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LadyGarnetRose
05 Nov 2010, 23:34
I won't always be around have a lot of work and am quite busy but I will try to answer as quickly as possible.

magusphredde
06 Nov 2010, 18:44
I guess I will get this started ... What is with the long curls on the guys? ... I believe it is restricted to Hassidic ...

spartacandream
07 Nov 2010, 05:50
Do you believe the creation story to be true in genesis 1 and 2? Or allegory? Or how do you see it?

cesara
07 Nov 2010, 08:42
Hey LGR!! Long time no see! Good to see you here. :)

Raphaeline
08 Nov 2010, 11:42
How are converts accepted within Judaism?

Oh, and this one has been bothering me! This seems to be something everyone else knows, but I don't. I've heard references lately to "Jew" not being the politically correct term for adherents of Judaism any longer. But I don't know what's considered acceptable if that's not the case. I've been led to believe in one instance that "Jewish" is more readily acceptable (as in, "She's a Jewish.") thanks to a Community episode wherein the Jewish character says "Say the whole word!" when someone refers to her as a Jew.

What's the deal?

Shahaku
10 Nov 2010, 15:16
What is the Jewish veiw on God, as in is he humanistic or something else? I think I heard reference once to Jewish people seeing God as like a ball of light and energy or fire.

Raphaeline
10 Nov 2010, 15:21
It would seem she is busy.

Pagan_Jew
20 Nov 2010, 04:29
I have one when you get a chance to answer all the others. Its something that has been picking at my brain ever since my husband began studying Judaism. He's interested in going orthodox jewish and I was just wondering how orthodox jews see pagans. What do they believe about pagans? I want to be able to practice my own beliefs (general paganism) but I will also be following Jewish tradition as well with him. (Going to service, celebrating the holidays, observing Shabbos). <--not sure if I spelled that right.

ThorsSon
20 Nov 2010, 04:46
It would seem she is busy.

No lie... it has been so long that my circumcision has grown over.

cesara
20 Nov 2010, 07:17
LOL @ ThorsSon

When you're ready, Mindy, I would love to hear your interpretation of the Shekhinah -- a concept that absolutely intrigues me. :)

cesara
20 Nov 2010, 08:31
What is the Jewish veiw on God, as in is he humanistic or something else? I think I heard reference once to Jewish people seeing God as like a ball of light and energy or fire.


Your questions is actually what triggered me to ask about the Shekhinah because I believe it is the Shekhinah to which you are referring. So, I went and refreshed my memory and found this....

From here: http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=588&letter=S




The Shekinah as Light. The Hellenists, both Jews and Gentiles, characterized the god of the Jews as unseen, and translated the Tetragrammaton by "invisible" (ἀόρατος). In like manner Ḥag. 5b declares that "God sees, but is not seen," although http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/volume11/V11p260001.jpg was rendered by δόζα ("glory"), even in the Septuagint (Deissmann, "Hellenisirung des Semitischen Monotheismus," p. 5). According to this view, the Shekinah appeared as physical light; so that Targ. to Num. vi. 2 says, "Yhwh shall cause His Shekinah to shine for thee." A Gentile asked the patriarch Gamaliel (c. 100): "Thou sayest that wherever ten are gathered together the Shekinah appears; how many are there?" Gamaliel answered: "As the sun, which is but one of the countless servants of God, giveth light to all the world, so in a much greater degree doth the Shekinah" (Sanh. 39a). The emperor (Hadrian) said to Rabbi Joshua b. Hananiah, "I desire greatly to see thy God." Joshua requested him to stand facing the brilliant summer sun, and said, "Gaze upon it." The emperor said, "I can not." "Then," said Joshua, "if thou art not able to look upon a servant of God, how much less mayest thou gaze upon the Shekinah?"(Ḥul. 60a). Rab Sheshet (c. 300) was blind, and could not perceive when the Shekinah appeared in the Shaf we-Yatib synagogue of Nehardea, where it rested when it was not in the synagogue at Huzal. In the former synagogue Samuel and Levi heard the sound of its approach and fled (Meg. 29a). The Shekinah tinkled like a bell (Soṭah 9b), while the Holy Spirit also manifested itself to human senses in light and sound. The Holy Spirit had the form of a dove, and the Shekinah had wings. Thus he who acknowledged God took refuge under the wings of the Shekinah (Shab. 31a; Sanh. 96a); and Moses when dead lay in its pinions (Sifre, Deut. 355; Soṭah 13b; Targumic passages in Maybaum l.c. p. 65). The saints enjoy the light of the Shekinah in heaven (Ber. 17a, 64a; Shab. 30a; B. B. 10a)



So, it is the Shekhinah (the indwelling presence of YHWH but not YHWH in totality) who manifests as 'light', whereas, YHWH is known to be 'invisible' or 'unseen' -- at least on earth.

