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Medusa
04 Nov 2010, 19:59
I couldn't figure out a section to put this. Anywho...
Anyone have any experience with the Nuvaring and any side effects?
Thanks.

Eh I figure post your questions here. Just try to use words like vajajay or cookie. :P

Amber
05 Nov 2010, 05:58
I've never had any experience with the ring. I can't take birthcontrol so hubby got snipped :-\

pihlaja
05 Nov 2010, 07:09
I don't know about the ring because I can't take "combination contraceptive pills" (my translator website haven't got too wide range of vocabulary in this kind of matters :D). I mean pills that have both estrogen and progesterone. That's because my grandma has died to thrombosis AND I have had aural migraine. So I take minipills, which have only progesterone and they haven't made contraceptive rings which only had progesterone.. But i wish that would be an option, because it sucks to take a pill everyday. (of course I could take a two-years-lasting progesterone capsule to my arm.... but I don't like the idea. :D)

Sin
05 Nov 2010, 07:21
I'm on the pill so I honestly haven't a clue.. actually I had to good the nuvaring to find out what it was!! this is what the internet says on the subject of side effects


The common side effects reported by NuvaRing® users are:

■Vaginal infections and irritation
■Vaginal secretion
■Headache
■Weight gain
■Nausea
In addition to the risks and side effects listed above, users of combination hormonal birth control methods have reported the following side effects:

■Vomiting
■Change in appetite
■Abdominal cramps and bloating
■Breast tenderness or enlargement
■Irregular vaginal bleeding or spotting
■Changes in menstrual cycle
■Temporary infertility after treatment
■Fluid retention (edema)
■Spotty darkening of the skin, particularly on the face
■Rash
■Weight changes
■Depression
■Intolerance to contact lenses
■Nervousness
■Dizziness
■Loss of scalp hair


but this is all stuff you've probably already found yourself.. to be honest it sounds uncomfortable to me :P

volcaniclastic
05 Nov 2010, 07:38
I'm on the pill so I honestly haven't a clue.. actually I had to good the nuvaring to find out what it was!! this is what the internet says on the subject of side effects

but this is all stuff you've probably already found yourself.. to be honest it sounds uncomfortable to me :P


"Loss of Scalp Hair"?

Raphaeline
05 Nov 2010, 07:49
I have only had one person mention the Nuvaring to me, and it was a story about an allergic reaction, so it's not pleasant. Unfortunately, I have nothing useful :-X

perzephone
05 Nov 2010, 07:51
"Loss of Scalp Hair"?


Most birth control that has a high androgen factor (e.g., male hormones) has this potential side effect. I was on Lo-Ovral for years & it started giving me male pattern baldness... so no more Lo-Ovral.

volcaniclastic
05 Nov 2010, 07:58
Most birth control that has a high androgen factor (e.g., male hormones) has this potential side effect. I was on Lo-Ovral for years & it started giving me male pattern baldness... so no more Lo-Ovral.


good gods.

All the more reason for me never to use birth control (which I don't, nor have ever even tried)

Sin
05 Nov 2010, 08:03
good gods.

All the more reason for me never to use birth control (which I don't, nor have ever even tried)


actually you know what... This is putting me off birth control now.. xD I've already had to watch aload of my hair fall out once.. I wouldn't want to see it happening again perminently :(

pihlaja
05 Nov 2010, 08:04
good gods.

All the more reason for me never to use birth control (which I don't, nor have ever even tried)


Yeah, but the point is that if you get side effects you change the pills, not try to suffer the side effects. :P Because it really depends on the person and the pill mark if you're getting the side effects or not and also if they have both estrogen and progesterone or just the second one. Same hormone but different pills and you might react compeletely differently. I've changed mine once because the previous ones made me grouchy.

Also one point in NuvaRing is that because it's changed once a month, the amount of hormones stay more stable and because of that you're supposed to get less side effects than with pills taken once per day. (Btw, i've heard two of my friends praise it and that's why I would have liked to test something similar)

volcaniclastic
05 Nov 2010, 08:18
Yeah, but the point is that if you get side effects you change the pills, not try to suffer the side effects. :P Because it really depends on the person and the pill mark if you're getting the side effects or not and also if they have both estrogen and progesterone or just the second one. Same hormone but different pills and you might react compeletely differently. I've changed mine once because the previous ones made me grouchy.

Also one point in NuvaRing is that because it's changed once a month, the amount of hormones stay more stable and because of that you're supposed to get less side effects than with pills taken once per day. (Btw, i've heard two of my friends praise it and that's why I would have liked to test something similar)


Every woman in my family who takes birth control needs to compliment it with anti-GO CRAZY pills, regardless of brand. So I've basically vowed to never try them. That besides, no matter how I look at it, they aren't natural.

pihlaja
05 Nov 2010, 08:24
Every woman in my family who takes birth control needs to compliment it with anti-GO CRAZY pills, regardless of brand. So I've basically vowed to never try them.


Okay, i guess that's an acceptable reason. :P


That besides, no matter how I look at it, they aren't natural.

Well.. yeah.. that sucks to be honest. But I think it's a less bad thing to take them something like 5 years of your life (time you're having a serious relationship but not babies) than being afraid all the time of getting pregnant (especially with my extremely non-stable menstruation cycle). After (hopefully) having babies some day I think I'm gonna get a coil.

volcaniclastic
05 Nov 2010, 08:25
Okay, i guess that's an acceptable reason. :P

Well.. yeah.. that sucks to be honest. But I think it's a less bad thing to take them something like 5 years of your life (time you're having a serious relationship but not babies) than being afraid all the time of getting pregnant (especially with my extremely non-stable menstruation cycle). After (hopefully) having babies some day I think I'm gonna get a coil.


What's a coil?

pihlaja
05 Nov 2010, 08:40
What's a coil?


Ops.. Sorry, i think i used a wrong word. :D That's what the online dictionary said but...

This is what i ment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intrauterine_device

(Dictionary says "a coil: Common name for any intra-uterine contraceptive device (Abbreviation: IUD)-the first IUDs were coil-shaped.")

volcaniclastic
05 Nov 2010, 08:47
Ops.. Sorry, i think i used a wrong word. :D That's what the online dictionary said but...

This is what i ment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intrauterine_device

(Dictionary says "a coil: Common name for any intra-uterine contraceptive device (Abbreviation: IUD)-the first IUDs were coil-shaped.")


Ohhh...

