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DanieMarie
18 Oct 2010, 23:33
It's that time of year again!
I admit it, I like to be warm....I HATE being colder than 20*C and I'd prefer it to be warmer than 25. But this year I'd really like to be "greener" (and MUCH cheaper) so I have turned down my thermostat.
What are some ways you all keep warm at home...especially when you can't curl up under a blanket?
In bed I always keep a hot water bottle so I can keep toasty at night, because I especially hate being cold when I sleep. In the house I wear layers and sometimes even a scarf, but sometimes I'm still very cold. It's not -that- cold in my apartment, but I'm sensitive to it.

PharaohKatt
19 Oct 2010, 00:47
I'm pretty sensitive to the cold, too. I've found that wearing a dressing gown to bed really helps. Also, beanie + thick socks = warm.

And plenty of hot drinks! Warm you from the inside out :-)

Medusa
19 Oct 2010, 01:01
I have a small space heater with an automatic thermostat on it. I set it usually for 65 and it kicks on and off. It's really so that when I wake up, it's not to a frozen room. But normally I layer up. I have on my nightgown, flannel jammy bottoms and a sweater!

Caelia
19 Oct 2010, 01:26
I tend to have poor circulation in my feet, so keeping my feet warm is top priority. I put on sock and legwarmers (hey, I studied to become a choreographer so I can get away with wearing them). Other than that an electric blanket was the best Christmas present I've ever received.

Medusa
19 Oct 2010, 01:34
I tend to have poor circulation in my feet, so keeping my feet warm is top priority. I put on sock and legwarmers (hey, I studied to become a choreographer so I can get away with wearing them). Other than that an electric blanket was the best Christmas present I've ever received.

Oh I didn't mention that either. Being Diabetic, I tend to have bad circulation in my feet as well. So I bundle up in socks and make sure the space heater is pointed at my feet! In bad times I have also been known to rub Vick's on my feet and then putting my socks on. Warms then up right away!

DanieMarie
19 Oct 2010, 01:54
Oh I didn't mention that either. Being Diabetic, I tend to have bad circulation in my feet as well. So I bundle up in socks and make sure the space heater is pointed at my feet! In bad times I have also been known to rub Vick's on my feet and then putting my socks on. Warms then up right away!


Good tip!

Like a lot of super slim people I have bad circulation too. Despite the fidgitiness and hyperness.

yukanaoe
19 Oct 2010, 02:50
:) I wear my wedding band :)

lol sorry couldnt help it

we are in FL so its easy :)

yukanaoe
19 Oct 2010, 02:50
snuggleing with a loved one under a blanked helps to!!!!!!!!!

Dufonce
19 Oct 2010, 03:54
I ignore cold... stop thinking about how cold it is, and think warm thoughts... I imagine myself breathing in fire energy and breathing out the cold through water energy within me. =o) its how I tolerate having to walk into a freezer at work.

DanieMarie
19 Oct 2010, 03:57
snuggleing with a loved one under a blanked helps to!!!!!!!!!


I bet! I'm really looking forward to the day when I can do that :)

Being a single person though, I think the hot water bottle is the best I'm going to get right now lol.

Today, I bought: 1 pair of bootie slippers, 2 pairs of knit socks, 2 pairs of knit tights, 1 pair opaque tights and a pair of leg warmers. Cost: 45 Euro, but good value.

Dufonce
19 Oct 2010, 04:03
I also like to shove kitties under my blanket too... but thats more for entertainment... lol

AlabasterBuffalo
19 Oct 2010, 04:31
Hot tea is hands down the best warmer upper ever....well besides hot chocolate

DanieMarie
19 Oct 2010, 04:49
I also like to shove kitties under my blanket too... but thats more for entertainment... lol


LOL it IS kind of funny to watch them search for the way out.
I do often shove my feet under my cat. He's old, lazy and huge so usually he wont move I do it. Also he likes to snuggle in the winter and he's warm.

thalassa
19 Oct 2010, 04:55
I bet! I'm really looking forward to the day when I can do that :)

its only good if they stay put and don't kick... ;)




Being a single person though, I think the hot water bottle is the best I'm going to get right now lol.

Today, I bought: 1 pair of bootie slippers, 2 pairs of knit socks, 2 pairs of knit tights, 1 pair opaque tights and a pair of leg warmers. Cost: 45 Euro, but good value.


You can also make your own bed warmers from rice (http://www.make-it-do.com/make-it/make-it-do-gift-cozy-bed-warmers/). I'm make more than one, and you can pile them on at the foot of the bed--they stay warm for quite a while (the larger you make them, the longer they stay warm...but the less likely they are to fit in the microwave ;)) Also...you *could* move (or get a small) microwave to keep next to the bed---then you don't even need to get up to warm it up!

Also...get a nice fuzzy hat to go with your socks--most of your heat escapes from your head, your feet and your hands (its a surface area thing). Dress in winterizing layers (maybe not so much in bed with all those covers, but hanging out around hte house)--long underwear is your fiend (Capilene is the best synthetic (http://www.madriveroutfitters.com/c-360-patagonias-capilene-long-underwear.aspx) and (silk long underwear (http://www.wintersilks.com/) is your best natural option)...before I had children I did a lot of hiking and camping, even in the winter.

Don't forget to winterize the apartment too!

ChainLightning
19 Oct 2010, 06:26
One thing that made a difference for us, immediately, was a higher thread count sheet set. We also double up the comforter/quilt, as well as wear jammies.

Around the house, though: lights, television, stoves, computers... almost anything electric gives off some amount of heat. I've been known to strategically place things for the warmth they give off. And gone so far as to bake cookies and breads just to break a chill, in the house.

Amber
19 Oct 2010, 06:31
I'm the same way. I can not stand the cold. I have bradycardia (sp?), which is low heart rate and BP and the cold physically bothers me.

We're moving to a place where we have to pay for utilities so I will be thinking of inventive ways to stay warm as well. The only saving grace is the house is a stone house so it stays warmer in winter and cooler in summer so that should save on the bills

DanieMarie
19 Oct 2010, 06:40
Yeah my apartment is brand-new, so all the windows are good....but my heat does escape because it's a 2-floor apartment and upstairs is floor-to-ceiling windows. There's no door to upstairs either. I eventually want to make some good curtains for up there, but it's a lot of work and I also have to install a slider thing so I can slide the curtains to one side. Any suggestions?

DanieMarie
19 Oct 2010, 06:41
One thing that made a difference for us, immediately, was a higher thread count sheet set. We also double up the comforter/quilt, as well as wear jammies.

Around the house, though: lights, television, stoves, computers... almost anything electric gives off some amount of heat. I've been known to strategically place things for the warmth they give off. And gone so far as to bake cookies and breads just to break a chill, in the house.


Oooo ya when I made thanksgiving dinner it was SUPER hot in here! But electricity is also expensive too so I like to cut back on that as well.

I do like my high thread count sheets! I bought some 600-thread-count ones in Canada when I was there.

thalassa
19 Oct 2010, 06:56
Yeah my apartment is brand-new, so all the windows are good....but my heat does escape because it's a 2-floor apartment and upstairs is floor-to-ceiling windows. There's no door to upstairs either. I eventually want to make some good curtains for up there, but it's a lot of work and I also have to install a slider thing so I can slide the curtains to one side. Any suggestions?


We have a two story, and we have the problem of the downstairs being cold because there is a four foot open space underneath with no insulation. Also, our windows and doors are crappy...but thats a different fix (yay for shrink wrap!! YAY for cheap kitty litter door draft stoppers (http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art59080.asp)!!).

What we are doing this winter is shutting off the register to the living room and kitchen, and putting some heavy duty curtains between there and the kitchen (its an open floor plan, so there is no door) and between the kitchen and the stairs...in the kitchen we have a space heater. It makes sense since our upstairs gets warm and because we have all the entertainment up here--movies for the kids, etc. Also, we have draft stoppers for the interior doors, so that any room we shut off, we can be sure that its really shut off. If you have ceiling fans you can even reverse their direction to spin, it will actually push the warm air downwards to recirculate by drawing up the cool air.

volcaniclastic
19 Oct 2010, 07:04
Wow. I'm the opposite of all of you. I like to be cold. I keep my bedroom window open all year round, and very rarely use the heater (unless it gets very cold outside)

I walk around in my underwear in the mornings, and can be found in shorts until the end of October sometimes (in Canada.)

Gardenia
19 Oct 2010, 08:32
At the shelter we use to joke that getting a big dog who thinks he is a lapdog was the best way to go. ;) Or maybe a couple of smaller dogs... Or like... a dozen ferrets? :P Maybe not that one.




And gone so far as to bake cookies and breads just to break a chill, in the house.

That's why I bake and cook long meals on the stove a lot more often in the winter, keeps me nice and warm! Not just the heat from the oven, but eating all that warm food too.

thalassa
19 Oct 2010, 08:36
Wow. I'm the opposite of all of you. I like to be cold. I keep my bedroom window open all year round, and very rarely use the heater (unless it gets very cold outside)

I walk around in my underwear in the mornings, and can be found in shorts until the end of October sometimes (in Canada.)


Scott is like this too.

Maulus
19 Oct 2010, 11:59
I, too, hate the cold.. odd for someone who used to ride a bike throughout the winter and would wear a T-Shirt all year around... Now i can't abide the cold at all. To keep warm i will have 2 winter Duvets in the coldest part of the year. Heat-stealling from the Wife is also a bonus as she runs quite hot. Plus 5 cats and a dog can keep you warm in the winter too :P

M

Amelia-Mary
19 Oct 2010, 12:14
Hot Chocolate, Hot water bottle, and huge fluffy duck feather duvet :) works everytime :)

Shahaku
20 Oct 2010, 07:32
I live in a basement in Iowa and it gets cold down there, even when it's nice a toasty upstairs. We use flannel sheets, a heated mattress pad, and about three layers of those fuzzy blankets that you can buy at random places (there's a store in the mall that sells them, but only for half the year). Sometimes it gets warm enough that we're sweating by morning, but sometimes I'm still shivering. I'm definitely going to try wearing a hat of some sort. I should have thought of that last year... and having a layer of sheets under the mattress pad keeps some of the heat from seeping into the bed.

Out of bed.. I wear a blanket, kinda like a cape. But I hate the cold. I have slippers for my feet. And I usually don't take my coat and stuff off until it's absolutely necessary. I layer up on socks, like a fuzzy pair, a cotton pair, another cotton pair, another fuzzy pair... which makes my socks go really fast and is the reason my sneakers don't quite fit in the summer. I only eat warm food and I try to only drink warm drinks (hot tea, hot chocolate, coffee) and using something with a little more fat, like milk instead of water, seems to help. We had a space heater for the bathroom, cause getting out of a shower in the freezing cold basement was not fun, but I think that they got rid of it this year... Oh and we put blankets up on the outside walls covering the concrete, the windows, etc. It at least directs the heat to the floor. Sadly, it costs to much to insulate the basement so we make do with concrete walls, but the floor is carpeted.

