yes you can even preserve them. They will dry out and look like an apricot(and it does take a long time) but grated on a cheese grater over salad is delicious. Your aren't much into dessert right? Or overly sweet stuff but you could make a lovely curd with those yolks if you've got juice of a citrus fruit.

I love citrus and berry type deserts (and bitter chocolate and salted caramel), and I do make my own curd and icecream from scratch. This time I had 2 yolks left over from a desert (had a 2-yr-old-niece-helping-me mishap when beating the whites so had to redo them and therefore didn't need the yolks). I hate chucking them out, but I didn't know how to save them to use in another desert another day!

Does salt preserved lemon zest taste salty? I can preserve lemons for use in my tagine later, but the zest on it's own I wasn't sure. And I love to use lemon zest in cakes and deserts, so I wouldn't want to change the flavour much.

kalynraye
23 Sep 2015, 22:06
Yes I remember you mentioning you like the citrus desserts. Just like your preserved lemons that you use in your tagine(btw props to you for using one!!!) they will become salty. So I would agree with Dannie and candy them if you want to keep them sweet and use in your cakes and desserts. It doesn't take to long. Either leave the lemon zest in big chunks or slice it super thin. so that all you have to do is throw it right in. I picked KP's brain for other uses of the peel and he said you could make a lemon oil out of it.

DanieMarie
24 Sep 2015, 01:04
I read this today on NPR and thought I'd share: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/09/23/441460163/don-t-toss-that-sour-milk-10-tips-cut-food-waste-in-your-kitchen?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20150923

A lot of it I already knew, but I picked up a few good tips such as storing cheese in wax paper.

thalassa
24 Sep 2015, 02:41
If you like to use fresh ginger and grate it into things when you cook, freeze it. First, it actually grates better when frozen. Second, you don't waste it in the fridge or on the counter.

You can also plant it and grow your own (not after you freeze it, obviously), and freeze what you harvest...though it takes quite a bit of ginger to get enough to harvest each year.

thalassa
24 Sep 2015, 07:24
So....things to do with old bread besides bread pudding, croutons, etc...

I used to have.a.recipe for making Seligman from bread (actual bread, not flour) but I can't find it and Googlemancy is not jiving right now. But...here are some ideas (I figured since I was looking for ideas, I'd share):

http://blog.pianetadonna.it/naturalmentefelice/2014/02/10-modi-per-usare-il-pane-secco-10-ways-to-use-stale-bread.html
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/85194/semmelknoedel-bread-dumplings/
http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/warm-bread-tomato-ham
http://thequincetree65.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/leftover%20bread (http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/warm-bread-tomato-hamhttp://thequincetree65.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/leftover%20bread)

Whatever you do...don't feed it to wildlife!


Though I have to say, our home rarely has old bread...I freeze mine when I come home from the store and take the loaf out when I need it.
...dang if this isn't annoying on my kindle....

DragonsFriend
24 Sep 2015, 07:56
The Sumerians, Egyptians, Greeks and Romans made beer from bread. It lasted longer and retained most of the carbs.

DanieMarie
09 Oct 2015, 00:42
Ok, sooooooo....apples and pears.

I went fruit picking a few times over the last few weeks and got a bit carried away. I managed to gather about 10 kg of apples and maybe 5-6 kg of pears. On top of that, my food co-op collects fruit and I got an additional 4 kg of both last week and 5 kg of apples this week. There are probably more apples and pears on the way over the next couple of weeks as well. I HAVE SO MANY APPLES AND PEARS!!!

I already made a batch of applesauce and I'm thinking about making some brandied pears and freezing some of the other pears in a sugar pack. I'll take a few of the more pristine ones and put them in the cellar to store for the next couple of months. Any other ideas of what to do with both of these fruits?

iris
09 Oct 2015, 01:27
Hmmm... I love baking with apples :D I have a recipe for fairly healthy cupcakes with apple and cinamon I'll translate if you'd like?
Otherwise, apfelstrudel :p I don't know how to make it, but it looks good. I don't know about pears though :)

Rae'ya
09 Oct 2015, 01:49
Ok, sooooooo....apples and pears.