See, I'm grossed out by the idea of putting something up there and leaving it for so long. I guess it works for some, though.

pihlaja
05 Nov 2010, 08:54
I think I've got used to the idea since i've known so many women who have done that and been pleased about not needing to worry about taking pills, changing rings etc. :D But I've heard it's better not to have it before you've given birth babies. For some reson. Can't remember why, though.

perzephone
05 Nov 2010, 09:00
That besides, no matter how I look at it, they aren't natural.


They're perfectly natural - many birth control hormones are obtained from plants like yams and a type of pea (can't recall which species off the top of my head). Women have been using one form of hormonal birth control or another for thousands of years.

Until I get my hysterectomy, I'm staying on some form of hormonal birth control because I can't stand the wide array of completely hideous symptoms that the PCOS causes (and they have the added bonus of no baby making). I change pills up every couple of years because they stop being as effective. The Lo-Ovral was good to me for almost 10 years, but the hair loss in year 8 or 9 or so kind of put an end to that beautiful relationship. I'm like, yeah, I'm going to break out, have sore boobs, horrible cramps, bleed erratically and with no rhyme or reason... but I won't be bald.

Right now I'm on a low-dosage partial-month pill that uses strictly progesterone. It controls some of the symptoms like breaking out, boob pain, and for the first couple of months it controlled the erratic bleeding - but I'm 9 months in and my cycles are getting weird again, so I may need to up the dosage.

Amber
05 Nov 2010, 09:56
I'm still trying to talk my dr into a tubaligation but since I'm only 32 they are hesitant. They know I can't take BC so that's why Hubby had the vasectomy but his last sperm check a couple months ago showed small amounts of sperm and the urologist is concerned that it could be growing back (rare but does happen).

I'm compleatly and utterly DONE having children. I hope the Dr's agree!

thalassa
05 Nov 2010, 10:56
But i wish that would be an option, because it sucks to take a pill everyday. (of course I could take a two-years-lasting progesterone capsule to my arm.... but I don't like the idea. :D)


I have implanon...the three year stick in my arm. I love it.




I think I've got used to the idea since i've known so many women who have done that and been pleased about not needing to worry about taking pills, changing rings etc. :D But I've heard it's better not to have it before you've given birth babies. For some reson. Can't remember why, though.


It has to do with a higher rate of expulsion due to the shape and tone of uterine muscle. Baby stretches all that out, so it stays in there better.

(for people that don't want hormonal BC, you can get a copper IUD)




That besides, no matter how I look at it, they aren't natural.


So...when are you going to pop that baby out and start nursing for five years? :o After all, thats "natural". :P

Medusa
05 Nov 2010, 12:31
Every woman in my family who takes birth control needs to compliment it with anti-GO CRAZY pills, regardless of brand. So I've basically vowed to never try them. That besides, no matter how I look at it, they aren't natural.

My friend has the same problem. She had to take anti depressants with her bc pills. So she thought the nuvaring would be better since it's a lower dose of hormones. She's just having the hardest time with contraception. She gets alot of constant bleeding that just never really stops. She gets her period. Then she sorta mimics me then right after me...

Oddly with my heart and Diabetes I pretty much can't take any bc.

Maythe
05 Nov 2010, 14:13
Hmm this thread makes me want to ask something... I was on a combi pill, getting horrible headaches. Switched to a mini pill and, off the top of my head, that may have coincided with becoming depressed...? Hmm...So if depression is a possible side effect of BC, is it more likely with combined or mini?

Either way the case for MrK getting the snip just gets stronger and stronger!

Medusa
05 Nov 2010, 14:26
Hmm this thread makes me want to ask something... I was on a combi pill, getting horrible headaches. Switched to a mini pill and, off the top of my head, that may have coincided with becoming depressed...? Hmm...So if depression is a possible side effect of BC, is it more likely with combined or mini?

Either way the case for MrK getting the snip just gets stronger and stronger!

Younger girls are known to have the side effect of depression when taking a strong progesterone birth control.

Dez
05 Nov 2010, 15:21
Medusa, I had NuvaRing for a bit(before I discovered I shouldn't have hormonal birth control) and I really liked it. I seemed to have a slightly higher chance of yeast infections, but I think that was as much a combination of having something in there, and the awful synthetic material my underwear used to be made of.

Currently using a copper IUD. Yes, it kinda hurts to get it in there, but it's been super easy, and no problems other then a bit of spotting for the first few months.

Maythe
06 Nov 2010, 08:44
That's interesting, thanks Medusa

Ravenix
07 Nov 2010, 14:38
I have implanon...the three year stick in my arm. I love it.


Gah, you and your normal body. My body hated the implant. I mean it was a GREAT contraceptive- in that I bled almost constantly for the three months the sodding thing was in. ¬¬ The doctors wanted it out sooner, but the sexual health clinic pretty much made me keep it in 'to see if it settles'. Then they stuck me on Microgynon (which is one of the worst pills for side effects) for the week before my implant was due to come out, to keep me protected through the whole process. I was so ill after two days - nauseous, headachey, generally feeling crap- that my Dad made me stop taking the pills. And to top it all off, the woman in the clinic actually SHOUTED at me for stopping the Pill b/c I wasn't going to be protected for a week- as if I'm some kind of nymphomaniac, I mean me and my bf didn't actually have sex for the first time until about a month later. So I never went there agian and just listened to the qualified health professionals, who put me on Cilest. And now I'm fine. ^_^

I wouldn't fancy having anything in my 'lady garden' (lol) though, like a coil or anything like that. I dunno why, the idea just kind of creeps me out XD.

yukanaoe
08 Nov 2010, 06:23
i heart my IUD :)

DanieMarie
08 Nov 2010, 06:41
I used to have a thread about this before, but does anyone here have endometriosis? If so, has anyone had a laparoscopy?

I think I might have to get one. I've tried all sorts of different pills but I keep getting cramps and it just gets worse after I've been on a pill for a while. Like, it will start to be better for a while but then it just gets bad again. And not being on the pill (or hormonal birth control) is NOT an option, because the times I've tried that...well I think the first time when I went off really contributed to my current situation, and I had a gap a couple of months ago because I couldn't get a gyno appointment for a new perscription until after I'd started my cycle....both times were PURE HELL with cramps, and I had my period literally half the time (usually a full week of bleeding, on a 21 day cycle...yep...)

Raphaeline
08 Nov 2010, 11:47
Ohhh...

See, I'm grossed out by the idea of putting something up there and leaving it for so long. I guess it works for some, though.


The very concept of birth control makes me a little nauseous anyway.

ETA: I mean the pill and medicines/items that alter a woman's cycle. Not things like condoms and diaphragms.

