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B. de Corbin
13 Nov 2015, 21:01
Tomorrow I do be buying cabbage to convert to sauerkraut. I've played with this before, but now I'm going to a larger scale production.

The difference in taste between store kraut and home kraut is beyond belief. They are like two completely different things.

If you haven't done this, try it. You will be amazed!

B. de Corbin
15 Nov 2015, 12:28
Took about an hour, but I have about 20 lbs (5 heads) in a bucket (food-grade plastic from the Walmart bakery, $1) on the ferment.

habbalah
15 Nov 2015, 12:41
Share your recipe, please? I loves me some sauerkraut.

thalassa
15 Nov 2015, 12:41
So...it may be too late to offer this advice, but I take my cabbage and salt/season (I like spicy, particularly peppergrass) it, let it sit, and then smoosh it with a rolling pin to really get those cells broken and enzymes active. Not sure what recipe you use, but when I do it that way, the only think I need is salt and whatever other seasoning I use. Sometimes I shred in apples and carrots and slice in carrots or onions or peppers (spicy peppers). Red cabbage makes pretty kraut too...


BTW: If you don't have an awesome bucket or kraut crock, you can use a ziplock bag (actually 2 of them)--you just have to make sure there is no air (air is the enemy of fermentation)

B. de Corbin
15 Nov 2015, 12:51
I used this basic recipie from Ball:

http://www.freshpreserving.com/recipes/homemade-sauerkraut

It really is nothing but salt and cabbage.

Depending on the flavor of this bath, I may try something more spiced the next time.

As I recall, the last time I played with making kraut, I was very happy with the flavor of the simple salt & cabbage variety. But variety is the spice of life, and spice is the life of variety ;)

Oh - and I'm keeping it under water with two ziplock bags filled with water - a trick I made when doing pickles.

anunitu
15 Nov 2015, 13:25
So,does this come out like Kimchi? I used to have it at a Korean Bar in Hawaii..they served it with your beer,also Soy Cakes.

http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/07/95/19/11/0007951911102_500X500.jpg

B. de Corbin
15 Nov 2015, 13:29
So,does this come out like Kimchi? I used to have it at a Korean Bar in Hawaii..they served it with your beer,also Soy Cakes.

I've never had kimchi - prolly Thalassa can answer that, but the kraut and pickles you get in the grocery store taste like cabbage or cukes soaked in vinegar. When naturally fermented, the taste is much more sublime. There's really no comparison.

I tried spending a bit more for "artisanal" kraut, but it was still cabbage in vinegar...

thalassa
15 Nov 2015, 15:14
Kimchi is made with Napa cabbage, often mixed with radishes, scallions, and radishes, seasoned with garlic, ginger, red pepper, fish sauce (and/or salted shrimp, or for the veggie/vegans you can use seaweed powder).

OH! BTW, you can use cooking oil as an airlock... :D

Rae'ya
15 Nov 2015, 19:31
The only sauerkraut I've ever 'liked' (ie tolerated) was a red cabbage kraut at German pub in Hahndorf here is SA (alas, we were there this week and they've completely changed their menu and no longer serve traditional German food!). But Torey loves sauerkraut and I've wanted to try to make some for a while now. Unfortunately, no one else in the family likes it, so mum (who is the preserving queen of the family) isn't interested in trying it out.

One day I'll work up the courage to try it. I guess the worst that could happen is that I give my husband food poisoning. :p

B. de Corbin
15 Nov 2015, 20:49
One day I'll work up the courage to try it. I guess the worst that could happen is that I give my husband food poisoning. :p

LOL - always the worry when trying "controlled decay." But the salt in the liquid and keeping everything submerged in an anaerobic environment regulates the micro ecology to keep the bad wigglies out. It's classic home low-tech food preservation technique that has stood the test of time in terms of safety.

kalynraye
15 Nov 2015, 22:09
I love kimchi!! Mind you it is not for everyone. Most people run far far away but I think its amazing. I will say no one is going to want to kiss you after you've eaten it.. unless they ate it too.

thalassa
16 Nov 2015, 02:11
The only sauerkraut I've ever 'liked' (ie tolerated) was a red cabbage kraut at German pub in Hahndorf here is SA (alas, we were there this week and they've completely changed their menu and no longer serve traditional German food!). But Torey loves sauerkraut and I've wanted to try to make some for a while now. Unfortunately, no one else in the family likes it, so mum (who is the preserving queen of the family) isn't interested in trying it out.


You might like it (them too) if they try the real deal.

I actually like to sample mine periodically, the flavor changes as the bacterial profile changes. I personally think sauerkraut is the best about 1-2 weeks in, which is before the "finish"--it's in the 2nd stage.

Here's a rough timeline:



Stage One


Leuconostoc mesenteroides initiates sauerkraut fermentation. Since Leuconostoc mesenteroides produce carbon dioxide, it effectively replaces the oxygen in the jar, making the environment anaerobic (oxygen-free). When lactic acids reach between .25 and .3%, Leuconostoc mesenteroides bacteria slow down and die off, although enzymes continue to function.


This stage lasts between one and three days, depending on temperature.


Stage Two


Lactobacillus plantarumand Lactobacillus cucumeris continue the ferment until lactic acid level of 1.5-2% is attained.
High salt and low temp inhibit these bacteria, so I hope you didn’t over-salt your cabbage – and be sure not to refrigerate yet.
This stage continues for 10-30 days, depending on temperature.


Stage Three


Lactobacillus brevis (some sources also include Lactobacillus pentoaceticus) finish off the ferment. When lactic acid reaches 2-2.5%, they reach their max growth and the ferment is over.


This final stage lasts under a week.


sauce (http://www.nourishingtreasures.com/index.php/2012/05/15/the-science-behind-sauerkraut-fermentation/)


the dates different a bit in this reference (which is very concerned with probiotic load...)--remember bacterial growth is temperature sensitive! It has good info about when it all goes bad though-- http://www.foodrenegade.com/3-biggest-fermenting-mistakes-youre-already-making/