I went fruit picking a few times over the last few weeks and got a bit carried away. I managed to gather about 10 kg of apples and maybe 5-6 kg of pears. On top of that, my food co-op collects fruit and I got an additional 4 kg of both last week and 5 kg of apples this week. There are probably more apples and pears on the way over the next couple of weeks as well. I HAVE SO MANY APPLES AND PEARS!!!

I already made a batch of applesauce and I'm thinking about making some brandied pears and freezing some of the other pears in a sugar pack. I'll take a few of the more pristine ones and put them in the cellar to store for the next couple of months. Any other ideas of what to do with both of these fruits?

Both apples and pears can be canned, if you have some jars and an oven. Or stewed (similar to making applesauce only you leave the chunks bigger and use more sugar) and then frozen. Maybe stew up some apple and rhubarb and keep it to use as pie filling down the track.

Or my personal favourite... dry them! I LOVE dried apple slices, and pears are also good. I've only ever done it in a dehydrator, so I'm not sure how well they'll dry in a low oven. But I assume it can be done.

You can also use apples along with other fruits for jam... eg apple and strawberry. I've never done this, so I don't know how it affects the amount of pectin you have to add, but I'm sure there's a recipe out there somewhere.

And of course if you could get hold of a juicer you could juice them.

Munin-Hugin
09 Oct 2015, 02:06
I also saw something about pickled fruit, though I've never tried it (either the making or the eating).

thalassa
09 Oct 2015, 02:33
I also saw something about pickled fruit, though I've never tried it (either the making or the eating).

We like pickled watermelon rind. (http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/watermelon-rind-pickles-5643)




Or my personal favourite... dry them! I LOVE dried apple slices, and pears are also good. I've only ever done it in a dehydrator, so I'm not sure how well they'll dry in a low oven. But I assume it can be done.

The apples, definately...the pears, probably (http://www.thankyourbody.com/recipe-simple-dehydrated-pear-slices/)(I've not tried it).

DanieMarie
09 Oct 2015, 02:38
Hmmm... I love baking with apples :D I have a recipe for fairly healthy cupcakes with apple and cinamon I'll translate if you'd like?
Otherwise, apfelstrudel :p I don't know how to make it, but it looks good. I don't know about pears though :)

I'd love the cupcake recipe!

My boyfriend makes great apfelstrudel, so I'm sure we'll have that as well!

I may try to dry them. I only have an oven, but I'm sure I can find info on the internet. It's ok if I can't dry the pears, because I have a lot more apples than pears.

I'm not sure that jam is an option, because a) other fruits are not in season, so I have no access to things like rhubarb, strawberry, or pretty much anything other than apples and pears and b) we already have a lot of jam and we don't eat that much of it :/

Munin-Hugin
09 Oct 2015, 05:02
Drying in the oven is pretty easy. All you need to do is set it on its lowest setting and keep the door cracked open so as the moisture bakes off, it can escape. If the door doesn't stay open on its own, you Han simply put a folded up towel in one corner.

Tylluan Penry
09 Oct 2015, 05:06
I used to pickle oranges. And plums. Both were incredibly good! If you can find a recipe for either, do try them but remember to use white vinegar and not brown or pickling vinegar

Ula
09 Oct 2015, 06:27
YOU NEED WORMS!!
(http://compost.css.cornell.edu/worms/basics.html)

I started one this summer and love it. So much can go in that thing. I already need a bigger bin and it's great on plants.

B. de Corbin
09 Oct 2015, 06:57
I may try to dry them. I only have an oven, but I'm sure I can find info on the internet. It's ok if I can't dry the pears, because I have a lot more apples than pears.

If you dry the apples/pears, dip them in lemon juice so they don't turn brown.

DragonsFriend
09 Oct 2015, 07:27
My mother used to make pear honey. It was like a thick apple sauce but used as a sandwich spread. You can do the same thing with apples. It is a water bath canning technique.

magusphredde
09 Oct 2015, 16:13
Chickens ... Don't need many ... One or two will do nicely even if just for pets ...