Almost_lost
08 Nov 2010, 12:27
Gah, you and your normal body. My body hated the implant. I mean it was a GREAT contraceptive- in that I bled almost constantly for the three months the sodding thing was in. ¬¬ The doctors wanted it out sooner, but the sexual health clinic pretty much made me keep it in 'to see if it settles'. Then they stuck me on Microgynon (which is one of the worst pills for side effects) for the week before my implant was due to come out, to keep me protected through the whole process. I was so ill after two days - nauseous, headachey, generally feeling crap- that my Dad made me stop taking the pills. And to top it all off, the woman in the clinic actually SHOUTED at me for stopping the Pill b/c I wasn't going to be protected for a week- as if I'm some kind of nymphomaniac, I mean me and my bf didn't actually have sex for the first time until about a month later. So I never went there agian and just listened to the qualified health professionals, who put me on Cilest. And now I'm fine. ^_^

Im too scared to get the implant, plus, my cycle was all over the place before i started taking microgynon, so i think i'd have to take the pill as well as have the implant so it just seems abit moot to have something stuck in my arm when im protected with the pill.
As for being the worst one for side effects, i didnt have any at first, ive been on it for 5 years, i am starting ot get headaches and feeling crap but i dont know if thats die to circumstance or to the pill. Anyhow, i like being on this pill cause my sisters on it too, so when if either of us runs out before we can get to the doctors we just steal a months pack from eachother.

DanieMarie
08 Nov 2010, 13:39
The very concept of birth control makes me a little nauseous anyway.

ETA: I mean the pill and medicines/items that alter a woman's cycle. Not things like condoms and diaphragms.


At least you don't -have- to alter your cycle. Mine's so messed up on its own :(

I hate my body a lot sometimes. Because it clearly hates me.

pihlaja
08 Nov 2010, 13:48
At least you don't -have- to alter your cycle. Mine's so messed up on its own :(


Mine was very messed up too.. I never knew if the cycle was gonna be 1 month + 1 week or 1,5 months or nearly two months.. Well, now that I take mini-pills I don't have a cycle at all (uhm.. well, in theory I do have, at least that's what they say, it's just not showing anywhere). But I don't really know which is better (or worse), because now I don't have to be cautious about 'those days' but my skin gets quite bad when my body doesn't purify itself once in a month or two.

Raphaeline
08 Nov 2010, 15:54
At least you don't -have- to alter your cycle. Mine's so messed up on its own :(

I hate my body a lot sometimes. Because it clearly hates me.


Not at all. I've got PCOS so my cycles are wonky, too. Two years ago, I was having a period every three or four months. After I gave birth, they were perfectly predictable - for about three months. Then I didn't have one again for about seven months, even after I stopped breastfeeding him at four months (not voluntarily). Now for some reason they're closer together and the last three have been exactly 26 days. WTF?! ::)

There's just something about tricking the body into not going through it's cycles that freaks me out mentally. I'm not against it or anything, it's just that the concept kind of weirds me out.

Veronica
08 Nov 2010, 17:23
I only have "my time of the month" every four months now. It's because my hormones get so out of whack when I do have it that I'm literally crazy for 3 days. My docs have tried everything, I've done homeopathic, and herbs and all that, but I think what I really need is just to have some alone time during those days. So for now I just skip it and every 4th month or so I go ahead and deal with it, and give major warning to everyone out there. I still have mild symptoms but that's all.

My stepdaughter started out on the nuvaring and she loved it. She moved out on her own and stopped using it in favor of something cheaper, but the ring was really better for her because she wouldn't have to remember it every day.

DanieMarie
09 Nov 2010, 00:18
Not at all. I've got PCOS so my cycles are wonky, too. Two years ago, I was having a period every three or four months. After I gave birth, they were perfectly predictable - for about three months. Then I didn't have one again for about seven months, even after I stopped breastfeeding him at four months (not voluntarily). Now for some reason they're closer together and the last three have been exactly 26 days. WTF?! ::)

There's just something about tricking the body into not going through it's cycles that freaks me out mentally. I'm not against it or anything, it's just that the concept kind of weirds me out.


That sucks :-/
And I totally agree....you shouldn't do anything to your body that you're not comfortable with!

DanieMarie
09 Nov 2010, 04:44
I got a gyno appointment for tomorrow, which is a little earlier than I planned, but usually I called and it takes like a month for them to get you in, and I need to figure out what I'm doing with the pill I'm on because my prescription has only one more month left. I might start my period tomorrow though, which might be both good and bad, because on one hand it's hard to see anything with the bleeding, but on the other it should just be sort of spotting and since I'm starting to cramp up a lot already and I'm all swollen maybe she'll be able to see if anything is going on (or not). I might also get on the track to getting a laparoscopy sooner.
I'm surprised they could see me tomorrow. Someone must have cancelled their appointment.

Madness
10 Nov 2010, 09:04
Every time I see this thread, I read "Women health issues (The pubic version)" and snicker.

That is all.

Amber
10 Nov 2010, 10:40
Every time I see this thread, I read "Women health issues (The pubic version)" and snicker.

That is all.


I did too LOL

Ravenix
13 Nov 2010, 14:06
Im too scared to get the implant, plus, my cycle was all over the place before i started taking microgynon, so i think i'd have to take the pill as well as have the implant so it just seems abit moot to have something stuck in my arm when im protected with the pill.
As for being the worst one for side effects, i didnt have any at first, ive been on it for 5 years, i am starting ot get headaches and feeling crap but i dont know if thats die to circumstance or to the pill. Anyhow, i like being on this pill cause my sisters on it too, so when if either of us runs out before we can get to the doctors we just steal a months pack from eachother.


Oh I know it works fine for some people ^_^ Just in my own experience, and from talking to my mates who started on Microgynon, they all had a crappy time with it too. I dunno, maybe it's just us Geordie lasses! XD

Celest
13 Nov 2010, 18:59
I used an IUD for several months after my second child was born, but the bleeding was so heavy that the Dr. removed it.

After baby #3 I had my tubes tied, it was a c-section, so I figured they might as well while they were in there :P.

Now, I am still getting horribly heavy periods and I am hoping to get the lining of my uterus lasered off. Anyone had that done?
any advise?

perzephone
13 Nov 2010, 19:41
Now, I am still getting horribly heavy periods and I am hoping to get the lining of my uterus lasered off. Anyone had that done?
any advise?