I have a love for blankets, I think I personally have.... 4...6...7 full size blankets and at least that many throws... my fiance has another... 5.... full size blankets and I think 3 throws... so probably like between 20 and 25 blankets between the two of us... not counting the four sets of sheets and the mattress pad.... I think i have an obsession. And then his parents (who we are renting the basement from) have quite a few and his brother and his girlfriend have their own as well. Two bedroom house... partially finished basement... 6 people... 7 every other weekend... maybe it will be warmer this year. Of course that also means the door will be opening and closing more often. Ah well, any more advise for avoiding the cold would be most welcome.

thalassa
20 Oct 2010, 10:17
Sadly, it costs to much to insulate the basement so we make do with concrete walls, but the floor is carpeted.


You can build a few more layers on this by getting some area or throw rugs and going for a collage sort of effect...plus it looks cool if you pull it off correctly. Our first apartment had brand spanking new carpet and we didn't want to ruin it...but it works to add a few more layers to the floor too (that same apartment I would swear was carpeted directly onto the concrete, it was so cold and hard)

Tylluan Penry
20 Oct 2010, 12:45
Mr Penry swears by his pair of Long Johns... not sure if this is what you call them in the US - they're a type of under-trouser?

Back in January I was wretchedly cold... I even wrote about one solution to it here: http://tylluanpenry.blog.co.uk/2010/01/05/mr-penry-and-the-hat-7695443/

Shahaku
20 Oct 2010, 13:04
Our carpet is definitely directly on the concrete, it's coming up in places. And we have asbestos pipes... it bugs me to no end.

Raphaeline
20 Oct 2010, 13:30
I sleep nekkid (we're co-sleeping with the baby, so that won't last too long, unfortunately) even in the winter time; we just stack on blankets. What I did one winter was to put an electric blanket underneath me, like on top of the fitted sheet, and keep it on all night. Now I'm aware of it as a fire hazard, but it worked!

Like Chain, I bake when it gets cold, and do laundry (the dryer). A favorite is to keep a space heater in our bedroom and keep the door shut, so the rest of the house is cold but we spend our time in the smaller area that's easier to heat. When I was a kid, I would wrap a blanket around me and then sit over the heater vent and have like a warm tent.

I'm going to try the rice idea this winter! I've used ones with flax seeds for headaches and toothaches, it hadn't occurred to me we could make big ones for the bed to keep warm :)

FantasyWitch
20 Oct 2010, 13:36
SOCKS! I always wear socks when I'm cold and I feel better very quickly. Its because your head and your feet are the coldest parts of your body. Warm them up and you feel much better. X

Corvus
21 Oct 2010, 17:27
I very much dislike the cold. When sleeping I wear socks, sweatpants or those wind breaker pants, and a hoodie without the string(I swear they try to strangle you otherwise) along with a comforter, a nylon blanket and two knitted blankets. Nylon blankets are the best they keep all the heat in. My room is the attic so warmer than the rest of the house, I have a space heater also. The walls of the room are wood paneled and I have heavy curtains over the windows. I also have a furry cat who cuddles against me. My room is like perfect its always 68-70degrees.

roving_gypsy
24 Oct 2010, 21:40
We are on the west side of the puget sound in WA and we've just moved here from GA so we are still trying to get used to the cooler fall. The house we have is 3,000 square feet and we've got three kids and two dogs. At this point we are still all sleeping in seperate beds and have only had the heat (oil heat) on a few times. The house stay right around 63 degrees day and night upstairs, but the downstairs has been dropping into the low 50's. I've got my two oldest (ages 7 and 4) living down their right now, but I have a good feeling they'll be moving upstairs before the worst of the winter temps hits here. We've been using the fireplace which really helps cut the chill in the whole house and warms up the living room and den (wood stove downstairs in the den, and open fireplace with a blower upstairs). We've also got a pass to cut wood in the National forest (only fallen trees along the road) so we're keeping an eye out for any winter storms that may produce some fallen trees that we can snatch up for extra firewood for next year (this year we've spent $700 in firewood and hopefully it will last us through most of the cool months).

Besides that I've always got on a sweatshirt and socks (and I'm not a socks kinda person. lol). I don't know how my kids do it in short sleve shirts and shorts in the house when it's cold, but they say their fine (I think they're crazy). I also bake and cook long meals, drink warm stuff and have been known to pop open the oven afterwards to let the heat come into the house. I think layers are the best choice for me overall though.

Celest
25 Oct 2010, 07:07
I hate the cold too, but since I live near one of the coldest capitals in the world, I try to 'get used to it'.
Our heat and hydro is very expensive , so I try to keep the house at 20 when we're home and 17 when we're not.
We use a lot of blankets.
My daughter loves to heat up those oat/rice bags to keep her warm while she is on the puter or just watching TV.
I find that 2 pairs of socks helps quite a bit.

WaldWesen
25 Oct 2010, 07:22
Oh this is a subject near and dear to my heart!

I also have low blood pressure, and it's gotten even more so since I started running about six months ago. It tends to be in the 90-100/60 range. My perpetually cold hands and feet were explained!

Now in Germany our apartment has a hot water radiator which is a nice source of heat but kind of a "thin" heat, so I observe all the rules of socks, comfy sweaters, layers, etc. My almost-husband is also of polar bear descent and likes it cold, so the heat of our battles over the radiator key helps keep me warm, too :P Also, my German proto-husband has this belief in fresh air which I support in general, but finding the kitchen or bathroom window open in freezing weather is not amusing.)

Tea and coffee is the salvation for my hands, especially when I'm at the computer writing. My FAVORITE thing to do though is to go into the kitchen and shut the door. It's like a sauna in there when I get the oven and stove going. The windows fog up and I can bask in a humid heat for as long as dinner takes.

I also like to prop my feet up on the radiator when I'm reading. Richard is convinced this isn't healthy, but when my toes are toasty the rest follows.

DanieMarie
26 Oct 2010, 14:11
Now in Germany our apartment has a hot water radiator which is a nice source of heat but kind of a "thin" heat, so I observe all the rules of socks, comfy sweaters, layers, etc. My almost-husband is also of polar bear descent and likes it cold, so the heat of our battles over the radiator key helps keep me warm, too :P Also, my German proto-husband has this belief in fresh air which I support in general, but finding the kitchen or bathroom window open in freezing weather is not amusing.)

Tea and coffee is the salvation for my hands, especially when I'm at the computer writing. My FAVORITE thing to do though is to go into the kitchen and shut the door. It's like a sauna in there when I get the oven and stove going. The windows fog up and I can bask in a humid heat for as long as dinner takes.

I also like to prop my feet up on the radiator when I'm reading. Richard is convinced this isn't healthy, but when my toes are toasty the rest follows.


Ooo you're in Germany too?
I'm glad that I live alone, because as much as I've come to adopt the German love of "fresh air," that love stops when it's colder than 10 degrees.

I'm convinced that standing near the radiator is fine, especially with hot water heat...it's not even dry heat!

H&M has some comfy knit booties on right now for 12 Euro...I recommend them. I always wanted the down ones that you're meant to sleep in, but I always find them kind of expensive.

Amelia-Mary
26 Oct 2010, 14:18
If all else fails, we turn on the gas oven and light it and just sit in front of that XD it's very warm :P

atler
26 Oct 2010, 16:54
i love winters but yea the cold isnt always that nice so to sleep i do nothing special actually i sleep in my boxer 1 blanket same like i do the entire year through but i have the tendenncy to uhm crawlu u in a little ball when i sleep

and to come through the day i take a cold shower in the morning just like in the summer i take a hot shower just a matter of getting used so when i get outside the temprature is reasonable keeps me from shivering the entire day lol i do always wear black clothes or as dark as possible and i most of the time wear a hoodie if possible and a leather jacket
it heps for me so yea

corvus_corvidae
29 Oct 2010, 08:31
I usually just set myself on fire.

Juniper
29 Oct 2010, 09:10
Thick socks! Because I have all hardwood floor in my house...except the bedroom which has a poor excuse for a carpet. Previous owners and all... We'll think about putting in REAL carpet after we have less pets and less mess makers.

Ommmm I wear a hat indoor sometimes. Depends on how cold it gets. We've got gas powered central heat so, meh.

Also, when all that fails, I have a fireplace and a bottle of jack.

Tylluan Penry
29 Oct 2010, 10:50
Does anyone else here suffer with chilblains in winter? I do - they're the bane of my life for months on end! Grrr!

volcaniclastic
29 Oct 2010, 14:22
Does anyone else here suffer with chilblains in winter? I do - they're the bane of my life for months on end! Grrr!


What are chilblains?

Tylluan Penry
29 Oct 2010, 23:23
They're a mild form of frostbite as far as I know. The individual toes become red, and swollen, and sometimes later turn purple or black. Very common in childhood, and very common in my house. I hate them because they are so painful. Rubbing lavender oil on them helps, but doesn't cure them. When I was a child you were supposed to rub the cut side of an onion on them. Smelled terrible! (But not as bad as urine, which was another remedy - and one I thankfully never tried).

You can also get chilblains on your fingers but so far I've managed to avoid that.

But I still get them on my feet.

Maythe
30 Oct 2010, 00:45
Yup chilblains... me too. As I work outdoors my feet get very cold indeed in the winter. They're a poor circulation thing - not like frostbite which is the cells actually freezing I think! Various essential oils which aid circulation, like black pepper and eucalyptus (don't use them without checking for contraindications, and diluting!) can be rubbed into them, which helps. I tend to rub them with my oil mix before putting socks on and going to bed.

Wierdly I don't have a problem with cold at night - probably because MrK's a radiator. We have the opposite problem and sleep under a single blanket, or a sheet, for much of the year, moving up to two blankets at about this time. It has to be really, really cold for us to fish out the duvet - which is the thinnest one we could buy.

Medusa
30 Oct 2010, 01:43
They're a mild form of frostbite as far as I know. The individual toes become red, and swollen, and sometimes later turn purple or black. Very common in childhood, and very common in my house. I hate them because they are so painful. Rubbing lavender oil on them helps, but doesn't cure them. When I was a child you were supposed to rub the cut side of an onion on them. Smelled terrible! (But not as bad as urine, which was another remedy - and one I thankfully never tried).

You can also get chilblains on your fingers but so far I've managed to avoid that.

But I still get them on my feet.

Owie. No. I don't get that. But being Diabetic...I do have a very hard time with the tips of my hands and my toes getting warm. :(

WaldWesen
01 Nov 2010, 01:25
H&M has some comfy knit booties on right now for 12 Euro...I recommend them. I always wanted the down ones that you're meant to sleep in, but I always find them kind of expensive.