I'd love to hear more from LGR when she has a moment!

LiadanWillows
20 Nov 2010, 16:34
No lie... it has been so long that my circumcision has grown over.


:o ew

lmao

LadyGarnetRose
03 Dec 2010, 09:32
I guess I will get this started ... What is with the long curls on the guys? ... I believe it is restricted to Hassidic ...


They are called payis (side locks) they are left uncut to fulfill the commandment in Leviticus 19:27 27 Ye shall not round the corners of your heads, neither shalt thou mar the corners of thy beard.

LadyGarnetRose
03 Dec 2010, 09:36
Do you believe the creation story to be true in genesis 1 and 2? Or allegory? Or how do you see it?


Personally I see it as allegory. Many Jews do as well. Being that in the Eye of God a Day can be a 1,000 years, Yom while, dictating 1 day in the literal in the literary can be 1,000 years.

LadyGarnetRose
03 Dec 2010, 09:39
How are converts accepted within Judaism?


Yes and no. Some of the Orthodox sects that are attempting to rule Israel have attempted to make conversion all but impossible. Yet, biblically it just takes a declaration that you are now going to follow as a Jew. The entire book of Ruth basically speaks of it.



Oh, and this one has been bothering me! This seems to be something everyone else knows, but I don't. I've heard references lately to "Jew" not being the politically correct term for adherents of Judaism any longer. But I don't know what's considered acceptable if that's not the case. I've been led to believe in one instance that "Jewish" is more readily acceptable (as in, "She's a Jewish.") thanks to a Community episode wherein the Jewish character says "Say the whole word!" when someone refers to her as a Jew.
What's the deal?


On that, I'm not sure. I'm not a Jewish as Jewish is a Religion, and a Jew is an adherent to that religion. Sometimes I think people are trying too hard to be politically correct and losing a sense of language as a result.

LadyGarnetRose
03 Dec 2010, 09:43
I have one when you get a chance to answer all the others. Its something that has been picking at my brain ever since my husband began studying Judaism. He's interested in going orthodox jewish and I was just wondering how orthodox jews see pagans. What do they believe about pagans? I want to be able to practice my own beliefs (general paganism) but I will also be following Jewish tradition as well with him. (Going to service, celebrating the holidays, observing Shabbos). <--not sure if I spelled that right.


Well, if you didn't start off Jewish, and aren't trying to convert a Jew to Paganism... Jews really cannot care how you believe as long as you aren't a hypocrite while doing so and don't attempt to convert us to your faith.

LadyGarnetRose
03 Dec 2010, 09:44
Sorry it took so long to reply, November was supposed to be a quiet month and that's not what happened. I hopefully will be around a lot more now that winter is "fully" set in and there isn't as much work to do on the homestead.

Raphaeline
04 Dec 2010, 17:30
Also wanted to throw in that, in an episode of Weeds, someone asked Nancy if she's "a Jewish" and she replies, "My husband was... a Jewish..." so I'm going to look into this because this is interesting to me.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jew_(word)#Changes_in_use

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/jonah081500.asp


Something unrelated that I found interesting: http://www.jewfaq.org/gentiles.htm

cesara
04 Dec 2010, 19:30
Also wanted to throw in that, in an episode of Weeds, someone asked Nancy if she's "a Jewish" and she replies, "My husband was... a Jewish..." so I'm going to look into this because this is interesting to me.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jew_(word)#Changes_in_use

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/jonah081500.asp


Something unrelated that I found interesting: http://www.jewfaq.org/gentiles.htm


Interesting links. The second link really addresses the issue, I think, in relation to saying 'a Jewish' -- he says You drink "Turkish" coffee, but no one says "he is a Turkish." . Turkish would be considered an adjective, and, in the format you are describing, the word 'Jewish' would be an adjective, too. So, I say "She is a Jew." is correct, and "She is a Jewish." is incorrect. Maybe it was an [failed] attempt at political correctness on the part of the Weeds writers...lol.

Raphaeline
05 Dec 2010, 08:15
Interesting links. The second link really addresses the issue, I think, in relation to saying 'a Jewish' -- he says You drink "Turkish" coffee, but no one says "he is a Turkish." . Turkish would be considered an adjective, and, in the format you are describing, the word 'Jewish' would be an adjective, too. So, I say "She is a Jew." is correct, and "She is a Jewish." is incorrect. Maybe it was an [failed] attempt at political correctness on the part of the Weeds writers...lol.


