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thalassa
16 Oct 2010, 16:59
Post by: thalassa on December 14, 2008, 05:20:02 PM
After B. started a thread inquiring about making yogurt (http://www.paganforum.com/index.php/topic,17772.0.html), I started experimenting at this a bit…

You see, Sophie is a skinny Minnie, and she needs as much fat and calories in her diet as possible…the problem with this is that the only whole milk yogurt I have been able to find in the grocery store is the YoBaby stuff…which is NASTY (or, as Scott put it, I wouldn’t feed that to my dog, much less to my kid), and she won’t touch (and she LOVES yogurt).

The recipe I started with:


Homemade Yogurt Recipe
4 cups of fresh, organic 2% milk
1/3 cup of powdered milk
1/2 cup organic yogurt (this will be your starter)
Making yogurt begins with milk. Readers of 101 Cookbooks will not be surprised with the advice to buy organic milk that is fresh as possible. Slowly heat the milk on the stove over low-medium heat.
At this point you can choose to add powdered milk. Powdered milk creates thicker yogurt that takes less time to ferment. It's optional if you are using whole milk or two percent. Some skim and one percent milk include added milk proteins which make the product taste less watery and will behave the same way as if you added powdered milk.
For your first batch we are going to go with two-percent milk plus 1/3 cup of powdered milk. This combination of milk with the powder will produce a delicious, basic yogurt.
The most tedious thing about making yogurt is watching the milk get hot. You need it to hit 170 degrees, but not have it boil. So you want to pay attention to the pot and have a thermometer at hand. Once you've hit the target temperature, remove from heat and then wait for the milk to cool. Unless you put the pot in the refrigerator it will take some time to cool to 108-112 degrees.
If you are using existing yogurt as a starter, have it handy in a cup. When the milk is cooled to the proper temperature, mix a small amount it in with the yogurt. This will break up the yogurt and makes blending it with the rest of the milk easier. Once you add the starter, the milk can be placed in the pre-heated yogurt maker for four to eight hours. Refrigerate before serving. Makes one quart.
From http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/000176.html\


Since then, in my research of blogs, biologists and chemists webpages, recipe sites, etc, I have come to a simple conclusion…as long as you don’t kill the bacteria, everything else is open to experimentation… All these websites make it more complicated than it needs to be.

My new (and simple) method to quick (a relative term in this) yogurt making:

Take a very large pan (I use a roasting pan) with a lid, fill with a gallon of whole milk. Scald milk (this results in less whey, but is actually not necessary). Cool milk, blend some milk with a cup of started yogurt til not lumpy. Pour in pan and stir. Maintain in heated area in the bacteria’s preferred temperature range (about 100-130 degrees F). The higher the temp, the shorter the incubation time, the lower, the longer. Drain the whey. Refridgerate.

…or just buy a yogurt maker :p

(If you hate being wasteful and have issues tossing out the whey, you can make bread with it, in place of the water…it makes for a bit denser bread, but is plenty yummy. I have actually heard of people that make a drink out if it, but can’t find any recipes).

I have been splitting up the yogurt into thirds (minus a cup as a starter for the next batch)…1/3 to use in place of sour cream, 1/3 to flavor with fruit and stevia (for me) or sugar (for Sophie), and 1/3 to make into a yogurt spread (put yogurt in a cheesecloth like piece of cloth) and further drain, add herbs and such.

More resources for info:
http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser/cheese/yogurt_making/yogurt2000.htm
http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId=525
http://www.thegutsygourmet.net/yogurt.html
http://chetday.com/howtomakeyogurt.htm
http://homecooking.about.com/library/archive/blyogurtindex.htm

Since this pre-crash post, I have discovered that a far easier way to do it is to put a gallon of milk in a crockpot, add a cup of the milk to about 1/2-3/4 cup of yogurt and blend til it is no longer lumpy and dump that in the crockpot. Cover and put on warm for 3-6 hours (check periodically). For thicker yogurt, add about a cup of dry milk in the beginning (blend it separately with a smaller amount of milk before adding it to the pot to prevent lumps).

Caelia
16 Oct 2010, 21:01
Azazel and I made some decent yogurt with boiled milk, a teaspoon or so of lemon juice, and just keeping it in the fridge. Then when we made a new batch we'd just use some from the old batch with boiled milk.

thalassa
16 Oct 2010, 21:03
I thought that was how you make a buttermilk substitute?

Caelia
16 Oct 2010, 21:29
Weird. It worked fine for yogurt...

thalassa
16 Oct 2010, 21:31
Weird. It worked fine for yogurt...


lol...they all sort of taste the same anyhow...like sour milk ;D

Caelia
16 Oct 2010, 21:36
lol...they all sort of taste the same anyhow...like sour milk ;D


Hmmm, see I've never had sour milk that I know of so I can't say.