From the research I've done for myself, if you have endometriosis or PCOS, ablation isn't recommended. The uterine lining can grow back & scarring from the ablation causes complications in endo & PCOS.

If you're going to get it done, there's a new procedure using freezing instead of heat that looks promising:

http://www.advancedobgynassociates.com/her-option-menses.htm

thalassa
14 Nov 2010, 05:03
Now, I am still getting horribly heavy periods and I am hoping to get the lining of my uterus lasered off. Anyone had that done?
any advise?


My mom did...I'll have to ask her how bad it was, I wasn't around at the time, I think I was deployed or underway.

DanieMarie
14 Nov 2010, 06:46
From the research I've done for myself, if you have endometriosis or PCOS, ablation isn't recommended. The uterine lining can grow back & scarring from the ablation causes complications in endo & PCOS.

If you're going to get it done, there's a new procedure using freezing instead of heat that looks promising:

http://www.advancedobgynassociates.com/her-option-menses.htm


Yeah I was told this as well. They still do it, and try to control it growing back, but it still can.

As far as I know though, nothing has been totally effective in completely stopping it from growing back. But I have yet to go to the endometriosis clinic (I've been referred to an endometriosis clinic and research center for a laparoscopy and then going from there). So maybe there's stuff I don't know about (yet).

Celest
14 Nov 2010, 11:43
From the research I've done for myself, if you have endometriosis or PCOS, ablation isn't recommended. The uterine lining can grow back & scarring from the ablation causes complications in endo & PCOS.

If you're going to get it done, there's a new procedure using freezing instead of heat that looks promising:

http://www.advancedobgynassociates.com/her-option-menses.htm


Thanks! (for the link)
I don't have endometriosos or PCOS, just really heavy, painfull periods . Because of my age, the lining is less likely to grow back but I just can't deal with it anymore. I have had to deal with this for over 30 years now, (minus pregnancies and nursing time) and i have just had enough. I will ask the doc about the freezing for sure!

Medusa
14 Nov 2010, 23:51
Thanks! (for the link)
I don't have endometriosos or PCOS, just really heavy, painfull periods . Because of my age, the lining is less likely to grow back but I just can't deal with it anymore. I have had to deal with this for over 30 years now, (minus pregnancies and nursing time) and i have just had enough. I will ask the doc about the freezing for sure!

I might have skipped previous posts about this. You know I keep seeing those commercials for heavy bleeding. Something with a chic sitting and it's raining rose petals. Have you tried medication first?

Celest
15 Nov 2010, 04:13
I might have skipped previous posts about this. You know I keep seeing those commercials for heavy bleeding. Something with a chic sitting and it's raining rose petals. Have you tried medication first?

I am not sure what medication that add is for, but I have been on several oral contraceptives over the years and nothing really helps. Usually when I am on the pill I bleed for the whole month, it is light, but always there. I go see the gyno tomorrow so hopefully I will have some answers soon .

perzephone
15 Nov 2010, 10:31
I might have skipped previous posts about this. You know I keep seeing those commercials for heavy bleeding. Something with a chic sitting and it's raining rose petals. Have you tried medication first?


You might be thinking of Lysteda:

http://www.lysteda.com/about_lysteda.aspx

It's tranexamic acid, which is used to stop prolonged bleeding. It's been sold as Cyklokapron for hemophilia, oral surgery, trauma & nosebleeds.

Medusa
15 Nov 2010, 11:56
You might be thinking of Lysteda:

http://www.lysteda.com/about_lysteda.aspx

It's tranexamic acid, which is used to stop prolonged bleeding. It's been sold as Cyklokapron for hemophilia, oral surgery, trauma & nosebleeds.

yep yep. That's it. Thanks!

Celest
15 Nov 2010, 11:57
You might be thinking of Lysteda:

http://www.lysteda.com/about_lysteda.aspx

It's tranexamic acid, which is used to stop prolonged bleeding. It's been sold as Cyklokapron for hemophilia, oral surgery, trauma & nosebleeds.


again, thanks!
I have many options to ask about now :)

Dez
19 Nov 2010, 13:16
Ok...I've waited to post this, because it's a little embarrassing, but the girls are unhappy. And when they're unhappy, I'm unhappy.

I started playing with a local orchestra last September. It's a lot of fun, but we don't get payed(shucks!). I'm hoping to branch out from there, to either teaching, or getting involved in some musical group(s) that *do* get payed. Thing is, I'm a lot more busty then I was back when I last played regularly (after getting married and having kids went from a small B up to and E or even F, and am now in D-DD territory). If playing sitting down, I *need* to sit right on the edge of my seat, given my style of playing, changing that is not an option.

I've found, though, that after a two-hour rehearsal, my upper back is KILLING ME. We played the concert on the 10th, two hours with no breaks, and I felt like I was going to scream.

Getting new bras is obviously on the agenda--I'm still wearing some I got over a year and 20+ pounds ago. But I can't get them right away...until sometime after Christmas we're going to be strapped to get more then diapers, and neither me or L is getting any purchased presents.

I was wondering if a corset might potentially help...not tight-laced, but just to provide a little extra back support.

Ideas?

I don't have orchestra start up again until the first Wed of January, and no concert until March, but I'd rather start trying to get a grip on this now...particularly because my back was sore for the better part of a week after the concert, and I don't want to give myself some serious problems :P

newgirl24
19 Nov 2010, 13:41
I use the nuvaring. LOVE IT. Out of sight, out of mind.

I haven't gotten any side effects.

And either I'm infertile or it works...

tigergypsy
19 Nov 2010, 13:47
I worked with someone who had breast reduction surgery. She had such back problems that insurance even covered it. She said it was the best thing she ever did. I don't know what size she was before surgery, but now I think she's a full C and very happy. And recovery time was about a couple of weeks, not lifting anything heavy, things like that.

I don't know if that's something you could do or not, but it's an idea.

Amber
19 Nov 2010, 13:53
I worked with someone who had breast reduction surgery. She had such back problems that insurance even covered it. She said it was the best thing she ever did. I don't know what size she was before surgery, but now I think she's a full C and very happy. And recovery time was about a couple of weeks, not lifting anything heavy, things like that.

I don't know if that's something you could do or not, but it's an idea.


I had a breast reduction in 2001 and it was the best thing I ever did. I went from an F to a full D (I have always had large breast) but I can tell you the back pain immediatly went away. And my insurance covered it because I had the option of a breast reduction or a back surgery.

But posture is the key to keeping the pain away. I played in band all through school so I know how you feel being "stuck" in a certain position for awhile. It is agonizing!