Ooo! Thanks for the tip! I'll have to check them out. I have two pairs of smartwool hiking socks that are my own true loves at the moment, but I don't have any nice warm "house shoes."

I agree regarding fresh air below a certain temperature. Unfortunately my husband doesn't... and the room he MOST often decides needs fresh air is the bathroom. Makes sense to a certain degree, until you get frozen to the toilet seat!

FantasyWitch
01 Nov 2010, 02:41
What I found helped to keep me warm last night was my warm bath before bed :D

Sin
01 Nov 2010, 14:00
What I found helped to keep me warm last night was my warm bath before bed :D


ooohhh noooo I do this and then cos my hairs wet and I don't own a hair dryer, my wet hair makes me super chilly :(

FantasyWitch
02 Nov 2010, 02:26
I sleep with my hair wet better than dry. Weird huh? X

Celest
02 Nov 2010, 10:58
I sleep with my hair wet better than dry. Weird huh? X


that is a little weird,
you would think that would chill you to the bones!

magusphredde
02 Nov 2010, 15:38
A warm bath with a bit of cinnamon or some capsaicin oil in the water ... Stimulates the skins blood flow ... Just be careful with capsaicin (pepper spray) ...

Dez
02 Nov 2010, 15:55
Does anyone have any advice for making windows more energy efficient? The new apartment has pretty bad seals...there's about three feet that just icy next to each window.

magusphredde
02 Nov 2010, 16:41
You could use lath strips (thin strips of wood) and tack some clear plastic tarping on the outside ... Adds another layer to the windows ... Makes a sorta air pocket adding a bit of insulating factor ... Or even go as far as add another full pane of glass either on the outside or inside ... If you do that just make sure there are a few tiny drain holes for moisture condensation to escape ... Or go the expensive route and replace with double paned low-E windows ...

Primitive Artifice
02 Nov 2010, 17:04
Honestly, I just wear heavy sweaters, extra socks, a knit hat (vs my normal fedora which I wear constantly), and stay upstairs in my little room when I'm home. I thought I read that hot drinks actually make you colder but I may be mistaken. There's not much to do in my house to keep warm. We cant afford to run the heat and this place leaks heat like nobody's business. Thus, I also tend to go out as much as possible. The heat at the toasty little coffee shop don't cost me a dime ;)
Otherwise; move. Keeping active keeps your body temperature up and will warm you up quickly. When I start to get really chilly a get up and jump around a little bit. When I'm standing you can generally tell I'm cold because I'll be swaying or moving back and forth trying to keep blood flowing and whatnot. It works rather well and burns a couple extra calories =)

DanieMarie
03 Nov 2010, 01:20
Does anyone have any advice for making windows more energy efficient? The new apartment has pretty bad seals...there's about three feet that just icy next to each window.


Since it's an apartment you can't really do much as far as installing things.

In my old place I only had single paned windows. There were two of them (an outer and an inner) but since they weren't sealed well at all it didn't matter.

You can get seal stuff at hardware stores for cheap that is like a sticker, and you can take it off when you move.

Or you can try to sew some draft stoppers.

I've also been told that you can get a removable coating for windows that helps insulate them a bit more?

Also, if you're able to put in your own curtains, put up really thick curtains. If you're strapped for cash, curtains are REALLY easy to make. You close them at night and it helps keep the heat from escaping the apartment!

thalassa
03 Nov 2010, 03:43
Does anyone have any advice for making windows more energy efficient? The new apartment has pretty bad seals...there's about three feet that just icy next to each window.


Bubble-wrap and a heavy-duty tape---you just use it like the shrink wrap stuff...

Dez
03 Nov 2010, 06:41
Thanks guys! I'll see what I can do :)

Tylluan Penry
03 Nov 2010, 13:41
Can't do much with my windows - all made of small panes set in lead. A few of them are bull's eye panes as well (the thick round blobs of glass - very old fashioned.) The wind fairly whistles through them (and occasionally sounds as though it's breaking wind.)

So yes, it's cold, but it's also very very funny! ;)

magusphredde
03 Nov 2010, 13:44
Thalassa must be a redneck ... Bubble wrap and duct tape ... I like it ... ROFL ... 8)

Sin
05 Nov 2010, 05:08
Can't do much with my windows - all made of small panes set in lead. A few of them are bull's eye panes as well (the thick round blobs of glass - very old fashioned.) The wind fairly whistles through them (and occasionally sounds as though it's breaking wind.)

So yes, it's cold, but it's also very very funny! ;)


Oooh we have this problem at my dads house.. he lives in this massive old farm house and even when it isn't windy you can hear wind whistle through the gaps from one end of the house to another =/ and because its such a big long house the wind seems to pick up momentum so at either end of the house the doors shake.
Having said that, this created an EXCELLENT environment for halloween parties ;D


right now to keep warm im litterally carrying my duvet around the flat and then when I have to leave for university its day time.. and shockingly.. the last 3 days ahve been really warm here.. well for autumn.. its just the late afternoon to morning time that hurts :P

pihlaja
05 Nov 2010, 07:42
Reading this thread makes me think there's actually some truth in the saying that Nordic people live in one of the coldest parts of the world but build and heat their houses to be the warmest ones. ;D

I think it's a bit too chilly here.. and it's almost 22 Celcius degrees (about 72 Fahrenheit) in my appartment. :D And I don't think the heaters are even on... (the temperature is set to 21 or 22, so you can't heat your appartement warmer than that)

volcaniclastic
05 Nov 2010, 08:24
Reading this thread makes me think there's actually some truth in the saying that Nordic people live in one of the coldest parts of the world but build and heat their houses to be the warmest ones. ;D

I think it's a bit too chilly here.. and it's almost 22 Celcius degrees (about 72 Fahrenheit) in my appartment. :D And I don't think the heaters are even on... (the temperature is set to 21 or 22, so you can't heat your appartement warmer than that)


This can also be said of Canadians... ;)

pihlaja
05 Nov 2010, 08:43
This can also be said of Canadians... ;)


This doesn't surprise me.. :D Maybe it's all of us living in the north.. (or in extreme south)

roving_gypsy
07 Nov 2010, 10:04
Here in the states at most hardware stores and wal mart you can buy these insulator kits for windows that is like shrink wrap. you place a double sided sticky tape on the inside frame then you put the plastic shrink wrap across the window sticking the wrap to the sticky tape, then you use a hair dryer and it shrinks the wrap to make a tight seal. There are also kits you can get for the outside of the windows too.
My parents live in an old 1800's farm house with the orignial windows. My step mom does two layers of this insulator shrink wrap stuff. One layer like described above, then a second layer putting the tape on the edge of the wall around the window and putting the plastic across the whole window space. This leaves a gap between the two layers and seems to help a bit more than just the one layer. They also have tons of blankets and quilts and in the winter they nail up quilts and blankets over the window (nails at the top so they can draw it to the side on sunny days.).

Dez
10 Nov 2010, 11:24
Great post on The Art of Manliness-- http://artofmanliness.com/2010/11/09/15-ways-to-winterize-your-home/

A fairly good synopsis would be:

--Get your furnace checked out, and change the filter regularly.

--Trim your trees, before an ice storm does it for you.

--Reverse your ceiling fans: clockwise rotation forces warm air back down. Just be sure to switch them back come spring!

--Take care of air leaks.

--Wrap your pipes.

--Have a 72 hour kit, in case of emergencies.

ChainLightning
19 Nov 2010, 16:22
Some additional, extra insulation tips that we had to do on the farm?

Hair dryer/shrink plastic crap on the inside of windows, adds an extra pocket of air for insulating against the cold. A couple years, up there, we also added another layer of clear plastic, stapled to the outside trim of the windows. Since the home didn't have storm windows to close.

Another tip that I've seen, pretty often, is instead of trucking the leaf bags down to the compost heap, line them up against the foundation of the home for some inexpensive extra insulation.

Something else, that we do, is trade out our soft, cloth rugs inside the 'heavy use' door and replace it with rubber/plastic and a boot tray, to help protect the floor against the inevitable winter slush.

There's also the last of the summer detritus, laying about the yard, that has to be stored; hoses, decorations, tools or whatever.

For a Minnesota winter? It's a start.

Dez
19 Nov 2010, 17:39
Did something for my kids a couple of nights ago, and thought I'd share, because it's working really well.

I made them cute little hotpacks, shaped like gingerbread men, last year for Christmas. They were really cute, but I didn't use stretchy enough fabric, so by this year, they were pretty much shot.

So I took a pair of L's tube socks, put about 3 cups of rice in each, mixed in a sprinkle of cinnamon, so they smelled nice when heated, and tied a knot in the top. About 30 minutes before they go to bed, I turn on the space heater in the kid's room (not safe to leave it on all night, plus expensive), and heat these guys up for about four minutes in the microwave. I put them under their covers to warm up their beds, and by the time they get it bed, the "rice guys" aren't too hot anymore.

Allie has dubbed hers "Rapunzel Sock" because of the long chunk of tub above the knot. Requests have been made for eyes and a mouth.

DanieMarie
20 Nov 2010, 02:14
That's a good idea!

I have a question for everyone though...I have troubles with grain moths and carpet beetles here, and it's a problem in pretty much all apartments in Berlin so eventually you'll get them (mine arrived this year). So I have to keep all my grains sealed. If I made something like this, how do I keep the meal worms and carpet beetles out (the adult carpet beetles aren't so gross, but I don't want to attract them because their larvae have a diet of silk and wool...don't want to ruin my nicer clothing!)
I guess if I can't find a solution I can store the bag in a ziploc when I'm not using it but I was wondering if anyone had a solution to keep them out of the bag?

Another tip (but maybe not so cheap for everyone like it is here) but I made some Gluhwein (mulled wine) last night (well, "made" is a loose term. I bought a pre-made bottle and heat it up). It's not super alcoholic because most of the booze evaporates when you heat it up, but somehow it makes you super-warm. Maybe that's why it's so popular here in winter. I was not only warm but I was burning up for hours!

Dez
20 Nov 2010, 07:42
Hmm...You could make another layer to go around the sock, so that it doesn't leave any little bits of rice flour in your bed. Something washable, made from a tighter weave then the sock. Like a pillow-case for it. Heat it up, leave it in your bed while you get ready for bed, then pop it back in a ziplock when you're ready to climb in?

Amber
20 Nov 2010, 08:12
Here in Missouri its starting to get pretty cold. I'm gonna make some of those rice things this weekend!!

Dez
20 Nov 2010, 08:20
Be sure and check the toes, if they're old socks, Amber!

I had to pull out the sewing machine, and sew another seam about a 1/2 inch above the toe, because the socks I used were rather worn.

Amber
20 Nov 2010, 08:33
Good Idea!

thalassa
20 Nov 2010, 09:40
I've been sleeping in a sleeping bag.

A 30 below rated mummy bag to be specific.

