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thalassa
04 May 2016, 04:59
What does your personal religious calendar look like (or your ideal calendar)?

Is it Wiccan (as a noun or an adjective) in nature? Something based on the local seasons? Norse, Egyptian, Celtic, Greek? What holidays do you celebrate? How, and why? Are there any holidays you would like to celebrate but don't?

faye_cat
04 May 2016, 08:23
I try to do the solstices and the equinoxes. I also do the Wiccan WoTY for now, but I'm closely examining each one as I do because my path is changing. I am starting to learn the Hellenic calendar to see if that fits me, and I do All Souls Day (former Christian Witch). I'd like to get into more of a seasonal calendar that makes sense to me.

Medusa
04 May 2016, 09:42
Birth day and Halloween are the big two important ones.

But as an atheist I'll take any holiday America tells me to take. I ain't picky.

MaskedOne
04 May 2016, 09:49
Seasons are Fall, Winter, Spring and HELL. Holidays are 10/1 (give or take) and Christmas. All the other days that people think are holidays are the days when I get stuck weathering larger than normal hordes of illiterate, ill-mannered, semi-sapients whose only purpose is to sow chaos and destruction. I think most of you call them customers.

Hawkfeathers
04 May 2016, 09:52
I celebrate the Sabbats and most of the Christian and Jewish holidays. Plus some non-religious ones like May 13th is Freedom Day, the day I left my ex. May 5th is my horse's b-day and the anniv. of the first time I set foot in this house.

anunitu
04 May 2016, 10:07
Like Duce,most any day I get presents or candy..or when I was working,the day off with pay..

DragonsFriend
04 May 2016, 14:53
Our calendar is filled with B-days, Anniversaries, some special days for us as a couple. As far as religious events go; We celebrate the six lunar events, and the nine solar events. When a solar and lunar event lands on the same day we celebrate the lunar event with the exception of a solar eclipse. The Solar eclipse is a very special day to remember the beginning of time and birth of the Goddess and God, Ki and An.
As far as holidays go... everyday is a holiday for us.

Stardust
05 May 2016, 06:18
I celebrate the solstices and equinoxes. The changing of the seasons is something I always observe and celebrate

Jembru
01 Aug 2016, 16:55
It's First Harvest again and that can mean only one thing.. I'm 34! ^^ It's also a good time to finally get round to posting in this thread.

Before I answer the thread's question I have an additional question I'd like to ask. If you do follow the usual prescribed days, do you typically celebrate on the eve, the day itself, or both? The reason I'm asking is that I saw a few folk posting 'Happy Lammas' messages yesterday. All were using the Christian name 'Lammas' so I wondered if Lammas falls on the nearest Sunday in some places? Or if it's more usual to celebrate the Sabbat on July 31st.

Mind, I often use 'Lammas' in written form just because it's easier to spell, so it's possible that's the reason the word was being used so much. The bunting above the fireplace that my mum made me, also uses 'Lammas'. She said she couldn't be bothered to cut out so many letters!

Until this past year it had been lucky if I've celebrated at all, and when I did it was just whenever I had the time or inclination regardless of the calendar date.

When I had the benefit of a coven we would try to begin our celebration in the evening of the eve (not always possible but that was the ideal scenario). If we were lucky enough to all be free the next day we would stay up past midnight, but more often than not we'd either meet again the following evening, or on the next available day. We always considered the first of the month to be the sabbat itself (yeah, even Imbolc, despite most people lining this day up with the Christian version of the holiday, 'Candlemass').

Now that I'm solitary I can be a bit more creative so I've settled on a personalised calendar. I've decided I'll still decorate my hearth the night before each sabbat, and then do any rituals I have planned on the sabbat itself. I celebrate the solar festivals/quarter days on the day they land on astrologically, and I consider the fire festivals/cross-quarter days to be November 1st (Samhain), February 2st (Imbolc), May 1st (Beltane) and August 2nd (Lughnasadh). The reason I don't celebrate Lughnasadh until 2nd, decorating my hearth on the 1st, is that my birthday is the 2nd and I like the idea of combining both celebrations! As its opposite holiday on the wheel, Imbolc therefore gets its Christian date!