StellaMorganna
16 Oct 2010, 22:53
Powder milk? For yogurt? Never heard of this one.
I make my own yogurt for years (3 years to be precise) and have never used anything else but about half a cup yogurt and the milk I want to make yogurt.
Try to find fresh milk and boil it rather than milk from the store. When you can put your finger in the milk without burning it, pour the yogurt in it and stir. Then you need a big blanket to wrap the milk up. Wait 4-6 hours and ta - daaaaa, you got it. I usually make it in the evening and in the morning i have yogurt. I save some for the next batch.

thalassa
17 Oct 2010, 04:53
Powder milk? For yogurt?


Yup, it makes it thicker. I usually don't do it, unless I plan to make yogurt cheese, just because its less whey.

volcaniclastic
26 Oct 2010, 14:34
I thought that was how you make a buttermilk substitute?


I've always used milk and vinegar as a substitute for buttermilk...

B. de Corbin
26 Oct 2010, 17:02
Powdered meilk, eh? I'll have to try that - I make my yogurt by setting the mix (just milk with a bit of yogurt added) on top of the bun warmer on the wood stove. Making yogurt is just soooo easy, everybody ought to try it!

When I make yogurt cheese, I actually drink the whey. I don't know why, but I have a thing for sour tastes. I figure that if it was good enough for Polyphemus, it's good enough for me!

thalassa
26 Oct 2010, 17:23
Powdered meilk, eh? I'll have to try that - I make my yogurt by setting the mix (just milk with a bit of yogurt added) on top of the bun warmer on the wood stove. Making yogurt is just soooo easy, everybody ought to try it!

When I make yogurt cheese, I actually drink the whey. I don't know why, but I have a thing for sour tastes. I figure that if it was good enough for Polyphemus, it's good enough for me!


I've read you can make bread with it...and that there is some sort of gatoradey kind of drink you can make from it

BunnyMaz
02 Jan 2011, 04:58
Nothing like a simple bit of homemaking dairy products to keep me busy!

Butter is the easiest thing in the world to make. Take one carton whipping or extra thick cream, pour into a screw-top jar that is at least double the volume of the amount of cream. Screw tightly shut. Put on some energetic music and bounce about, shaking, rolling and agitating the jar. Over time the contents will whip up, stiffen, coagulate, congeal and as if by magic will suddenly become a lump of butter floating in buttermilk. This can take anything from 20min to an hour, depending on the temp of the cream, so it is a great workout! Pour through a seive or a jelly bag if you have one, reserving the buttermilk for breadmaking. Gently knead the butter in your hands or with wooden spatulas to squeeze out any leftover buttermilk, rinse under a cold tap and then (optional) add up to 1/4 tsp salt. Done.

Curd cheese is also easy, but sadly the whey leftover is no good for baking. Take a carton od the same cream, as above, or whole fat goats milk (if you can get it from the milkman do so, as supermarket cream is often pasteurised). Gently heat the cream in a pan until it is at a rolling preboil. Add vinegar (any type), one capful at a time, pausing for a moment between each capful, until the contents of the pan will suddenly separate. For a smooth, ricotta-like curd cheese, stir the cheese to break up contents. If you want something more like mozarella, do not stir. Remove immediately from the heat and strain through a jelly bag until all whey is passed through. Take curds out of the bag, add a tiny amount of salt (optional) to taste. Beaten, it goes lovely with a fruit chutney on crackers. Unbeaten, it is a perfect home made pizza topping.

thalassa
02 Jan 2011, 05:35
I've simplified making yogurt to a gallon of whole milk (just milk from the grocery store), a single serving size of plain yogurt...put it in the crockpot on warm, put the top on and check on it every couple hours.

BunnyMaz
02 Jan 2011, 05:45
Ooh, that sounds far too easy to work! I have to try it! ;D

LadyGarnetRose
17 Jul 2011, 18:59
This place, http://www.culturesforhealth.com/starter-cultures/yogurt-starter.html has cultures galore. Great store, pretty good prices, and if you keep your yogurt going, never have to buy starter again. Sort of like a sour dough or a vinegar once you get the starter cultured correctly it'll go for hundreds (really) of years.

thalassa
19 Jul 2011, 07:28
if you keep your yogurt going, never have to buy starter again.

...that, I think, is usually the problem, lol (and why in our case, its easier to go to the grocery store and get one of those single serve greek yogurts to start from when we let it go).

Hawkfeathers
19 Jul 2011, 13:25
Very interesting. I never thought about making yogurt. Can it be frozen?
Lately I've been buying Chobani brand Greek yogurt, which I like much better than other kinds. I like to take 1 part softened cream cheese, 3 parts plain Chobani, a few drops vanilla extract, stir with a spoon, add a handful of fresh berries and Voila! Breakfast or dessert. Most people would probably add sugar but I like the tartness.

thalassa
23 Jul 2014, 13:49
I made sauerkraut. Its fucking delish. OMG. So. much. better. than. a. can.