The kids on the other hand, have fleece footie sleepers and about a foot high pile of blankets.

euterpe
20 Nov 2010, 14:04
hot tea, wool socks and a duvet. :) perfect.

DanieMarie
30 Nov 2010, 14:38
After DR's advice, I made a heating neck thing out of some extra fabric and whole wheat grains (cheaper than rice here....2.5 kilo for 4 Euro!) Next to come, an eye mask, a back thing that I can strap to my back (for cramps), a bag to put in my bed at night and hand warmers for on the go!

Dez
30 Nov 2010, 16:48
Hehehe....I take it that it worked? ;)

Lunacie
30 Nov 2010, 18:31
The rice packs are awesome. Small ones that can fit in a coat pocket are good when you go outside. Or put in a sweater or hoodie pocket inside. Big ones to put in the bed, or in your lap or under your feet at the computer.

The oven is lovely when the weather gets cold, but even a crock pot cooking all day adds some heat to the kitchen. When it gets really cold and dry I try to keep a kettle of water on very low heat on the stove to add heat and moisture.

Candles, in glass chimneys or jars, also add some heat. Learned this one time when ice took down the power lines. I set out a metal tray with about a dozen candles on it and got both light and heat.

Getting up and moving around warms me up, but I have fibromyalgia and when I get cold I find it very hard to get moving.

I hate wearing hats so I wear my hoodie in the house when it's really cold. I love fuzzy socks but need something more substantial between my feet and floor since we ripped out the carpet and replaced it with vinyl flooring, so I wear slippers with thick foam soles or a pair of crocs that are big enough to wear with socks.

Dez
30 Nov 2010, 19:46
I've been wanting a pair of house-shoes, lunacie...I hadn't thought of Crocs! Those would probably help with the support issues I'm giving myself by walking around barefoot all the time, unlike regular slippers.

DanieMarie
30 Nov 2010, 23:46
Hehehe....I take it that it worked? ;)


Really well!

I did make a wheat bag wayyyy back, but hadn't done it in a while. It smells like bread when you heat it up too!

I guess I'll have to store them in a ziploc so the bugs don't get in them, but I have some of those XL ones. I'm also considering getting my apartment fumigated because the problem just isn't going away and carpet beetle larvae eat silk, wool, cashmere and cotton (aka 90% of my nicer clothes).

Lunacie
01 Dec 2010, 05:55
I know some people sneer at crocs, but they are some of the most comfortable shoes I've ever worn - because of the shape of my foot, wide and short.

Dez
01 Dec 2010, 08:04
I know some people sneer at crocs, but they are some of the most comfortable shoes I've ever worn - because of the shape of my foot, wide and short.


That describes my feet too. Definitely what I'm getting!

Celest
01 Dec 2010, 11:45
I've got no problem staying warm this afternoon...damn hot flashes!!! ::)
I've got the house temp set at 17 and I am roasting....ugg

Lunacie
01 Dec 2010, 14:38
I've got no problem staying warm this afternoon...damn hot flashes!!! ::)
I've got the house temp set at 17 and I am roasting....ugg


It was very strange when I was having hot flashes, I didn't seem to have them in the winter when they would have been more welcome.

magusphredde
30 Dec 2010, 14:23
Some additional, extra insulation tips that we had to do on the farm?

Hair dryer/shrink plastic crap on the inside of windows, adds an extra pocket of air for insulating against the cold. A couple years, up there, we also added another layer of clear plastic, stapled to the outside trim of the windows. Since the home didn't have storm windows to close.
Half the houses around here have plastic on their windows either inside or outside ... Some have both ... Shutters are used for winterizing the summer homes ...



Another tip that I've seen, pretty often, is instead of trucking the leaf bags down to the compost heap, line them up against the foundation of the home for some inexpensive extra insulation.

Also the process of composting generates heat ...

Amber
30 Dec 2010, 14:35
Hair dryer/shrink plastic crap on the inside of windows, adds an extra pocket of air for insulating against the cold. .


This! I need to get a door draft for the front door. It has the original heavy door on it but its a little drafty on the bottom. Luckly we have a stone house so its pretty insulated so we just got some of that window shrink wrap on the insides so it doesnt look ghetto yet still serves its purpose

LiadanWillows
30 Dec 2010, 16:37
I discovered this topic three months too late lol. I asked my parents what I need to do to prepare for winter, they said new filter for the heater and get it inspected. Other than that no advice... geeeez :P

magusphredde
30 Dec 2010, 18:02
This! I need to get a door draft for the front door. It has the original heavy door on it but its a little drafty on the bottom. Luckly we have a stone house so its pretty insulated so we just got some of that window shrink wrap on the insides so it doesnt look ghetto yet still serves its purpose
Sometimes you can find a sorta broom-like thing that goes along the bottom of the door Sometimes it is a rubber flap ... Sometimes you can replace,raise or modify the threshold ...
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_-SAnKTzwa8k/TL7FzVrDpxI/AAAAAAAAAJY/GFmqpwVAblc/s1600/door+sweep.jpg
http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/how-to-install-weatherstripping-onto-doors-3.jpg
http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j00zvWtLBQEVibV/Door-Sweep-DB-DS-.jpg
http://www.finehomebuilding.com/CMS/uploadedimages/Images/Homebuilding/Departments/021184bs116-05_ld.jpg
http://www.jastimber.co.uk/images/pictures/hardware/door-gear-threshers-sills/stormguard-sills-door-seals/stormguard-cdx-threshold-si.jpg





Always better with pics ... 8)

thalassa
16 Jan 2011, 18:48
DIY Insulated Curtains from old comforter (http://www.adventuresindressmaking.com/2010/11/brr-its-cold-out-insulated-window-blind.html)

magusphredde
16 Jan 2011, 20:56
DIY Insulated Curtains from old comforter (http://www.adventuresindressmaking.com/2010/11/brr-its-cold-out-insulated-window-blind.html)
Or well used sleeping bag ...

thalassa
17 Jan 2011, 06:40
Or well used sleeping bag ...


...yeah, but I'm a girl...comforters are usually cuter. ;)

magusphredde
17 Jan 2011, 09:46
http://www.pricerighthome.com/images/hello_kitty_bows_duvet.jpg
http://hellokittygifts.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/hello-kitty-pink-hotel-400x334.jpg
http://www.hotelchatter.com/files/3/hello_kitty_love_hotel_1.jpg

Amber
17 Jan 2011, 09:50
*faints*


I LOVE Hello Kitty...but even I wouldn't go that far LMAO

TaiganPagan
17 Jan 2011, 11:43
One of the best stuff to help conserve heat into homes is given by Nature itself: Snow!!!!!
It's highly heat reflective (very hard to increase or decrease of 1 degree)... so let it pile up a bit on the roof (couple of inches), and also block your cellar windows with it.

magusphredde
17 Jan 2011, 18:54
Also plugging up the vents around your foundation helps keep cold drafts from cooling your floors and robbing heat if you have central air by cooling the ducts ...

lorraine02
14 Oct 2012, 23:56
air condition is necessary ,
and atmosphere is also important , such as colour, furniture.

Lord of the weeds
01 Dec 2012, 18:20
When it gets cold I cram some more logs in the woodstove

Jembru
01 Dec 2012, 20:06
Oh, it's the time of year to read over this again.. I am quite disturbed by how much it costs to heat our place. We live in a very small two bedroom flat. The master bedroom is large however, so it has 3 radiators. We only use one in there.. the one in the alcove where we set up our futon. We have a radiator in the hall, which seems pointless using, and one in the space between the kitchen and bathroom which we also never use. However, it is starting to cost us almost £15 in gas per week to head the FOUR radiators we use and the thermostat was struggling to get above 16 degrees today. I'm starting to wonder if I should be using all the radiators and just have them on low in the areas we don't use. But this will be, what £80 a month? To heat a tiny downstairs flat? It is so annoying... We use a timer so the heating isn't on all day.. just two hours in the morning and 4 hours in the evening, except weekends, when JP is up and about through the day. It blows my mind that it can be costing us this much.

Caelia
02 Dec 2012, 07:13
Are the windows insulated, Jembru? You can do that with a clear plastic sheet. I believe they even sell them for windows, otherwise folks use trash bags.

AL!CE
02 Dec 2012, 07:18
Footie Pjs.
Snugrug (blanket with sleeves).
Fingerless gloves for whilst using the computer.
Microwabable teddybear (also great for cramps).

Jembru
02 Dec 2012, 15:09
My windows are double glazed, but it's a very old building, so built before being thought to insulate outside walls. There is a common problem in these kinds of old buildings, where they can tend to get very damp around the outside walls. I heard it is because of double glazing and central heating. Our place isn't too bad, but when we blast the heating, I start to notice it. When Magpie sits on the windowsill, her little paws sometimes get wet!

volcaniclastic
02 Dec 2012, 17:20
Fur.

I'm probably going to get unhappy folks about this, but most of my warmest clothing is either wool, fur, or down-filled. Animals were meant to be used!

Jembru
02 Dec 2012, 17:48
Fur.

I'm probably going to get unhappy folks about this, but most of my warmest clothing is either wool, fur, or down-filled. Animals were meant to be used!

Not sure I agree with 'meant to be used', but I can't argue against them being bloody good at keeping warm! Mine just won't stay still long enough to warm my toes..

nbdy
03 Dec 2012, 07:14
At the shelter we use to joke that getting a big dog who thinks he is a lapdog was the best way to go. ;) Or maybe a couple of smaller dogs... Or like... a dozen ferrets? :P Maybe not that one.

That's why I bake and cook long meals on the stove a lot more often in the winter, keeps me nice and warm! Not just the heat from the oven, but eating all that warm food too.

Absolutely! Summer is for grilling outside to keep the house cool, but winter is for baking in the oven to keep the house warm. Tonight -- meatloaf.

Almost_lost
03 Dec 2012, 11:37
Im in the process of making a couple of draught excluders for our front door, back door and my bedroom. Because we live in a terraced house, its sooooo draughty!

DanieMarie
03 Dec 2012, 13:58
Oh, it's the time of year to read over this again.. I am quite disturbed by how much it costs to heat our place. We live in a very small two bedroom flat. The master bedroom is large however, so it has 3 radiators. We only use one in there.. the one in the alcove where we set up our futon. We have a radiator in the hall, which seems pointless using, and one in the space between the kitchen and bathroom which we also never use. However, it is starting to cost us almost £15 in gas per week to head the FOUR radiators we use and the thermostat was struggling to get above 16 degrees today. I'm starting to wonder if I should be using all the radiators and just have them on low in the areas we don't use. But this will be, what £80 a month? To heat a tiny downstairs flat? It is so annoying... We use a timer so the heating isn't on all day.. just two hours in the morning and 4 hours in the evening, except weekends, when JP is up and about through the day. It blows my mind that it can be costing us this much.