Having said all of this, this year we had a little celebration in my sister's garden yesterday, but this was also for my birthday, because I'm working tonight!

DanieMarie
02 Aug 2016, 07:50
More or less based on solstices and equinoxes, and spattered with secular holidays (even stuff like Christmas doesn't feel particularly Christian where I am....there are so few Christians in Berlin).

kalynraye
02 Aug 2016, 10:13
So I follow the ADF calendar and my pantheon is celtic. Since Imbolc I have celebrated with a protogrove and can say I enjoy it thoroughly. We are starting the process of becoming a full grove.

SleepingCompass
02 Aug 2016, 15:23
Just the standard wiccan holidays; when I was starting out, most of the books I read were wiccan and it has a strong infulence on my practice, though I wouldn't classify my self as wiccan. I also try and celebrate the full moons, when I remember :)

Jembru
02 Aug 2016, 17:39
I can definitely see the benefit of taking your cues from nature and celebrating with the first snowdrop, or thorn blossom, or ripened cherry you see.

There's some wild wheat growing in one of the lanes leading up to the cemetery I do some of my witching in (by day and during opening hours... I'm not that kind of witch!). I've been planning to collect some at Lughnasadh since I first spotted it. It seemed a bit under ripe when I was gathering it, but when I got it home and put it on the fireplace, it's still really quite green. It could have used another 2 weeks or so.

We've had a lot of sun lately so I was a bit surprised. When I did a bit of googling, it seems that mid August is the usual time for wheat to ripen up here. As a land based witch, I'm starting to wonder if I shouldn't move the sabbats to match what's happening in nature locally.

Has anyone else done this? I'm torn because I like the idea of having a fixed time when we can all celebrate, and I worry that setting my own dates would make me forget to celebrate at all.

kalynraye
02 Aug 2016, 18:54
I too enjoy having a set time of when to celebrate. I know that nature has a way of keeping her own schedule but I recognize that the when I celebrate closely correlates with what is happening in nature.

thalassa
05 Aug 2016, 04:12
We've had a lot of sun lately so I was a bit surprised. When I did a bit of googling, it seems that mid August is the usual time for wheat to ripen up here. As a land based witch, I'm starting to wonder if I shouldn't move the sabbats to match what's happening in nature locally.

Has anyone else done this? I'm torn because I like the idea of having a fixed time when we can all celebrate, and I worry that setting my own dates would make me forget to celebrate at all.

I've been working on keeping the dates, but changing the symbolism.


We've started celebrating two sets of holidays--solar holidays (solstices and equinoxes) and seasonal holidays (cross-quarter days). The solar holidays correspond with the relationship between the Sun and the Earth as a life-cycle (Baby Sun King, Boy King, etc) and cross-quarter days as a reflection of the local bioregion...I'm still working this one out, since we just moved...

Jembru
05 Aug 2016, 08:14
I've been working on keeping the dates, but changing the symbolism.


We've started celebrating two sets of holidays--solar holidays (solstices and equinoxes) and seasonal holidays (cross-quarter days). The solar holidays correspond with the relationship between the Sun and the Earth as a life-cycle (Baby Sun King, Boy King, etc) and cross-quarter days as a reflection of the local bioregion...I'm still working this one out, since we just moved...

I like this idea! I've been thinking about keeping a note of the changes I observe over the course of a year, but never get round to starting. I might try to pull my finger out and look for key moments that fall near the sabbat dates. I've noticed the sycamore have already started dropping their helicopters. I'm not actually sure if this is normal or if they're early because of the hot weather we had early in the spring. A diary would help me to keep track of what's normal up here and I could maybe work some imagery into my celebrations.

volcaniclastic
05 Aug 2016, 08:33
I'm surprised I've never posted in this thread.