Medusa
19 Nov 2010, 13:57
Sanz getting the bras...can you find a seat pillow that will help you sit up better and support your back? Or back exercises via youtube? I found great stretching videos for my foot ailment and it's worked wonders.

thalassa
19 Nov 2010, 14:01
I was wondering if a corset might potentially help...not tight-laced, but just to provide a little extra back support.

Ideas?

I don't have orchestra start up again until the first Wed of January, and no concert until March, but I'd rather start trying to get a grip on this now...particularly because my back was sore for the better part of a week after the concert, and I don't want to give myself some serious problems :P


First off, I'd recommend an exercise ball. Sit at that at home, instead of a desk chair when you are at the computer--you don't even have to do exercises with it (but that will help too). It engages your abs and back--which work together. To have a good back, you need good abs...

Second, yes...the corset will help because it forces good posture while you are wearing it. Which means you are working those muscles. Just get one that fits properly because chasing kids in a corset is a chore.

Third, I'd recommend looking for back exercises you can do at home on the net---yoga poses and pilates are good, also...anything targeting the abs as well...since its a whole body core thing. Belly dancing works there too, if you want to add in movement...but the yoga is nice because you can add in meditation and kill two birds with one stone.

If you get to a point where you can afford it, swimming is really good core work--particularly just kicking with a kickboard.

Dez
19 Nov 2010, 15:03
Exactly what I was wondering. Thanks you guys!

I didn't even think of exercises or some sort of seat pillow.

As for breast reduction...I'd love to get one eventually. Given how much I've already lost from my cleavage, though, I'm thinking that by the time I could actually afford to get one, it would have more to do with pinning them back up where they belong then actually reducing mass. Could be wrong, though, especially if I start having regular back pain associated with the closest thing I have to a profession. :P

perzephone
19 Nov 2010, 18:06
I was wondering if a corset might potentially help...not tight-laced, but just to provide a little extra back support.

Ideas?


Ace bandages!

I got tig bitties seemingly overnight when I was 11 & I was in band, playing the flute. I tried every bra available, from sports bras to those old-fashioned Playtex rocket-launchers & nothing relieved my upper back & shoulder pain.

My gym coach suggested Ace bandages - getting a couple of them & binding my boobs by - the Ace bandages have the elasticity you need to move & help support your muscles without letting your muscles become dependent on them (which can be a drawback of corsets). I had to experiment a little with which wrapping style worked best, but it was a lifesaver during Pep rallies & games all through high school.

LadyGarnetRose
29 Mar 2011, 23:36
For the ladies looking for a permanent birth control solution, Essure (http://www.essure.com/) is a non surgical tubal ligation. It though is PERMANENT there is no going back after this (except in-vitro).

FantasyWitch
11 Jul 2011, 11:33
Hey! I have a new question.

I've never had acne before in my life. I'll get one or two spots at that time of the month but nothing more than that, but suddenly I have this really bad break-out on my face. It isn't the time of the month and I haven't changed my diet lately or anything. I am really confused. I'm thinking it might be one of three things:

1. I've started swimming a lot more again and that could be drying out my skin.
2. My contraceptive implant is due to be changed in October, so that could be causing a great deal of hormonal changes.
3. I have been stressing about my work for the upcoming exhibition.

Or a mix of all three. But my question is how to take care of it. I know it isn't acne, but I've never had this many spots before EVER and I don't want to start. My mum has pretty bad adult acne and the idea of following her into having acne horrifies me. So any help in dealing with this break out would be very helpful.

Amber
11 Jul 2011, 13:06
Stress can bring it about as well as swimming drying out your skin (at least in my experience). I have good luck with using witch hazel for a mild astringent on my face every morning and night and I dab tea tree oil on the pimples themselves. It seems to help bring them down at least

perzephone
11 Jul 2011, 20:49
Hey! I have a new question.

I've never had acne before in my life. I'll get one or two spots at that time of the month but nothing more than that, but suddenly I have this really bad break-out on my face. It isn't the time of the month and I haven't changed my diet lately or anything. I am really confused. I'm thinking it might be one of three things:

1. I've started swimming a lot more again and that could be drying out my skin.
2. My contraceptive implant is due to be changed in October, so that could be causing a great deal of hormonal changes.
3. I have been stressing about my work for the upcoming exhibition.

Or a mix of all three. But my question is how to take care of it. I know it isn't acne, but I've never had this many spots before EVER and I don't want to start. My mum has pretty bad adult acne and the idea of following her into having acne horrifies me. So any help in dealing with this break out would be very helpful.

It's hard to find a balanced treatment for regular ol' acne break-outs. Dry skin = irritation, irritation means your skin produces more oil to protect it, more oil = more acne. And I know the knee-jerk reaction to having oily skin is to get rid of the excess oil by cleaning the crap out of it. If you exfoliate often, stop during active breakouts - it causes further damage and can spread bacteria to unaffected pores. Same goes for regular face-washing - if you're washing your face more than once a day it can also make your face try to protect itself with more oil. When you do wash or shower, try not to use super-hot water on your face. Basically, you want to avoid anything that will make your skin panic & produce more oil.

- Salicylic acid products usually help, but depending on the other ingredients they can dry your skin out.

- Witch hazel can help, but most of the time, commercially, it's in an alcohol base, which will dry your face. If you can get loose cut witch hazel from a health food store, you can make a tea & use it as a facial wash. Horsetail is also good as a tea, and so is buckthorn, which is usually sold in lotion form for varicose veins.

- Touching your own face throughout the day, which people do without realizing it, is really bad. I notice that after a couple of nights of helping on the phones at work, I'll have pimples that match where the phone has rested on the side of my ear and next to my mouth. Yummy!

- Some people have luck with using plain yogurt (with no additives) as a cold cream - the cultures in yogurt can help balance out your skin's natural bacteria levels and it's not a drying agent. It doesn't work for me, but I have seen it work for other people.

If your acne (or your mom's) is accompanied by flushing on your cheeks, forehead & chin, it could be rosacea - I've got it, experimented with just about every treatment on the planet and it's done nothing but cost me money. I'm just hoping I don't end up w/a nose like WC Fields. I'm actually thinking about facial cosmetic tattooing to cover or lessen some of the constant redness :P According to the dermatologists I've seen, rosacea isn't a 'disease', it's a 'complexion type', and there is no 'cure', only things that can treat the most visible symptoms.

Medusa
12 Jul 2011, 00:40
I've noticed some breakouts only on my chin...where my chin hits the water in the pool.