Yeah heating is expensive on this side of the atlantic. Blame all the people crammed onto this continent and your island! I pay less, but i have a newer flat, and also I am cold a lot. I hate cold, but I wear a lot of layers and hug a hot water bottle when I can.
Also, do you have gas-heated water? If so, you can save a TON of money by washing your hands with cold water (I swear it's fine...everyone does it in Germany...soap cleans), washing your face with cold water, and only rinsing stuff with cold water (save the warm/hot water for thorough washing).

- - - Updated - - -


My windows are double glazed, but it's a very old building, so built before being thought to insulate outside walls. There is a common problem in these kinds of old buildings, where they can tend to get very damp around the outside walls. I heard it is because of double glazing and central heating. Our place isn't too bad, but when we blast the heating, I start to notice it. When Magpie sits on the windowsill, her little paws sometimes get wet!

This is also common in Berlin....to avoid water damage, you have to open your windows for a bit every morning and every night for a few minutes. I warped my floors last year! They went back though when the dampness went away. Berlin is extremely humid, so we always have to do it, even when it's -20 outside (actually, especially when it's -20 outside).

- - - Updated - - -


Fur.

I'm probably going to get unhappy folks about this, but most of my warmest clothing is either wool, fur, or down-filled. Animals were meant to be used!

It's true. If you don't want to contribute to the industry, there are LOADS of vintage coats and accessories that are floating around. I actually think it's more ethical to wear these than to just throw them out or let them rot in an attic. I get evil looks when I wear my fur, but it's all recycled (mostly vintage stuff I fixed up or repurposed somehow).

Jembru
04 Dec 2012, 14:47
Yeah heating is expensive on this side of the atlantic. Blame all the people crammed onto this continent and your island! I pay less, but i have a newer flat, and also I am cold a lot. I hate cold, but I wear a lot of layers and hug a hot water bottle when I can.
Also, do you have gas-heated water? If so, you can save a TON of money by washing your hands with cold water (I swear it's fine...everyone does it in Germany...soap cleans), washing your face with cold water, and only rinsing stuff with cold water (save the warm/hot water for thorough washing).

- - - Updated - - -



This is also common in Berlin....to avoid water damage, you have to open your windows for a bit every morning and every night for a few minutes. I warped my floors last year! They went back though when the dampness went away. Berlin is extremely humid, so we always have to do it, even when it's -20 outside (actually, especially when it's -20 outside).


Yes, our water is gas heated. I did suggest to JP a while ago that we start using cold water to wash our hands. In fact, I could go further and use a cream cleanser instead of tap water to remove my make-up and wash my face. We're just a bit worried about how cold the water is from the tap. being in Berlin, you probably know yourself how cold the water pipes get in Winter. I guess we could keep the sink filled so the water is room temperature. A little less hygienic, but maybe we could also get into the habit of using antibacterial hand gel. Great tip. Thanks!

Erm.. I know I SHOULD open the windows. Our bathroom window is almost always on the night lock, and in the livingroom, our window is actually a glass door, into the yard, so it is often open while Magpie plays outside. I don't think the bedroom windows have been opened even once since we moved in. I have blinds and black out curtains with me sleeping during the daytime, and these are basically always closed. When it's cold already, I just can't bring myself to open the windows.. :s

Hawkfeathers
04 Dec 2012, 14:58
Some really small things can be quite helpful - like those foam things you put in your electrical outlets (they look like the faceplate, and go in right behind it. Put these in every outlet you have that is on an outside wall. You'd be surprised the drafts that come in. Also that cheap rubber stripping you affix to your doors to seal any gaps is good stuff.
If you have a dishwasher, in the winter always open it as soon as it's done to let that rush of warm air and humidity out. Same thing with clothes dryer & stove. Cooking in a slow-cooker (crockpot) releases a tiny stream of steam out the little hole in the top, good for both heat & moisture.

Jembru
04 Dec 2012, 15:06
Some really small things can be quite helpful - like those foam things you put in your electrical outlets (they look like the faceplate, and go in right behind it. Put these in every outlet you have that is on an outside wall. You'd be surprised the drafts that come in. Also that cheap rubber stripping you affix to your doors to seal any gaps is good stuff.
If you have a dishwasher, in the winter always open it as soon as it's done to let that rush of warm air and humidity out. Same thing with clothes dryer & stove. Cooking in a slow-cooker (crockpot) releases a tiny stream of steam out the little hole in the top, good for both heat & moisture.

The thing about the electrics has reminded me.. our flat has large bay windows and on the floor in the alcove of the windows, there are two small metal grills. There must be cold air coming in through them, but I don't know if I can safely cover them over with a rug or something, or if they have to be there. If it is to stop the area getting damp, my kitten's paws say it isn't working, but then it could be the thick curtains that cause the condensation to collect on the windowsill..

DanieMarie
05 Dec 2012, 07:33
Yes, our water is gas heated. I did suggest to JP a while ago that we start using cold water to wash our hands. In fact, I could go further and use a cream cleanser instead of tap water to remove my make-up and wash my face. We're just a bit worried about how cold the water is from the tap. being in Berlin, you probably know yourself how cold the water pipes get in Winter. I guess we could keep the sink filled so the water is room temperature. A little less hygienic, but maybe we could also get into the habit of using antibacterial hand gel. Great tip. Thanks!

Erm.. I know I SHOULD open the windows. Our bathroom window is almost always on the night lock, and in the livingroom, our window is actually a glass door, into the yard, so it is often open while Magpie plays outside. I don't think the bedroom windows have been opened even once since we moved in. I have blinds and black out curtains with me sleeping during the daytime, and these are basically always closed. When it's cold already, I just can't bring myself to open the windows.. :s

Yeah I know what you mean...if I hadn't warped the floors, there's no way I'd be trying it.

Anyway, give the water thing a try. It can feel icy at first, but you do get used to it. I can't give you an exact savings yet (and I only started doing it in the fall, so next year will be even cheaper!), but I looked at my water meter in the bathroom and it's barely moved since I've started doing it, so I think it will make a huge difference. I also use cold water to rinse out the sink and rinse (not wash) dishes.

Another thing I do to save hot water is when I have a shower (I have baths sometimes...not the best but it's my luxury thing), I plug the drain so I can see how much water has been used, and I shut off the water when I shampoo and condition my hair.

- - - Updated - - -

Ooo I see that I didn't post this last year....

Another thing I do is that I turn the heat off (or down, if it's really cold and I think the pipes might freeze otherwise) at night, and I sleep with hot water bottles under the covers.

Tylluan Penry
05 Dec 2012, 07:42
We try to always keep the windows open during the day time in winter as long as it isn't raining outside. Our problem is condensation because the walls of the house are almost three feet thick in places. So we also use a dehumidifier. I even have rechargeable dehumidifier eggs in the food cupboards. Dehumidifiers aren't expensive to run, and a dry house feels much warmer than a damp one.

But here's a very cheap preventative for chilblains... use embrocation on hands, feet etc the moment they start to feel cold. It restores the circulation in minutes. The old fashioned Snow-Fire is good, and so is Balmosa.

Jembru
05 Dec 2012, 12:32
We try to always keep the windows open during the day time in winter as long as it isn't raining outside. Our problem is condensation because the walls of the house are almost three feet thick in places. So we also use a dehumidifier. I even have rechargeable dehumidifier eggs in the food cupboards. Dehumidifiers aren't expensive to run, and a dry house feels much warmer than a damp one.

But here's a very cheap preventative for chilblains... use embrocation on hands, feet etc the moment they start to feel cold. It restores the circulation in minutes. The old fashioned Snow-Fire is good, and so is Balmosa.

I was going to get some of those disposable damp boxes. They are like plastic containers with silacone salts in to take some of the moisture out of the air. I never thought, but it could be the damp that makes me feel so cold even when it is meant to be 21 degrees.

That's the problem about living on this island (and much of Europe). Our buildings are just so old. It's all very nice having so much history, but do we HAVE to live in it?

XIII
05 Dec 2012, 12:49
Tips for keeping warm? Well here's a great one.
Live in the South of the U.S.

It's 73 degrees outside right now. :D

Tylluan Penry
05 Dec 2012, 15:29
I was going to get some of those disposable damp boxes. They are like plastic containers with silacone salts in to take some of the moisture out of the air. I never thought, but it could be the damp that makes me feel so cold even when it is meant to be 21 degrees.

That's the problem about living on this island (and much of Europe). Our buildings are just so old. It's all very nice having so much history, but do we HAVE to live in it?

The egg type dehumidifiers are great for cupboards and really small spaces... also they're economical because you just recharge them for a few minutes in the microwave. Damp can make you feel very cold indeed. Plus in my food cupboards it ruins my bread flour!

Maria de Luna
05 Dec 2012, 15:44
The egg type dehumidifiers are great for cupboards and really small spaces... also they're economical because you just recharge them for a few minutes in the microwave. Damp can make you feel very cold indeed. Plus in my food cupboards it ruins my bread flour!I have exactly the opposite problem, I have a dry place, and it dries out my sinuses, and I bleed when I sneeze... The people in the lower apartment keep it so hot we have to keep the window open to let the cool in...

Jembru
05 Dec 2012, 16:17
The egg type dehumidifiers are great for cupboards and really small spaces... also they're economical because you just recharge them for a few minutes in the microwave. Damp can make you feel very cold indeed. Plus in my food cupboards it ruins my bread flour!

I'll see if I can get my hands on some then. The Internet will probably be my best bet I guess!

Tylluan Penry
05 Dec 2012, 23:51
I'll see if I can get my hands on some then. The Internet will probably be my best bet I guess! Amazon do a pack of two for about £7 - cheaper than disposables in the long run. (Mind you that depends on the level of dampness.)

- - - Updated - - -


I have exactly the opposite problem, I have a dry place, and it dries out my sinuses, and I bleed when I sneeze... The people in the lower apartment keep it so hot we have to keep the window open to let the cool in...

Gosh.... hadn't thought of that, but you mean.... the people in the lower apartment can afford HEATING??? Wow ;)

thalassa
06 Dec 2012, 03:31
Gosh.... hadn't thought of that, but you mean.... the people in the lower apartment can afford HEATING??? Wow ;)

A lot of our apartments here have free heat...Americans are pretty spoiled in the area of climate control!

Tylluan Penry
06 Dec 2012, 03:44
A lot of our apartments here have free heat...Americans are pretty spoiled in the area of climate control!

Aaagh! Here heat is virtually unaffordable for many people. Every winter I get chilblains (a form of frostbite really) despite thick socks, leather shoes etc. I type wearing fingerless gloves, a hat and sometimes five layers of clothing!

Jembru
06 Dec 2012, 03:57
Aaagh! Here heat is virtually unaffordable for many people. Every winter I get chilblains (a form of frostbite really) despite thick socks, leather shoes etc. I type wearing fingerless gloves, a hat and sometimes five layers of clothing!