B. de Corbin
09 Oct 2015, 16:21
Chickens ... Don't need many ... One or two will do nicely even if just for pets ...

They make swell pets...

And they drop eggs. Cats don't do that.

magusphredde
09 Oct 2015, 16:38
Roses and herbs love their poo ... And you can herd chickens ... sorta ...

DragonsFriend
10 Oct 2015, 05:21
Roses and herbs love their poo ... And you can herd chickens ... sorta ...

Well, you can at least pen chickens up and still have happy chickens. I've spent too many years as a leader in too many Pagan organizations to think about herding cats. :)

Jembru
03 Jan 2016, 11:52
Help! Got myself a big stack of dried seaweed. I asked JP to pick up some konbu along with a few other bits and pieces at the oriental supermarket. Instead he came back with what looks like a Chinese version of nori, only in thicker sheets and circular (about the size of a side plate). It's not as firmly pressed either so crumbles too easily for wrapping onigiri.

Any ideas? Besides crumbling it over rice, or just eating raw as a snack, I'm at a loss. It It's surely circular for a reason because its a wasteful shape to cut from sheets. So that makes me think it has a specific use maybe.

Also, got half a large bulb of fennel that needs to be used up. I've been adding it to roast veggies and stir fries but can't think of anything else to do with it.

Tylluan Penry
03 Jan 2016, 14:13
In Wales we eat seaweed known as lava bread. We mix it with oatmeal, make it into little cakes and fry it in bacon fat. Delicious. Search for it on Youtube - lots of suggestions there last time I looked.

Briton
03 Jan 2016, 15:57
You shouldn't use chicken muck 'raw', it should be allowed to rot and become more 'soil' like. Because their much is 'combined', it is nitrogen high and can damage soil organisms and plants.

Jembru
03 Jan 2016, 16:40
In Wales we eat seaweed known as lava bread. We mix it with oatmeal, make it into little cakes and fry it in bacon fat. Delicious. Search for it on Youtube - lots of suggestions there last time I looked.

Just had a quick look and assuming my seaweed is the same species from which nori is made, then it is of the same family as lava (they're both Porphyra sp.), so I imagine this will work! The videos I've found are using fresh lava though, so I imagine as mine is dried, it won't need to be boiled for so long.

I also won't be able to use bacon fat sadly. I'll have to experiment with various veggie options that are solid at room temperature.

I'll definitely give it a go though, so thanks for the tip!

Rae'ya
03 Jan 2016, 18:12
Just had a quick look and assuming my seaweed is the same species from which nori is made, then it is of the same family as lava (they're both Porphyra sp.), so I imagine this will work! The videos I've found are using fresh lava though, so I imagine as mine is dried, it won't need to be boiled for so long.

I also won't be able to use bacon fat sadly. I'll have to experiment with various veggie options that are solid at room temperature.

I'll definitely give it a go though, so thanks for the tip!

Have you tried rehydrating it? It might just go mushy, but it's worth a try to see if that's what you're supposed to do with it. Otherwise I bet you could do whatever you like with it... it'd be nice just crumbled into any sort of veg mix, pie filling or stirfry.

Also, and the bacon fat alternative... I doubt you'll get the same flavour from a vego option. I'd just use plain ol' butter ('cos I love to fry stuff in butter) but if that's not vego enough then maybe coconut oil? It makes things taste a bit coconutty, but not in an overpowering way. It's solid at room temps and seems to be the latest trend in alternative diet fads at the moment (paleo et al). I'm not personally convinced it's the superfood it's supposed to be, and I have no idea about the ethics or sustainability of it... but it's an option.

Jembru
03 Jan 2016, 18:39
Have you tried rehydrating it? It might just go mushy, but it's worth a try to see if that's what you're supposed to do with it. Otherwise I bet you could do whatever you like with it... it'd be nice just crumbled into any sort of veg mix, pie filling or stirfry.

Also, and the bacon fat alternative... I doubt you'll get the same flavour from a vego option. I'd just use plain ol' butter ('cos I love to fry stuff in butter) but if that's not vego enough then maybe coconut oil? It makes things taste a bit coconutty, but not in an overpowering way. It's solid at room temps and seems to be the latest trend in alternative diet fads at the moment (paleo et al). I'm not personally convinced it's the superfood it's supposed to be, and I have no idea about the ethics or sustainability of it... but it's an option.