DanieMarie
21 Jul 2011, 13:36
I had another random mood swing today. But luckily I just got publicly angry at the weather. I'm not 100% sure if it was that or just no-sun blues (which can sometimes make me equally crazy, and it's REALLY dark as well as cold. The clouds in this city are black and awful), but I feel crampy and weird so maybe. I'm not due to get my period until the week after next but I'm not on the pill right now so it could easily be a week early and here on monday, and I'm going through some vicious non-pill pms.....

Or maybe black clouds are making me crazy. I don't know. I almost feel more unstable when the weather is like this in the summer than winter. Maybe because what gets me through the winter is knowing that summer will come, but if summer doesn't come, it's just going to be ages of dark and horrible after :(

FantasyWitch
23 Jul 2011, 05:39
I've noticed some breakouts only on my chin...where my chin hits the water in the pool.

I'm feeling it must be the pool water for me too. But I am using some witch hazel stuff that the chemist recommended and it seems to have helped.

thalassa
24 Jul 2011, 07:30
The chlorine messes with your skin's natural chemistry, dries out your skin and all-round makes you more susceptible to breakouts.

...I'd recommend a moisturizing cleanser in general, but specifically after your swim, and a moisturizer in general.

Hawkfeathers
24 Jul 2011, 15:25
Pool water will definitely make you break out - rinse it off with fresh water ASAP after exiting the pool. Also, if you get sweaty and it dries on your skin, the stuff that comes out of your pores & tries to get back in will break you out. When I do my long walks in hot weather, I bring along both damp and dry paper towels, and mop off my face a few times along the route, as needed.

On another note, I personally think BC pills are a dangerous health hazard. Mess with your hormones, and you change who you are. Plus, they do not protect against diseases at all. And, when they first came out, they were much higher-dose than needed, women went off them & had babies right away, with hormone-affecting chemicals washing over the fetus, and we had a huge surge in the gay population.........just saying. Don't get mad at me. I'm not the least bit anti-gay, and this is just a casual, anecdotal observation, not backed by anything scientific.

perzephone
24 Jul 2011, 17:52
On another note, I personally think BC pills are a dangerous health hazard. Mess with your hormones, and you change who you are. Plus, they do not protect against diseases at all. And, when they first came out, they were much higher-dose than needed, women went off them & had babies right away, with hormone-affecting chemicals washing over the fetus, and we had a huge surge in the gay population.........just saying. Don't get mad at me. I'm not the least bit anti-gay, and this is just a casual, anecdotal observation, not backed by anything scientific.

I've been on various types, strengths & dosages of birth control pills since I was 12 (and I'm 37 now) - and I'm the same basic person. Women have been using various types of plant hormones and substances to prevent conception for thousands of years. The science behind it has come a long way since the 60s - most birth control pills now are extremely low dosage, using hormones that a woman's body produces naturally, with very few side effects, and the biggest danger involves women who smoke while on them.

Homosexuality has also been around for thousands of years, millions if you count the other animal populations, and has absolutely nothing to do with birth control. I knew I liked other girls (and boys) by the time I was 10 - before I even got on birth control.

Do yourself a favor and do some in-depth research before spreading more ridiculous rumors and conjectures.

Hawkfeathers
24 Jul 2011, 18:08
I've been on various types, strengths & dosages of birth control pills since I was 12 (and I'm 37 now) - and I'm the same basic person. Women have been using various types of plant hormones and substances to prevent conception for thousands of years. The science behind it has come a long way since the 60s - most birth control pills now are extremely low dosage, using hormones that a woman's body produces naturally, with very few side effects, and the biggest danger involves women who smoke while on them.

Homosexuality has also been around for thousands of years, millions if you count the other animal populations, and has absolutely nothing to do with birth control. I knew I liked other girls (and boys) by the time I was 10 - before I even got on birth control.

Do yourself a favor and do some in-depth research before spreading more ridiculous rumors and conjectures.

Sorry you think it's ridiculous that hormones shape the person. I clearly stated that it was just my opinion, and anecdotal. It has nothing to do with the homosexual person having been on the pill, but rather their mother, maybe even their grandmother. Chemicals in the environment are changing people in many ways.

Medusa
25 Jul 2011, 01:51
Sorry you think it's ridiculous that hormones shape the person. I clearly stated that it was just my opinion, and anecdotal. It has nothing to do with the homosexual person having been on the pill, but rather their mother, maybe even their grandmother. Chemicals in the environment are changing people in many ways.

I thought it was pretty ridiculous. Of course everyone knows it was the boys playing with dolls that made them gay. Duh.

FantasyWitch
25 Jul 2011, 02:40
On another note, I personally think BC pills are a dangerous health hazard. Mess with your hormones, and you change who you are. Plus, they do not protect against diseases at all. And, when they first came out, they were much higher-dose than needed, women went off them & had babies right away, with hormone-affecting chemicals washing over the fetus, and we had a huge surge in the gay population.........just saying. Don't get mad at me. I'm not the least bit anti-gay, and this is just a casual, anecdotal observation, not backed by anything scientific.


Sorry you think it's ridiculous that hormones shape the person. I clearly stated that it was just my opinion, and anecdotal. It has nothing to do with the homosexual person having been on the pill, but rather their mother, maybe even their grandmother. Chemicals in the environment are changing people in many ways.

Sorry that was kind of a dumb thing to come out with.
Birth control does have side effects, but so do all drugs we take, from pain killers to diabetes meds. ALSO if you were given any sex ed at school you know that birth control does not protect from STI and HIV, but if you are in a long term relationship and on birth control then that isn't (or rather shouldn't be) an issue. You obviously don't know much about birth control. Condoms are also flawed, but you aren't ranting about them...

ALSO can you give us some links to evidence of your statement. Birth control= gay children? Hmm... Seems fishy to me. x

Dez
25 Jul 2011, 06:54
It's a rather interesting conjecture...but if that were the case, the first rush would have been in the 30's, born of flapper mothers. What about the huge underground gay culture during the late 19th Century, too? Seems to me much more like cultural changes in the 70's led to awareness of what had always been there.

I agree that we don't know what all playing with the bodies hormones does, and I'm very grateful that they've figured out how little actually needs to be in them. They're a bad choice for me because of clotting, but for many women they're an inexpensive source of birth control, and I'd much rather they made good use of it then avoided bc because of rumors.

Since being gay is primarily internal/emotional, rather then physical (no matter how many stereotypes imply otherwise), you might have more luck, Hawkfeathers, with an assertion that you wonder whether BC, like other environmental factors (plastics, pesticides, etc) are leading to more intersexed children. That is true, after all for animals like frogs (http://www.beyondpesticides.org/dailynewsblog/?p=323).