Tell me about it. I fear for the unemployed. The cost of energy has always been high here, but it has increased so much that it must be near impossible for some people to afford heat AND food. I know my mum can't afford it on the benefits she gets, but she's lucky, she has family to help her out. I can't stand to think of people out there in the same situation as my mum who have no one at all. Where do they go for help? I have promised myself that if.. no, lets say when, my mum finally finds work, I'm going to start making a regular donation to the local food bank. The poverty here is getting scary.. children sleeping in their coats because it is too cold, going to school without any food.. I need to stop watching BBC1 in the early hours...

Tylluan Penry
06 Dec 2012, 04:21
Tell me about it. I fear for the unemployed. The cost of energy has always been high here, but it has increased so much that it must be near impossible for some people to afford heat AND food. I know my mum can't afford it on the benefits she gets, but she's lucky, she has family to help her out. I can't stand to think of people out there in the same situation as my mum who have no one at all. Where do they go for help? I have promised myself that if.. no, lets say when, my mum finally finds work, I'm going to start making a regular donation to the local food bank. The poverty here is getting scary.. children sleeping in their coats because it is too cold, going to school without any food.. I need to stop watching BBC1 in the early hours...

The problem is that here we have a 'ruling elite' made up of millionaires. They have no knowledge of, nor any interest in, the hardship of others.

And the reason I put quotes around 'ruling elite' is because I don't think we have a clue who is really ruling the country. The present shower don't appear to have a brain cell between them.... ;)

B. de Corbin
06 Dec 2012, 04:42
A lot of our apartments here have free heat...Americans are pretty spoiled in the area of climate control!

:( Speak for yourself. I live in the Great White North, and pay about $3000 a year for heat. When I can afford it.

And that's with supplemental heating from a wood stove.





On the up side, cooling is free.

DanieMarie
06 Dec 2012, 06:36
A lot of places in Canada also have free heat. I never had it...I had electric heat and an electric hot water heater, but electricity in BC is dirt cheap...I think I paid $30 a month for all my electricity, heat, and hot water, as opposed to about 130 Euros here for all that combined.

B. de Corbin
06 Dec 2012, 06:42
A lot of places in Canada also have free heat. I never had it...I had electric heat and an electric hot water heater, but electricity in BC is dirt cheap...I think I paid $30 a month for all my electricity, heat, and hot water, as opposed to about 130 Euros here for all that combined.

I pay between $150 and $200 per month for electricity (we have nothing that isn't standard in most homes) - we get our power from a hydroelectric dam, which appears to be a rather expensive way of doing it... although it is a renewable natural resource... which I guess I get to pay for...

I do get water for free, though. One of the advantages of living with your own well in soggy Michigan.

DanieMarie
06 Dec 2012, 07:31
I pay between $150 and $200 per month for electricity (we have nothing that isn't standard in most homes) - we get our power from a hydroelectric dam, which appears to be a rather expensive way of doing it... although it is a renewable natural resource... which I guess I get to pay for...

I do get water for free, though. One of the advantages of living with your own well in soggy Michigan.

I'm pretty sure that 100% of the power in BC is hydroelectric. But it's well-established and there are a lot of dams supporting not too many people. It's a crown corporation though, meaning that it's owned by the province, so I think high profits aren't so important for them.

B. de Corbin
06 Dec 2012, 07:34
I'm pretty sure that 100% of the power in BC is hydroelectric. But it's well-established and there are a lot of dams supporting not too many people. It's a crown corporation though, meaning that it's owned by the province, so I think high profits aren't so important for them.

Technically, we have a co-op. I'm not entirely sure if this affects the cost or not - it seems it should make it cheaper...

thalassa
06 Dec 2012, 10:54
:( Speak for yourself. I live in the Great White North, and pay about $3000 a year for heat. When I can afford it.

And that's with supplemental heating from a wood stove.





On the up side, cooling is free.

Yup, the Great White North is a 'whole 'nother kettle o'fish, in terms of heating. But here where our average winter temperature in january is between 49 and 34, a lot of places can afford it as a way to attract renters--particularly in older buildings where gas heat was the standard and they are trying to compete with newer apartments where its not. Air conditioning on the other hand...well, when it gets up to 110 or so, electric gets expensive. I pay for my heat and my winter electric bill for a 2 bedroom apartment is about $100, but in the summer time it can get over $200.

Tylluan Penry
06 Dec 2012, 13:08
Out of interest, what sort of temperatures do you expect to maintain inside the home?

Here we've had it down to about 41 - 43 Fahrenheit which is damned cold. ;)

Jembru
06 Dec 2012, 14:06
I don't know how to do the old fahrenheit system, but in metric, our place drops to 12 degrees celsius if we don't have the heating on and until I realised I have to use the radiator in the hall to stop us losing heat, we couldn't get it over 15 degrees. Now it's getting up to 19, but I still need to wear thick socks and layers at 19 degrees. I'm most comfortable at around 21, 22. JP has a crazy high metabolism so his body produces excess heat anyway. He feels perfectly warm at 15 degrees!

thalassa
06 Dec 2012, 14:35
Out of interest, what sort of temperatures do you expect to maintain inside the home?

Here we've had it down to about 41 - 43 Fahrenheit which is damned cold. ;)

Yeah, no! That is too cold for me...

We keep our apartment at 68 in the winter and 74 in the summer.

Medusa
06 Dec 2012, 14:45
I'm upstairs on the North side of the house. It's great in summer when the temps are cooler on this side. But during the winter (mind you I'm in Southern California and I won't freeze to death) it's like a fridge. I add extra bedding, socks and flannel bottoms. And I have a small space heater. I also have rubbed Vicks Vapor rub on my feet and legs. Because I'm Diabetic I already have less circulation so I get extra cold on my toes.

Tylluan Penry
06 Dec 2012, 15:02
I don't know how to do the old fahrenheit system, but in metric, our place drops to 12 degrees celsius if we don't have the heating on and until I realised I have to use the radiator in the hall to stop us losing heat, we couldn't get it over 15 degrees. Now it's getting up to 19, but I still need to wear thick socks and layers at 19 degrees. I'm most comfortable at around 21, 22. JP has a crazy high metabolism so his body produces excess heat anyway. He feels perfectly warm at 15 degrees!

41 - 43 Fahrenheit is just 5 - 6 celsius. Indoors. Anyone visits me, they need their coat. And gloves. And a hat.

Alternatively they can just cwtch up to the St Bernard....

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I'm upstairs on the North side of the house. It's great in summer when the temps are cooler on this side. But during the winter (mind you I'm in Southern California and I won't freeze to death) it's like a fridge. I add extra bedding, socks and flannel bottoms. And I have a small space heater. I also have rubbed Vicks Vapor rub on my feet and legs. Because I'm Diabetic I already have less circulation so I get extra cold on my toes.

Try something like an embrocation (for pulled muscles) instead of Vick... it works really well. At the moment though my toes are just turning purple. By about April they will start coming back to life again....

DanieMarie
07 Dec 2012, 00:52
Out of interest, what sort of temperatures do you expect to maintain inside the home?

Here we've had it down to about 41 - 43 Fahrenheit which is damned cold. ;)

I'm not sure how warm it is in my home, but I think it's around 18 Celsius or so. I'm most comfortable when it's over 25, so I'm pretty much only happy with the temperature between June and early September. It would cost me hundreds of Euros a month to heat my home that much. If I didn't have the heating on at all, I don't know that it could drop too much more than that...I live at the top floor of a condo building, and while my upstairs room is floor to ceiling windows (ie lets out heat in the winter and makes it like a greenhouse in the summer), I still get all the heat rising in the building, and since it's a new building the insulation and windows are pretty good.

Jembru
07 Dec 2012, 01:11
This thread has definitely given me some perspective. I see what a massive range of heating costs we face and don't feel quite so bad that it costs us more than £10 a week to heat our flat. Seems a good average. We are currently putting £30 on the electric each month, and £50 on gas. I suspect we'll end up spending more on the gas and might owe the electric (I pay by payment card), when the invoice comes. Still, I don't feel such a victim now. I feel within the normal range.

It's not nearly so bad as when Michelle lived here. My gods she was wasteful. Our duel fuel bill was always around £200 a month over the winter. Crazy!!

DanieMarie
07 Dec 2012, 01:56
Eeek that is bad! That's worse than the first year I lived here, where I didn't know how much it would cost to heat a large place and had a 600 Euro adjustment bill at the end of the year.

Maria de Luna
07 Dec 2012, 02:45
I live in a tiny apartment, and this thread makes me feel like I am cheating... We spend about $95 for about 3 months in the summer on electric with our little window airconditioner, and we let it run all of the time... in the winter we don't heat the place, we open windows...

Tylluan Penry
08 Dec 2012, 13:00
I'm not sure how warm it is in my home, but I think it's around 18 Celsius or so. I'm most comfortable when it's over 25, so I'm pretty much only happy with the temperature between June and early September.

Oh, temperatures I can only dream about. I mentioned it dropped to 41-43 fahrenheit which is about 5 Celsius - so you get the idea.
Not unusual for me to wear a hat and gloves indoors!

DanieMarie
11 Dec 2012, 12:49
My neighbours are home, so it's warmer now without needing so much heat!

ShadowOfTheMoon
12 Dec 2012, 04:26
Drink tea :)

Really cold over here atm. Lots of snow too. Brrr!

DanieMarie
12 Dec 2012, 05:02
It's supposed to rain on the weekend...booooo! It'll be warmer, but rain and slush always feels colder than cold and snow.

Tylluan Penry
12 Dec 2012, 07:11
It's so cold here today that I can no longer function. I think I should signal the Mothership to come and get me.....

Lord of the weeds
13 Dec 2012, 09:35
We pay about $275 a month for electric year round. The bill is averaged for 12 months. When it gets cold I use the woodstove, but we have an inground pool that the pumps run all summer so that keeps the bill high.

Maria de Luna
13 Dec 2012, 09:42
It's so cold here today that I can no longer function. I think I should signal the Mothership to come and get me.....
I wanna send you better gloves!... thats terrible that it is too cold to function in your own home!

Jembru
13 Dec 2012, 10:36
We had £15 on our heating on Sunday, it is now Thursday and already ran out. We only have the heating on for 6 hours a day and this is a tiny 2 bedroom flat. I can totally see why someone like Tylluan, living in a house, would struggle to afford heating costs. We've been told we're due another fuel hike in the new year and its really not long since the last time our bills went up. The fuel companies say its to meet the rising cost of producing energy, but yet their annual profits are still going up. Not slightly reduced, or remaining the same, as you'd expect if production costs were rising, but actually increasing. They are a massive part of the increased poverty and steep reduction in quality of life in this country. Our flat is currently at 13 degrees. Daybreak said this morning, that more and more people now have to choose between eating or heating, as food prices have also shot up (how can farms and factories cover overheads when the fuel needed to produce the food is so expensive?). These companies are evil. Pure evil. They must know what they are doing to people. The government has threatened to start legislating against the pricing of fuel, so they're taking the piss while they still can.