I thought butter might at least give it a rich fatty taste. I thought about adding a dash of spice to the mix, but not sure if that would be considered sacrilege! Coconut oil is an option too I guess, but I somehow feel the butter might be closer.

I'd have to rehydrate the seaweed anyway to make the lava bread, so I was going to leave it to soak before I go to bed in the morning and see what I wake up to! Depending on how it goes, it might make a good alternative to wakame in miso soup too.

DanieMarie
04 Jan 2016, 02:13
Help! Got myself a big stack of dried seaweed. I asked JP to pick up some konbu along with a few other bits and pieces at the oriental supermarket. Instead he came back with what looks like a Chinese version of nori, only in thicker sheets and circular (about the size of a side plate). It's not as firmly pressed either so crumbles too easily for wrapping onigiri.

Any ideas? Besides crumbling it over rice, or just eating raw as a snack, I'm at a loss. It It's surely circular for a reason because its a wasteful shape to cut from sheets. So that makes me think it has a specific use maybe.

Also, got half a large bulb of fennel that needs to be used up. I've been adding it to roast veggies and stir fries but can't think of anything else to do with it.

I sometimes buy thick, dry seaweed for stir fries and soups. I soak it to rehydrate it and then add it to whatever I'm cooking. It's tasty!

Jembru
04 Jan 2016, 13:53
I sometimes buy thick, dry seaweed for stir fries and soups. I soak it to rehydrate it and then add it to whatever I'm cooking. It's tasty!

Is that not wakame though? Would the form you buy it in rattle if you shook the container? Or is it pressed into sheets and toasted?

I wrote a few days ago in the diet and spiritual practices thread (http://www.paganforum.com/showthread.php?11605-Diet-and-Spiritual-Practice&p=210576#post210576) I make it a rule to routinely eat seaweed (I'm kinda self-medicating with it but that's a different story). This is sometimes nori but I also do as you describe with wakame a lot too. That is sold as hard curly strands that are almost black in the dried state and not pressed together, and it makes kinda rubbery yet tender, flat leaves when rehydrated.

The stuff I'm talking about is the algae that grows on rocks making them slippy at the beach so has a very different texrure. It has a crunchy and crumbly texture when dry so I'd rather keep it in that form in salad (I've tasted it and it's exactly the same as nori.. I'd go so far as to say it IS nori in fact). Stir fries though... I'd have to try both ways and compare I guess.

I've soaked it and it rehydrated in seconds and was edible right away so doesn't need the hours of boiling the wild-gathered lava needs! I didn't have any oatmeal though so haven't tried the lava bread yet!

Also, the water went pink! What? Why?

DanieMarie
05 Jan 2016, 02:04
Is that not wakame though? Would the form you buy it in rattle if you shook the container? Or is it pressed into sheets and toasted?


The stuff I buy is in sheets. It comes in a soft plastic bag packed flat, like nori. It's just thicker. It may be whole pieces, though. I'm not really sure. We don't really have a lot of options here, so I just take what I can get.

Edit: I do sometimes put nori in soups and stir fries as well. I just don't rehydrate it first. It's thin enough that it absorbs the liquid as I cook the dish.

Jembru
05 Jan 2016, 05:35
The stuff I buy is in sheets. It comes in a soft plastic bag packed flat, like nori. It's just thicker. It may be whole pieces, though. I'm not really sure. We don't really have a lot of options here, so I just take what I can get.

Edit: I do sometimes put nori in soups and stir fries as well. I just don't rehydrate it first. It's thin enough that it absorbs the liquid as I cook the dish.

That sounds EXACTLY the same as the stuff I'm talking about then! I've just crumbled it into a stirfry and it's really good, but I was too nervous about adding the rehydrated stuff. I'll try it next time though for sure!

DragonsFriend
05 Jan 2016, 10:28
Would steaming the dry sheets rehydrate it? If so there wouldn't be a water mess - pink or otherwise.