DanieMarie
25 Jul 2011, 09:11
I'd take the birth control side effects over the intense pain, irregular periods and insane mood swings I get without them any day. Hell, I've been off them for nearly 2 months because I needed to switch and couldn't get a gyno appointment until August 3, and now I might even have to postpone it because I need an ultrasound then and I might have my period, because it came a week late last time throwing off my cycle to when I wasn't originally supposed to have it. Anyway, I've been off the for a bit and even though the awfulness tends to build up, it's already awful. I dont' even have my period and I get cramps periodically, I get mood swings that ruin my day, there's no real telling when my period will come (21 days? 36 days? Dunno!) So I think the pill isn't bad for all people. It's certainly the better alternative for me. I'd rather "mess" with my body's natural cycle, which clearly hates my soul than deal with nature.

Hawkfeathers
25 Jul 2011, 09:54
One more time. I said it was anecdotal. I'm not ranting, or trying to prove a point, or even present a theory which could be supported. It's ANECDOTAL. Just an idea.
And BTW how anyone would arrive at the conclusion that I don't know much about bc is beyond me. I'm 54 and have no kids so I guess I figured something out LOL
It was not my intention to ruffle anyone's feathers.

perzephone
25 Jul 2011, 10:03
And BTW how anyone would arrive at the conclusion that I don't know much about bc is beyond me. I'm 54 and have no kids so I guess I figured something out LOL

Well, there's nothing on your profile that states your age, and the whole 'birth control leads to homosexuality' honestly sounds like something a teen-aged or young girl might believe. Kind of like 'you can't get pregnant the first time you have sex', or 'you can't get pregnant if he pulls out'.

Hawkfeathers
25 Jul 2011, 11:22
Well, there's nothing on your profile that states your age, and the whole 'birth control leads to homosexuality' honestly sounds like something a teen-aged or young girl might believe. Kind of like 'you can't get pregnant the first time you have sex', or 'you can't get pregnant if he pulls out'.

LOL Even as a teenager I never thought those things.
I believe rather strongly that modern-day pharmaceuticals, which includes bc pills, are not always the healthiest choice.
I also believe rather strongly that one's hormones determine who one is, in many ways, and that it is possible that residual bc pill effects in a pregnant woman could potentially affect a fetus and its hormonal development.
I'm not asking anyone else to believe those things. That's all, for this subject.

DanieMarie
25 Jul 2011, 12:29
I guess mine is just anecdotal too. On the flip side, even though I tend to be pretty critical of a lot of things, pharmaceuticals isn't one of them. I've had a lot of health problems in my (relatively short) life, and modern medicine has always been their to aid or even save my life. I can't think of one instance where medicine has harmed me (well, except for the two times I picked up staph in hospitals, but that's not medicine), but I can't even count the number of times it's helped or saved me.

Hawkfeathers
25 Jul 2011, 12:36
My biggest "women's health issue" was fibroids - I had horrible problems with them. I had a uterine artery embolism done 5 years ago and no more problems!

DanieMarie
25 Jul 2011, 12:39
I might have endometriosis. It's rough times but the pill makes it at least slightly better. The hormones make the overgrown endometrial tissue a little bit more at bay (though even with it's still worse than it was in my early 20's).

LadyGarnetRose
25 Jul 2011, 12:55
The "surge" in homosexuality wasn't the pill. It was the DSM removing homosexuality as a mental disorder that got people out of the closet when they realized that YES THEY WEREN'T CRAZY.

Adults in the 1970's didn't all of a sudden become gay because women in 1960 started taking the pill.

Hawkfeathers
25 Jul 2011, 13:09
I might have endometriosis. It's rough times but the pill makes it at least slightly better. The hormones make the overgrown endometrial tissue a little bit more at bay (though even with it's still worse than it was in my early 20's).
I understand that can be very painful.

perzephone
25 Jul 2011, 18:20
I believe rather strongly that modern-day pharmaceuticals, which includes bc pills, are not always the healthiest choice.

That's fine - but in so many cases, they're the most easily obtained and effective, especially when it comes to birth control. I could go out of my way and try to find various legumes, yams & herbs with pseudohormonal effects (and not just during their growing season), and then worry if the dosage is strong enough to a) alleviate the symptoms I get from PCOS and b) prevent pregnancy. Or I could buy a pill with analogues of those same hormones, at the same consistent level and dosage, all year 'round, and know that, in general, they will alleviate the symptoms and prevent pregnancy.

Kind of like, yes, willow bark, myrtle and other plants do have salicylic acid in them, and they will relieve minor aches and pains - but have you tasted that stuff? And you can't exactly coat a tea in an enteric coating for people who are sensitive to pure salicylic acid.

thalassa
26 Jul 2011, 07:43
...as someone that pretends to be a person from the 19th century on a regular basis, I would like to point out that most studies of the time (using primary documents) demonstrate that homosexuality was quite prevalent prior to hormonal birth control (and all things considered, I would hazard to guess *just* as prevalent, but not as publicly expressed). The difference is that it was described in different terminology, recognized within different social boundaries and roles, and often camouflaged by the "traditional" behavior of marriage and children (just as it is in certain religious groups today).

LadyGarnetRose
26 Jul 2011, 11:19
...as someone that pretends to be a person from the 19th century on a regular basis, I would like to point out that most studies of the time (using primary documents) demonstrate that homosexuality was quite prevalent prior to hormonal birth control (and all things considered, I would hazard to guess *just* as prevalent, but not as publicly expressed). The difference is that it was described in different terminology, recognized within different social boundaries and roles, and often camouflaged by the "traditional" behavior of marriage and children (just as it is in certain religious groups today).

Yup there's a whole group of people who cannot get over that homosexuality has always been. Not just during moments of "deviation" as some like to put it.

I miss civwar reenactment, hubby though is talking about SASS/CAS so might get to do it again :)

Juniper
21 Feb 2013, 13:56
I don't know if this fits but it's a Women's Health concern for me and I don't really know if this warrants it's own topic yet. If it turns out that it could, then I'll make the adjustments later.

Anyway... my question is this: Are there any foods that could possibly interfere with becoming pregnant? I know that there aren't any Birth Control foods or else women would be ALL OVER that instead of BC. Or to be more accurate - at least to my knowledge there aren't. But are there foods that could muddle things up enough to prevent conception, if the conditions were right? It's a weird question I just thought of and haven't had the time to research.
PS: I already know there are foods to avoid while pregnant, so DURING pregnancy isn't my concern. It's BEFORE that I'm wondering about.