Tylluan Penry
13 Dec 2012, 11:38
I cannot imagine what the temperature is here today.... but it's very cold. We manage the heating on for about two hours a day, sometimes a little more, but I do use an electric blanket on a low setting at night. We use very old (victorian) quilts which are incredibly warm too! The fault - as Jembru says - is largely due to the unmitigated greed of the energy companies. Prices only go up - rarely down, even when costs reduce. And that really makes me want to spit!

Jembru
13 Dec 2012, 12:25
I know it is trivial, but are you using a hot water bottle? We are currently sitting with the duvett over us and I made a hot water bottle. I am really rather cosy now and the thermometer says it is 16 degrees in here, which is usually uncomfortably cold. I'm sure you already do this, but couldn't help suggesting it as it really helps me so much!

Almost_lost
13 Dec 2012, 12:57
I need to buy a hot water bottle! At the moment its about -2 here, if my housemates didnt have a baby i would suggest turning the heating off and just wrapping up with hot water bottles etc because the energy bills are so expensive! It's one reason im in the process of making a draught excluder for the front and back doors, so we can maybe turn the heating down or off a little while.

Jembru
13 Dec 2012, 14:11
Oh another thing. I always wear a hat indoors during the winter. Mind you, in my teen years, I always wore a hat or a bandanna indoors or out, no matter what time of year it was. I have some cool hats, some of which I never, or rarely wear outdoors. House hats, I guess!!

volcaniclastic
13 Dec 2012, 14:33
You know, I've never (no matter where I lived) had issues with heating/how much it costs.

Why's it so bad in the UK? Do you lot all have those little coin-operated heaters I've seen in some older buildings? Or floor radiators, or what?

We have central heating, and yeah, it can cost $200 a month sometimes in the winter, but...I dunno, it's seen as normal, or 'the price you pay' or something.

Jembru
13 Dec 2012, 14:50
You know, I've never (no matter where I lived) had issues with heating/how much it costs.

Why's it so bad in the UK? Do you lot all have those little coin-operated heaters I've seen in some older buildings? Or floor radiators, or what?

We have central heating, and yeah, it can cost $200 a month sometimes in the winter, but...I dunno, it's seen as normal, or 'the price you pay' or something.

The cost of living is just generally very high here. Prices go up but wages don't. The UK has always been an expensive place to live, but right now it is ridiculous. I read somewhere recently (or was it on the news?), how much on average it costs to run a car, as a percentage of income, in the UK compared to other nations and we are seriously being ripped off here. We are ripped on everything. I am so lucky not to have to commute to work. I feel terrible at the prices people pay. I know a girl on minimum wage down south. She works in a pound shop at just 29 hours a week (she can't find any other work, but at least gets to do overtime now and then). These hours are over 5 days though, so even though she doesn't get full time hours, she still needs to commute to work every single day which instantly removes over £100 a week from her already low wage. I can't even begin to imagine how anyone is meant to live on so little money. Needless to say, she lives with her mother.. who she does not get on with.

The fuel companies are being investigated though. Something about price fixing. If they are found out to have been committing fraud that has led to such steep rises in cost, we could see some form of compensatory action. Who knows though. These are wealthy and powerful organizations, but then so are the banks and look what has happened to British banking.

Tylluan Penry
13 Dec 2012, 15:05
I do wear a hat indoors! Yay! And fingerless gloves..... but I have to admit I have a horror of hot water bottles since I was badly scalded by one when I was a child (and still have the scars!) I tend to stick with wool whenever possible, and wrap up warm, but at the temperatures this week, I don't think anything is touching it!

Oh - and I drink lots of hot tea!

Jembru
13 Dec 2012, 21:53
Shale gas!! That's why North Americans pay so much less for energy. Was just on TV because there's a big debate at the moment about fracking being allowed in the UK. They asked, 'would it reduce our gas bills?' Then said, 'it has in the US, but they have nearly 30 times as mich shale gas as we have.' (I rewinded the news to give an accurate quote, how's that for dedication?).

DanieMarie
14 Dec 2012, 06:21
The fuel companies say its to meet the rising cost of producing energy, but yet their annual profits are still going up. Not slightly reduced, or remaining the same, as you'd expect if production costs were rising, but actually increasing. They are a massive part of the increased poverty and steep reduction in quality of life in this country.

Same here, and electric as well. For electricity, the government told electric companies that they had to start participating in funding green energy by giving them a surcharge, but of course instead of taking that out of their massive profits, that surcharge was passed on to us.

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You know, I've never (no matter where I lived) had issues with heating/how much it costs.

Why's it so bad in the UK? Do you lot all have those little coin-operated heaters I've seen in some older buildings? Or floor radiators, or what?

We have central heating, and yeah, it can cost $200 a month sometimes in the winter, but...I dunno, it's seen as normal, or 'the price you pay' or something.

You've mostly lived in BC though, right? $200 is a lot less to the average BC resident than 125 pounds is to the average British resident, because incomes are higher on average. Also, the cost of energy is so much lower in BC. So, so much lower. I always lived on the coast, which I admit has blissfully low heating costs (mind you, so should the UK as the climate is similar), but even a mild winter here in Berlin (which could also be similar) where I rarely use heat will carry higher costs than if I used the heat daily back home. AND I think heat/gas is a bit cheaper in Germany than the UK. Wages have also stagnated in Germany. I think this is true for the whole country, but as most of the country is fairly high-income, it's not really such a big deal. In Berlin though, it's a HUGE deal. It's traditionally a very cheap city, but rents are rising fast, and the rising costs of stuff like food and energy are felt really strongly. People earn lower wages here than the rest of the country and wages aren't going up, even though costs are starting to resemble other German cities.

I think in general, Europe is facing a lot of intense political corruption, and it's not really being dealt with because of the financial crisis. Even over here where things are better financially, they still use it to justify everything, like "we're doing everything right because we're not in a recession". Unfortunately low labour costs have been cited as one of the things that shelters Germany, so there's little incentive to introduce something like a minimum wage (which would be massively helpful to the high number of people living in Berlin making 4 Euros per hour). The UK isn't so much in a recession anymore as it is stagnant, but "recession" is still used to justify really crappy pay, major cuts, and rising costs.

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Shale gas!! That's why North Americans pay so much less for energy. Was just on TV because there's a big debate at the moment about fracking being allowed in the UK. They asked, 'would it reduce our gas bills?' Then said, 'it has in the US, but they have nearly 30 times as mich shale gas as we have.' (I rewinded the news to give an accurate quote, how's that for dedication?).

Yep, and looking at this map, it also explains why Alberta is so rich (they also have all the oil):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:EIA_World_Shale_Gas_Map.png

Back in the day, I also had electric heat, which people went off of back home as they got sold natural gas provided by private companies, but is actually rather green as electricity comes from renewable sources in the province, and is dirt cheap, as it's provided by a provincial crown corporation.

Maria de Luna
14 Dec 2012, 06:27
Shale gas!! That's why North Americans pay so much less for energy. Was just on TV because there's a big debate at the moment about fracking being allowed in the UK. They asked, 'would it reduce our gas bills?' Then said, 'it has in the US, but they have nearly 30 times as mich shale gas as we have.' (I rewinded the news to give an accurate quote, how's that for dedication?).
There are debates about the accuracy of this over here right now... Apparently fracking is not entirely safe, or even remotely good for the environment, but they want to frack wildlife preserves... I am not sure what the point of a wild life preserve that doesn't preserve wildlife. There are arguments as to whether it is as efficient as it could be and whether it really is saving money... which is an agument for a different day...

Hawkfeathers
14 Dec 2012, 06:34
I keep records of my electric & natural gas bills, and in New Jersey they were higher. Both homes heat with nat. gas, and have (electric) central a/c, gas stove. I've been here in MO over 3 years now and my annual average for gas is $632.25, and for electric $707.86 (that includes central air. The last 3 years I lived in NJ, the annual gas avg. was $732.37 and electric $980.43.
Electric in particular was much higher in NJ - and my water heater and clothes dryer there were both gas - here both are electric.
Procurement is different here - the county buys electricity for the rural areas, and the city buys for within city limits. But it all boils down to profits and who makes the best deal.

Jembru
18 Dec 2012, 01:09
I know it's not really keeping warm, but saving on your energy bill that we've started to drift towards, but I think they go hand in hand. If you're using alternative methods of keeping warm, you will save money and if you find ways to cut back on your energy bill, you'll feel more confident to turn up the heating when it gets colder. So I think this post is on topic.

We have decided to ban me from having baths all the time. I'm allowed a bath no more than once a week and have to shower the rest of the time. JP prefers to shower, but I almost always take a bath to get clean and I know this is wasteful of hot water. We have also turned the hot water right down so that the shower is at the right temperature without having to turn on the cold water too. That should save a bit of money. It's too cold for a bath though, so on bath night, I'll have to turn the hot water back up. It also means we're washing our dishes in cooler water, but most washing up liquid is antibacterial so I don't think the water needs to be scalding anyway. Hopefully this will save a few pennies at least.

It's been slightly warmer this week actually, so we've been able to keep the heating off most of the time. We do need to wrap up because it's 16 degrees in here, but 16 is nothing compared to the temperatures of last week, so we're saving money while we have the option.

I probably mentioned this all ready, but in addition to my dressing gown, I also wear lovely fleecy pajamas that I got cheap from Primark. Primark's adult night clothes are a bit too big for me, which means I can wear them over clothes or other PJs. This is soo snuggly and I definitely recommend it. I've got two pairs and I have thick fluffy socks and two pairs of slippers in matching colours. I like to be stylish AND cosy! ^^

DanieMarie
18 Dec 2012, 01:27
I know it's not really keeping warm, but saving on your energy bill that we've started to drift towards, but I think they go hand in hand. If you're using alternative methods of keeping warm, you will save money and if you find ways to cut back on your energy bill, you'll feel more confident to turn up the heating when it gets colder. So I think this post is on topic.

We have decided to ban me from having baths all the time. I'm allowed a bath no more than once a week and have to shower the rest of the time. JP prefers to shower, but I almost always take a bath to get clean and I know this is wasteful of hot water. We have also turned the hot water right down so that the shower is at the right temperature without having to turn on the cold water too. That should save a bit of money. It's too cold for a bath though, so on bath night, I'll have to turn the hot water back up. It also means we're washing our dishes in cooler water, but most washing up liquid is antibacterial so I don't think the water needs to be scalding anyway. Hopefully this will save a few pennies at least.

It's been slightly warmer this week actually, so we've been able to keep the heating off most of the time. We do need to wrap up because it's 16 degrees in here, but 16 is nothing compared to the temperatures of last week, so we're saving money while we have the option.