For a long time, I celebrated the traditional WotY. Since I have moved to the north, I only celebrate the solstices, which are big, defining points of the year for us. I have been meaning for a long time to change my calendar to celebrate what is important to me bioregionally - but I never find the time to do so. It's on my list of projects in the upcoming months to redefine what the WotY looks like for me, living in sub-arctic Canada.

I guess in a nutshell, it would be something like:

Dec 21 - Winter solstice, the shortest day of the year, and often the coldest. We have only about 2.5 hours of daylight this day.
March - April sometime: the first hint of spring, when the lakes are still frozen, but the days finally appear longer, and while it is still winter, the promise of spring to come is in the air
Nearer to the end of April: The snow melts, and the lakes finally expose open water
Mid-May sometime: The local lakes are clear, but there is still ice on the big lake for a few weeks. The ground snow is gone, and if you look closely, you might find the buds starting on the willow bushes. This is officially spring.
Beginning of June, after the last frost: Time to plant the garden.
June 21: Summer solstice, the longest day of the year. The sun DOES set on this day, but it doesn't seem like it. Anything darker than twilight is a distant memory. Lettuces and early bloomers (radishes) are ready to harvest. Everything else is week by week after this - with so much sunlight, it doesn't take long for the peas, and green beans, and raspberries.
Beginning of August: the first night that darkness reappears, where instead of twilight, we briefly get true darkness. The aurora returns to us.
End August- very early September: The final harvest. Autumn is fast approaching, and the boreal tundra turns shades of yellow and red. Root vegetables come out of the garden. Mid august, the wild cranberries are ready for picking, if you can find them.
September-October: The first snowfall. Winter is coming.
End October-early november: the lakes start freezing over. Winter is here.

anubisa
07 Aug 2016, 15:59
I celebrate the 8 sabbats, but I also celebrate some of the Catholic holidays with my family. I don't always like to do this, but I do because they are my family and I love them. I try to celebrate the different moons, but I don't always get to. That is my personal Wheel of the Year. It can change though.

monsno_leedra
08 Aug 2016, 05:55
My personal wheel would have to be based upon the seasons for where I live as well as the traditional / festive holidays observed by my family and region. As such some aspect have some similarities with the traditional Wiccanesq holiday dates while others are more aligned to more Hellene inspired dates or observances. Yet that doesn't mean they are monthly or even annual for instance the cake offering to Artemis where every 6 years not every month like many modern pagan practices make them on a full moon type thing.

Briton
08 Aug 2016, 10:50
Mine is growing, having only really started this year. Samhain, the solstices and Beltane are the big ones, but I intend to incorporate the two harvest festivals. I have dates based on the real world, so the second day of May is to be a celebration of countryside wildlife as, on that day this year, I saw an unusually high number of hares. My Beltane will be two full moons after the spring equinox and Samhain two full moons after the autumn equinox.

I will be including Christmas as a family day, which despite being from a Christian family, the Big Fella never seems to get mentioned. And they're all quite active in their respective churches so it's not like they're Christian in name only.

I couldn't give a rats ass about birthdays, but I guess milestones are important.

I am developing celebrations for my historic (Polish, Norse, Celtic, Anglo Saxon) prehistoric ancestors and the earth itself (ie nature generally including the forces).

I am learning flint knapping and will be making flint tools to bury once a year for the ancestors. I hope to pick up skill in coil pot pottery and sacrifice/offer these, too.

I am also developing a constructed language, purely for ritual use.

DragonsFriend
10 Aug 2016, 17:24
My practice has a wheel within a wheel. There are the four phases of the moon that wind their way throughout the solar celebrations. In addition are "special" activities that occur on the first light of the new moon, lunar eclipses and solar eclipses. The Lunar events tie us to the phases of life and death in our earthly bodies and the solar events are marking our passage through our spiritual lives.

volcaniclastic
13 Feb 2019, 09:46
Necro'ing this thread for the sake of conversation:

What does your personal Wheel of the Year look like? Which holidays (if any) do you celebrate, and why? Do you follow the Wiccan WotY, or some other variant? Have you created your own?

anunitu
13 Feb 2019, 09:57
df has not been on in some time i think Vol. so maybe you will get no reply.