I'm eating it with tomatoes "marinated" in sweet Italian dressing.

I messed around with the recipe--put pickled garlic and peppergrass in it. Mouthgasm.

I have a hot-sweet-sour-salty batch with red cabbage going right now--it has apples, dried cranberries, and cayenne in it.

B. de Corbin
23 Jul 2014, 14:04
I made sauerkraut. Its fucking delish. OMG. So. much. better. than. a. can.

I'm eating it with tomatoes "marinated" in sweet Italian dressing.

I messed around with the recipe--put pickled garlic and peppergrass in it. Mouthgasm.

I have a hot-sweet-sour-salty batch with red cabbage going right now--it has apples, dried cranberries, and cayenne in it.

Homemade sauerkraut is De Bomb!

Have you fermented pickles too?

I add hot peppers to make them sinfully delish.

thalassa
23 Jul 2014, 14:07
Homemade sauerkraut is De Bomb!

Have you fermented pickles too?

I add hot peppers to make them sinfully delish.

I've only made fridge pickles....I've not tried fermented pickles yet.

B. de Corbin
23 Jul 2014, 14:10
I've only made fridge pickles....I've not tried fermented pickles yet.

Wait till you try it - the difference between fermented and unfermented pickles is like the difference between store and homemade 'kraut.

It's basically the same process.

thalassa
23 Jul 2014, 14:16
Wait till you try it - the difference between fermented and unfermented pickles is like the difference between store and homemade 'kraut.

It's basically the same process.

cucumber + salty water + time = pickles

Yes?

Medusa
23 Jul 2014, 14:18
Cucumbers, lemon and tajin. MMMM

B. de Corbin
23 Jul 2014, 14:22
cucumber + salty water + time = pickles

Yes?

Yup. Add garlic, dill, slim jims or jalapeños for added excitement :D

Now I want to hit the Farmer's Market & get loads of pickle cukes and cabbage...

thalassa
23 Jul 2014, 14:29
Yup. Add garlic, dill, slim jims or jalapeños for added excitement :D

Now I want to hit the Farmer's Market & get loads of pickle cukes and cabbage...

Do they have to be whole?

Like...my boss just brought me in some cucumbers, but they are HUGE...like 15 inches long. I don't have anything they will fit in, can I cut them in half? Whenever I look anything up, the pics are all are these perfect little short guys...

B. de Corbin
23 Jul 2014, 14:32
Do they have to be whole?

Like...my boss just brought me in some cucumbers, but they are HUGE...like 15 inches long. I don't have anything they will fit in, can I cut them in half? Whenever I look anything up, the pics are all are these perfect little short guys...

Yes - I always slice up bigger ones.

Heka
24 Jul 2014, 04:32
Do they have to be whole?

Like...my boss just brought me in some cucumbers, but they are HUGE...like 15 inches long. I don't have anything they will fit in, can I cut them in half? Whenever I look anything up, the pics are all are these perfect little short guys...

Yeah, we buy bread and butter pickles here, sliced up.

My friend grew monster cukes, trying to find a picture...

Rae'ya
26 Jul 2014, 01:50
Do they have to be whole?

Like...my boss just brought me in some cucumbers, but they are HUGE...like 15 inches long. I don't have anything they will fit in, can I cut them in half? Whenever I look anything up, the pics are all are these perfect little short guys...

Mum makes hers sliced when there's extra cucumbers. My stepdad is in charge of the baby cucumber pickles, which are grown and harvested especially for his pickle jars. But mum pickles any left over garden produce.

thalassa
01 Oct 2014, 02:52
How to make cider.... (http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/uga/makingapplecider_uga.pdf)

Heka
01 Oct 2014, 08:13
How to make cider.... (http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/uga/makingapplecider_uga.pdf)

I want to make mead and cider... one day...

Arella
01 Oct 2014, 11:14
Has anyone tried black garlic? I guess it's not technically fermented, although the packaging I saw at Trader Joe's had stated it was. It just looks scary to me, being all black when garlic usually looks white-ish.

Rae'ya
04 Oct 2014, 00:01
Has anyone tried black garlic? I guess it's not technically fermented, although the packaging I saw at Trader Joe's had stated it was. It just looks scary to me, being all black when garlic usually looks white-ish.

I've eaten it, but I've never tried making it. The garlic in it is very mild, and it has a sort of caramelised sweetish tinge along with a slightly odd texture. It's too subtle for cooking (but then I love my traditional garlic, so I could be biased) but I put it in salad dressings and the like and it was real nice with olive oil and vino cotto on bread.

thalassa
31 Mar 2015, 17:00
I edited the title of this thread and I going to be merging a few threads together...

But in the mean time, YOU CAN CAN BUTTER! (http://teresatronierphotography.blogspot.com/2009/11/butter-in-your-food-storage.html)