I probably mentioned this all ready, but in addition to my dressing gown, I also wear lovely fleecy pajamas that I got cheap from Primark. Primark's adult night clothes are a bit too big for me, which means I can wear them over clothes or other PJs. This is soo snuggly and I definitely recommend it. I've got two pairs and I have thick fluffy socks and two pairs of slippers in matching colours. I like to be stylish AND cosy! ^^


Yeah saving on energy does lead to finding alternative ways of keeping warm! Or perhaps keeping warm in other ways has the added benefit of saving money. For me it's the former haha.

I also limit myself to one bath a week...two if there's something special or I'm sick (I swear it helps clear my sinuses!) I also plug the shower drain when I shower...just a tip! it helps you see how much water you use. I turn off the shower when I'm shampooing my hair and shaving my legs. Otherwise I can use as much water as when I have a bath!

Jembru
18 Dec 2012, 01:51
Yeah saving on energy does lead to finding alternative ways of keeping warm! Or perhaps keeping warm in other ways has the added benefit of saving money. For me it's the former haha.

I also limit myself to one bath a week...two if there's something special or I'm sick (I swear it helps clear my sinuses!) I also plug the shower drain when I shower...just a tip! it helps you see how much water you use. I turn off the shower when I'm shampooing my hair and shaving my legs. Otherwise I can use as much water as when I have a bath!

That's a very good tip! I try to be in and out as fast as I can, but I admit I keep the shower running while I shampoo my hair!

Tylluan Penry
18 Dec 2012, 05:48
Just had a letter from the gas and electricity provider. They are putting their prices up.

B. de Corbin
18 Dec 2012, 06:30
Just had a letter from the gas and electricity provider. They are putting their prices up.

That sucks. My heat has actually gone down this year - substantially.

Tylluan Penry
18 Dec 2012, 07:00
That sucks. My heat has actually gone down this year - substantially.

Thanks.... in a way I understand we're in a catch-22 situation here. If the price goes up, we use less to save money. Then the firm's profits go down so they put the price up some more! :(

volcaniclastic
18 Dec 2012, 07:02
I have an agreement with my landlords, where we pay a solid $200 a month for utilities/heating. In the summer, he makes money. In the winter, we save money. And it balances itself out for the rest of the year.

DanieMarie
18 Dec 2012, 08:06
Thanks.... in a way I understand we're in a catch-22 situation here. If the price goes up, we use less to save money. Then the firm's profits go down so they put the price up some more! :(

I think this is an essential problem with privatized electric and heat services. They need to make profits. If they're a government corp, profits aren't really the #1 concern.

Jembru
18 Dec 2012, 08:25
Just had a letter from the gas and electricity provider. They are putting their prices up.

We got ours last week. All companies are doing it because they're scared by government promises to ensure all households are put on the cheapest tariff by fuel companies, because so many homes were paying more than they needed to due to confusing tariffs. I wish the government had just banned companies from increasing prices. If they find they were price fixing, as it appears they were, goodness knows what will happen to prices.

Jembru
26 Feb 2013, 08:10
Just popping by to see how everyone has been coping with the cold lately? I know I've mentioned it before, but honestly, the futon in the living room idea is saving us a small fortune. It used to be a 'treat night' thing. When we were both off work, we'd bring the futon through and laze around eating junk food and drinking beer. We had noticed that we needed to keep turning the heating down, or even off, when we did this, and we turned the radiators off in the front bedroom too.

I was off work all last week and it has been a particularly cold week with a few splatterings of snow. However, we were in the futon in the livingroom all week, and spent less than half of what we were spending on our gas. As I write this, it is 12 degrees in here and I am wearing my fleecy primark PJ's and have a hot water bottle on my lap. I'm perfectly warm and the heating is switched fully off.

We're getting a bed soon, so eventually hope to let go of this tatty old thing, but we have agreed that when we replace the sofa, we will get a sofa bed. We'll be keeping the futon until then of course. I'll be really sad to see it go. But I've outgrown it really. I got it at a time when I slept in a room just under 5 meters squared. My room here when it was Michelle's flat, was similarly small. Having a bed that folded up so I had room to do yoga, or a cosy sofa lounge on, was a good idea. Now we have lots of space, well, comparatively, so it's bye bye student lifestyle...

Anyway, it's great. If you can get a sofa bed, or move your mattress into your livingroom, even just when it drops below 0, I recommend it. It's roughing it a bit, but saves money. Maybe even enough to buy a bed! :p

Azvanna
14 Apr 2013, 01:38
It's just heading into cooler weather here in sub-tropical Queensland, Australia. I remember reading an article that proposed wearing socks to bed and nothing else helps maintain body temperature. Well, I gave it a go and it worked really well. If I sleep this way, I don't make a mess of the bed throwing blankets on and off all night and I sleep through the 3-4am temperature drop. I think you could do this in summer or mild winter nights. Not sure how you'd be in very cold places, though. ;)

Amelia-Mary
14 Apr 2013, 11:08
Sounds odd, but don't take really hot showers, you'll cool down faster when you get out, just a couple of degrees about room temperature (if you're fancy and have the choice, I have to jut guess). Also a hot water bottle when you go to bed, if you get too hot, you can just shove it to the bottom of the bed to keep your feet warm.

Jembru
18 Apr 2013, 21:42
Ah, I couldn't be without my hot water bottle! We've really managed to keep our costs down this year. Haha take that energy companies 凸(^o^)

Bjorn
18 Apr 2013, 21:58
I have learned to climb into bed with a very large, hairy man that closely resembles a bear in order to keep warm.

Jembru
18 Apr 2013, 22:01
I have learned to climb into bed with a very large, hairy man that closely resembles a bear in order to keep warm.

I would, but I think JP would complain.. well, unless it's Simon from Yogcast.. I think he has a little man crush..

Gleb
03 Aug 2013, 12:36
Try to concentrate on the heat your body makes, and stay focused on this heat. :)

Dragua Kalė
21 Aug 2013, 15:48
Oh let's see. I found a handy dandy thing this last year. They're hot packs from Sam's Club. I can't remember the name of them but they have a little metal disc that you pop and they heat up. They're not just good for keeping warm, but also good for using as a heating pad. To get them back to "normal" you boil them and then you can use THAT warmth to keep warm. They have foot and hand shaped ones too. They have a lifetime guarantee too.

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That does nothing for poor circulation.


Try to concentrate on the heat your body makes, and stay focused on this heat. :)

rocky
22 Aug 2013, 02:23
Blanket will be the best of all i guess it makes you warm and keeps warm till you are under it.

Melanija
12 Sep 2013, 18:02
I learned a body heating trick many years ago. I tried it and found actually worked. It was taught to me by a martial Qi Gong teacher. It is as simple as holding your thumb with the other hand, you can hold either thumb but the left seemed to be a common preference.

Lilium of the Valley
15 Oct 2013, 07:04
"warm" thoughts :cool: hehe

Jembru
17 Oct 2013, 10:13
Blanket will be the best of all i guess it makes you warm and keeps warm till you are under it.

This all the way!! And a hot water bottle!

So, gas prices are set to go up, yet again, by around 6%. As if we aren't all being squeezed enough as it is! Last year, JP and I moved the futon into the living room and we camped out there together with all the radiators turned off other than the one in the toilet and the one in the living room, which we only put on for 2 hours max per day. Often, we would simply get too warm and have to switch the radiator off!

I'm done with sleeping on the floor. It was good when I was flat sharing and only had a small living space. I liked folding up my bed and tidying it away, or using it as a seat through the day. We actually have space now though, so I want a bed. I was going to get one soon, and then get a new sofa in the new year, but I have decided to get a sofa bed now, so we can camp in the living room like last year, and wait until the new year to get a bed. I've seen a really nice sofa bed at half the price I expected to have to pay. We needed it anyway and it will save us money over the colder months, so I've just about made up my mind.

oldhippie
12 Jan 2014, 21:18
I have learned to climb into bed with a very large, hairy man that closely resembles a bear in order to keep warm.
yes bears are good! :D

DON
04 Feb 2014, 11:17
Here's a good article on cutting 87% of your electric heating bill:
richsoil dot com slash electric-heat dot jsp

kalynraye
02 Jan 2015, 23:26
Luckily for me I am my own radiator. I can sweat myself out with no problem. That being said my husband likes to keep the house around 64 degrees when he sleeps. I am also completely ok with this as I said because I can sweat us both out otherwise. There is a throw blanket on each couch and I have fleece p.j.'s that I live in. I also have two dogs who feel the need to be right on top of me constantly so that helps with staying warm as well.

Bjorn
05 Jan 2015, 06:37
I'm going to stay warm by never leaving my bed.

Seriously. Today it's a Herculean task.

anunitu
08 Jan 2015, 08:05
Here in NJ it is COLD!!,it was down to ZERO last night,thats F,not C...Wind chill was -20 over night..

Hawkfeathers
08 Jan 2015, 08:59
^^^ Same here in MO. I'd love to find somewhere I can live that's always between 50-80 with low humidity. Perhaps I'll someday reincarnate onto that planet.

SleepingCompass
08 Jan 2015, 09:06
^^^ Same here in MO. I'd love to find somewhere I can live that's always between 50-80 with low humidity. Perhaps I'll someday reincarnate onto that planet.

Sounds like a nice planet....

thalassa
08 Jan 2015, 09:25
I'm cold. My office is cold. Its cold outside. Its cold inside. I'm wearing long underwear, my normal clothes, a fleece sweatshirt, fingerless gloves, a hat, a shawl, a quilt, and my unauthorized heater is running. And I'm still cold.

Medusa
08 Jan 2015, 09:33
It gets to like 48 at night. It's cold. It's cold now. I have a sore throat over the damn cold. I covered my throat and mouth with a scarf.

habbalah
08 Jan 2015, 14:01
I have learned to climb into bed with a very large, hairy man that closely resembles a bear in order to keep warm.

I wish I hard a large hairy man to keep me warm! In the meantime, I'm making due with extra blankets and the kittens, if they deign to sleep on me.

anunitu
08 Jan 2015, 14:06
The term "3 dog night" is about being cold,you need three dogs with you to keep warm..

Bjorn
08 Jan 2015, 14:29
I wish I hard a large hairy man to keep me warm! In the meantime, I'm making due with extra blankets and the kittens, if they deign to sleep on me.

Oh man, that post was from a while ago. There is no hairy bear to keep me warm but my pops got me a killer warm blanket from NM so I'm pretty toasty so long as I stay in bed. Forever.

oldhippie
08 Jan 2015, 15:03
Oh man, that post was from a while ago. There is no hairy bear to keep me warm but my pops got me a killer warm blanket from NM so I'm pretty toasty so long as I stay in bed. Forever.


I wish I had a large hairy bear to snuggle with

SleepingCompass
09 Jan 2015, 10:06
The term "3 dog night" is about being cold,you need three dogs with you to keep warm..

I'm one dog short... maybe that's why I'm still so cold!