- - - Updated - - -

did not check who started that thread,but Thal might comment back. i thought df was the one that started it sorry.

kalynraye
13 Feb 2019, 10:12
I personally follow a combination of the Celtic Wheel of the year.
Imbolc
Ostara
Beltane(I have a soft spot for Beltane even though I prefer fall because it was my first public ritual I ever attended)
Litha
Lughnasadh
Mabon
Samhain
Yule.

Some get more attention then others but I do try and recognize all of them be it lighting a candle thats color goes with the season, making a special meal with ingredients that represent this time or just getting myself outside(weather permitting) to be one with my Goddess and God.

Shahaku
13 Feb 2019, 10:13
Necro'ing this thread for the sake of conversation:

What does your personal Wheel of the Year look like? Which holidays (if any) do you celebrate, and why? Do you follow the Wiccan WotY, or some other variant? Have you created your own?

We tend to follow the Wiccan WotY simply because everyone else does. There aren't any community celebrations for any other holiday system, and when we celebrate we tend to do it as part of a community. I do feel like it serves a purpose of keeping us in tune with the cycle of nature, etc. because we take the time to really observe and feel the world around us when we come together in ritual.

kalynraye
13 Feb 2019, 10:16
We tend to follow the Wiccan WotY simply because everyone else does. There aren't any community celebrations for any other holiday system, and when we celebrate we tend to do it as part of a community. I do feel like it serves a purpose of keeping us in tune with the cycle of nature, etc. because we take the time to really observe and feel the world around us when we come together in ritual.

I would absolutely love to celebrate with a community. I don't have that here. I have always loved the open public rituals that celebrate the WoY. With a group of people celebrating and raising energy. It's a beautiful and magical thing.

volcaniclastic
13 Feb 2019, 10:24
When I lived further south, I celebrated the traditional wheel of the year, because I had proper seasons, and because I hadn't actually given it any thought to create my own. Nowadays, I only formally celebrate the solstices, which I do as a large group of friends around a bonfire. It feels a little silly to celebrate beltane as the time to plant seeds, when at beltane, my temperatures are still regularly below zero, and I'm a full month away from planting.

I'd like to write up my own WotY at some point, but I suppose I very loosely follow something like this:

- The Winter Solstice (big bonfire in the dead of night, full feast, wicker men, and as much ritual as my non pagan friends will allow)
- Imbolc (the time to make candles for the year)
- Spring Equinox
- That April/Mayish time when the ducks come back, and we tap birch trees - our true sign of spring
- the last nightfall
- Summer Solstice
- Berry harvest x1 (blueberries and other boreal berries)
- the first nighfall
- the first yellow leaf (this is often met with dismay)
- Berry harvest x2 (the cranberries, our brief autumn, often the first snowfall)
- Samhain
- freeze up

I skip out on a few of the traditional woty times, like Lughnasadh because my garden harvest doesn't even remotely line up with this. I only do big things for the solstices though. Everything else is a small candle, or a harvest meal, or marked by weeks of canning and processing. I'd like to incorporate more ritual again eventually.

Shahaku
13 Feb 2019, 10:32
I would absolutely love to celebrate with a community. I don't have that here. I have always loved the open public rituals that celebrate the WoY. With a group of people celebrating and raising energy. It's a beautiful and magical thing.

Have you looks to see if there's a Unitarian Universalist church with a CUUPS group near you? It looks like there's a CUUPs group about 2 hours away. Maybe you could reach out to them about attending a couple rituals a year? Also, Earth House has a summer festival around the summer solstice that is about 2 1/5 hours away. It's a week long event.

kalynraye
13 Feb 2019, 10:40
When I lived further south, I celebrated the traditional wheel of the year, because I had proper seasons, and because I hadn't actually given it any thought to create my own. Nowadays, I only formally celebrate the solstices, which I do as a large group of friends around a bonfire. It feels a little silly to celebrate beltane as the time to plant seeds, when at beltane, my temperatures are still regularly below zero, and I'm a full month away from planting.