Denarius
21 Feb 2013, 14:46
Does this help? (http://www.ifood.tv/blog/5-foods-with-contraceptive-properties)

thalassa
21 Feb 2013, 17:43
I don't know if this fits but it's a Women's Health concern for me and I don't really know if this warrants it's own topic yet. If it turns out that it could, then I'll make the adjustments later.

Anyway... my question is this: Are there any foods that could possibly interfere with becoming pregnant? I know that there aren't any Birth Control foods or else women would be ALL OVER that instead of BC. Or to be more accurate - at least to my knowledge there aren't. But are there foods that could muddle things up enough to prevent conception, if the conditions were right? It's a weird question I just thought of and haven't had the time to research.
PS: I already know there are foods to avoid while pregnant, so DURING pregnancy isn't my concern. It's BEFORE that I'm wondering about.

Stuff like caffeine can cause early enough miscarriage that you might not even realize you are pregnant yet. I think (if I remember the stats right), its overuse is indicated in some 50% of early miscarriages. I've also heard that soy products (if you drink soy milk, etc and have alot of soy in your diet) are a no-no, due to the fake estrogens. Foods with high nitrates (like hot dogs, bologna) might also affect fertility. And, don't take asprin or ibuprofen for the same reason as the caffeine.

iflewoverthecuckoosnest
21 Feb 2013, 18:21
...as someone that pretends to be a person from the 19th century on a regular basis, I would like to point out that most studies of the time (using primary documents) demonstrate that homosexuality was quite prevalent prior to hormonal birth control (and all things considered, I would hazard to guess *just* as prevalent, but not as publicly expressed). The difference is that it was described in different terminology, recognized within different social boundaries and roles, and often camouflaged by the "traditional" behavior of marriage and children (just as it is in certain religious groups today).

Yeah, I remember reading something about how lesbian relationships were quite common among married women back then. They were referred to as "romantic friends", I believe, and it was generally socially accepted.

Juniper
21 Feb 2013, 18:34
Stuff like caffeine can cause early enough miscarriage that you might not even realize you are pregnant yet. I think (if I remember the stats right), its overuse is indicated in some 50% of early miscarriages. I've also heard that soy products (if you drink soy milk, etc and have alot of soy in your diet) are a no-no, due to the fake estrogens. Foods with high nitrates (like hot dogs, bologna) might also affect fertility. And, don't take asprin or ibuprofen for the same reason as the caffeine.

Ah, well, I don't really drink much caffeine (coffee-products give me heartburn and I stopped drinking much soda pop years ago), or consume much soy and I hate hot dogs and bologna, lol. So I'm safe from all of them.

Maria de Luna
22 Feb 2013, 05:13
I don't know if this fits but it's a Women's Health concern for me and I don't really know if this warrants it's own topic yet. If it turns out that it could, then I'll make the adjustments later.

Anyway... my question is this: Are there any foods that could possibly interfere with becoming pregnant? I know that there aren't any Birth Control foods or else women would be ALL OVER that instead of BC. Or to be more accurate - at least to my knowledge there aren't. But are there foods that could muddle things up enough to prevent conception, if the conditions were right? It's a weird question I just thought of and haven't had the time to research.
PS: I already know there are foods to avoid while pregnant, so DURING pregnancy isn't my concern. It's BEFORE that I'm wondering about.I know a few things that can affect male fertility, more just reducing sperm count if there is too much fat in the diet, not balancing the right ammounts of protien and fatty acids, but I don't know as much about avoiding food to change female fertility, sorry.

B. de Corbin
22 Feb 2013, 05:30
Anyway... my question is this: Are there any foods that could possibly interfere with becoming pregnant? I know that there aren't any Birth Control foods or else women would be ALL OVER that instead of BC. Or to be more accurate - at least to my knowledge there aren't...

Here's a famous plant used for birth control (http://www.sisterzeus.com/Silphio.htm). It was so popular that it appears to now be extinct.

Also, I think I remember that sweet potatoes & yams are high in female hormone-like stuff - not sure how that would affect things, although...

OK - here's a linky quote:


Today, the birth-control pill is derived from true yams. Dr. John Lee, author of “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause,” explains how manufacturers take diosgenin from the Wild Mexican Yam to make progesterone. From that they create a substance called progestins ,the basis of birth control pills. (http://www.sweetpotatoblessings.com/diff.htm)

perzephone
22 Feb 2013, 07:30
I don't know if this fits but it's a Women's Health concern for me and I don't really know if this warrants it's own topic yet. If it turns out that it could, then I'll make the adjustments later.

Anyway... my question is this: Are there any foods that could possibly interfere with becoming pregnant? I know that there aren't any Birth Control foods or else women would be ALL OVER that instead of BC. Or to be more accurate - at least to my knowledge there aren't. But are there foods that could muddle things up enough to prevent conception, if the conditions were right? It's a weird question I just thought of and haven't had the time to research.
PS: I already know there are foods to avoid while pregnant, so DURING pregnancy isn't my concern. It's BEFORE that I'm wondering about.

I don't know if you've come into contact with any of these, but... the plants below have all been used to some extent as birth control for women. One of my coworkers is Vietnamese, & she uses megadoses of white pepper to bring on her period.

Abrus precatorius - rosary peas (it's a toxic ornamental, prevents proteins from bonding in cells, may have some use in treating cancer - which is a fast-growing cell just like a fertilized human egg)

Andrographis paniculata - 'King of Bitters' (research says it's not highly effective)

Ferula asafoetida - asafoetida (stimulant, can cause muscle spasms/contractions in large doses - some people use the foul stuff as seasoning)

Piper nigrum - common black pepper (not sure of the action on this one - seems to mainly be a stimulant to cause uterine contractions)

Plumbago spp. (P. indica, P. zeylanica, etc.) - (estrogenic activity shown useful as an oral contraceptive and abortifacient)

Gloriosa superba - Glory lily (extract is used topically to cause muscle spasms/contractions)

Mimosa pudica - sensitive plant (hey, whaddaya know, I found actual documentation that it is an effective birth control: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18061708)

Leonurus sibiricus - Motherwort (There's almost nothing out there indicating motherwort is useful as a birth control medication. But, it has been shown to reduce post-miscarriage/abortion uterine bleeding so in Ayurveda, TCM & other traditional medicine systems it's often combined w/stimulant abortifacients).