I'd like to write up my own WotY at some point, but I suppose I very loosely follow something like this:

- The Winter Solstice (big bonfire in the dead of night, full feast, wicker men, and as much ritual as my non pagan friends will allow)
- Imbolc (the time to make candles for the year)
- Spring Equinox
- That April/Mayish time when the ducks come back, and we tap birch trees - our true sign of spring
- the last nightfall
- Summer Solstice
- Berry harvest x1 (blueberries and other boreal berries)
- the first nighfall
- the first yellow leaf (this is often met with dismay)
- Berry harvest x2 (the cranberries, our brief autumn, often the first snowfall)
- Samhain
- freeze up

I skip out on a few of the traditional woty times, like Lughnasadh because my garden harvest doesn't even remotely line up with this. I only do big things for the solstices though. Everything else is a small candle, or a harvest meal, or marked by weeks of canning and processing. I'd like to incorporate more ritual again eventually.

I very much like your berry harvesting festivals! When I was in Texas it was pretty hard to celebrate Yule for the simple fact that its still normally warm outside and while there is definitely darkness its not like what comes here in Wisconsin. I'd say I have grown to appreciate the seasons more being much farther north then I was.


Have you looks to see if there's a Unitarian Universalist church with a CUUPS group near you? It looks like there's a CUUPs group about 2 hours away. Maybe you could reach out to them about attending a couple rituals a year? Also, Earth House has a summer festival around the summer solstice that is about 2 1/5 hours away. It's a week long event.

There absolutely is a UU church but I don't believe they have a CUUPS group. KP and I have gone the last two years for their psychic and craft fair. I really should look more into them.

Sean R. R.
13 Feb 2019, 10:45
https://i.imgur.com/r3Ncp9G.png

Holy cow the image is HUGE

kalynraye
13 Feb 2019, 10:50
Bahahahaha Sean I dig it!

iris
13 Feb 2019, 11:59
https://i.imgur.com/r3Ncp9G.png

Holy cow the image is HUGE

Love it Sean :p move "my birthday" and "best friend's birthday" to December and you've got my wheel too xD

anunitu
13 Feb 2019, 13:51
what sign sean i am feb 19th the fish in fact are we twin signs?

Sean R. R.
13 Feb 2019, 19:58
what sign sean i am feb 19th the fish in fact are we twin signs?

8th, I'm Aquarius, the best sign ever (non debatable)

anunitu
13 Feb 2019, 20:25
yeh mine is right on the cusp between aqu and Pisces,so kinda both,kind of fits huh..two in one ever hear of two spirit people? common term for trans people

volcaniclastic
14 Feb 2019, 16:56
yeh mine is right on the cusp between aqu and Pisces,so kinda both,kind of fits huh..two in one ever hear of two spirit people? common term for trans people

Not entirely correct. Two-spirited is a term reserved for a certain sub-sect of indigenous peoples. While it can mean that somebody is trans, it can also mean a male-bodied person who performs 'feminine' tasks, such as weaving or cooking, or a female-bodied person who performs male tasks, such as hunting, or somebody who identifies as both genders (the third gender). Two-spirited is actually a lot more complicated than just meaning transgender, and there is a lot of modern misinformation about it.

The more you know :dummy:

monsno_leedra
14 Feb 2019, 17:05
Not entirely correct. Two-spirited is a term reserved for a certain sub-sect of indigenous peoples. While it can mean that somebody is trans, it can also mean a male-bodied person who performs 'feminine' tasks, such as weaving or cooking, or a female-bodied person who performs male tasks, such as hunting, or somebody who identifies as both genders (the third gender). Two-spirited is actually a lot more complicated than just meaning transgender, and there is a lot of modern misinformation about it.

The more you know :dummy:

Very much so that's also where you get the idea of the "Contrary" person that comes into play. They could be male or female but do things backwards or in reverse to the expected norms to the society. Things such as saying "Hello" when they mean "Goodbye" for instance.

anunitu
14 Feb 2019, 17:09
thanks for the info,two spirit is used a lot by trans people on there interactions with each other in discribing their self image