Well, yeah. I know that "Jew" is a noun and "Jewish" is an adjective. But the word "Jew," regardless of the fact it's grammatically correct, has gained some negative connotations due to how it's been used in the past. "Jewish" is technically wrong to use in a sentence in that way, but it sounds less aggressive.

As an example of what I mean, when you type "Jew" into the search field at Google, this pops up: http://www.google.com/explanation.html

cesara
05 Dec 2010, 08:36
Well, yeah. I know that "Jew" is a noun and "Jewish" is an adjective. But the word "Jew," regardless of the fact it's grammatically correct, has gained some negative connotations due to how it's been used in the past. "Jewish" is technically wrong to use in a sentence in that way, but it sounds less aggressive.

As an example of what I mean, when you type "Jew" into the search field at Google, this pops up: http://www.google.com/explanation.html


Absolutely. Using the word 'Jew' can definitely be uncomfortable for some people (though, as your article says, it's making a more positive comeback), so, for those that are uncomfortable, you can still use the word Jewish in the proper context without losing meaning.

As for Weeds, clearly there are no Jewish people on the payroll there, huh? ;)

LadyGarnetRose
07 Dec 2010, 04:56
As a Jew ... I find myself angered that the PC crowd would allow those who spread hate and bigotry to take a word that is perfectly legitimate, a word we use to describe ourselves, and twist it so completely it becomes anathema.

My thoughts are, keep using it. Don't let the bigots win, and force them to use the words they used before.

thalassa
05 Aug 2011, 16:25
This isn't a question, but (since its your thread and all, feel free to comment on it LGR, lol...) I found this interesting article online @ Patheos about modesty (for men and women) in Orthodox Judaism (http://www.patheos.com/Resources/Additional-Resources/Modesty-Not-Just-for-Women?offset=2&max=1).

Hawkfeathers
05 Aug 2011, 17:22
My BFF in r/l is a Jewish guy I've known since 1982. We've learned a lot from each other, and I have a huge amount of respect for the faith, for those who observe. (Not for those who despise non-Jews, and I've had the sad experience of encountering quite a few of those. They're just like the phoney right-wing Christians who do not follow Christianity.)The greatest love of my life, so far, was also Jewish, and you could not hope to meet a nicer family than his.

Azvanna
03 Jul 2012, 03:37
Sorry if this has been asked already, I did search but did not find.

Is it true there is no Hell in Judaism? Just a place you go to that is separate from God until you have been paid for your sin, been purified and then go to be with God?

Acorn
18 Sep 2014, 09:46
Sorry if this has been asked already, I did search but did not find.

Is it true there is no Hell in Judaism? Just a place you go to that is separate from God until you have been paid for your sin, been purified and then go to be with God?

This post is quite old, but since nobody has answered it, I figure it's okay for me to give it a go, right?

It is true that there is no concept of Hell in Judaism -- nor is there a concept of Heaven, really. Judaism is heavily focused on the present and the things that are happening in this life, and specifies very little about the afterlife. In fact, some Jews, particularly Chasidim, believe in reincarnation. Though I would say, typically, mainstream Jews believe in a place where people will be reunited after death, and some take it a step further to say that only the righteous get to partake in this reunion. Orthodox and Conservative Jews also typically believe in the eventual resurrection of the dead at the coming of the messiah, though Reform Jews have largely rejected this belief.

However, long story short, I don't think that there is any form of mainstream Judaism that believes explicitly in a Hell, although there certainly are Jews who believe in one. Jewish beliefs in the afterlife are very varied, since so little is said about it in the Torah.

Gleb
24 Sep 2014, 20:38
Sorry if this has been asked already, I did search but did not find.

Is it true there is no Hell in Judaism? Just a place you go to that is separate from God until you have been paid for your sin, been purified and then go to be with God?
I'm not very drawn to Judaism, but as far as I know there is hell in Judaism. They just don't like to talk about it much.

- - - Updated - - -

That's only how I understand it.

Siloh
09 Oct 2014, 18:58
Came here to ask a question, but I guess LGR isn't around anymore?

I'll go ahead and tell y'all that hell in Judaism is basically not recognizably hell. Like there is essentially no hell. There's like a spiritual dumping ground for very special cases of terrible souls and a place of torment for the .0001% of the evilest people as I understand it. Anyway, it's like a non-issue for Jews.

Similarly, but to a lesser extent, the Jewish satan is practically unrecognizable from the Christian one. As I understand it, Lucifer for the Jews is like a partner to God who argues against our souls, because God is so all-loving that he needs someone to argue why we suck.

Which is strange, because the Old Testament God is kinda messed up much of the time...

Heka
09 Oct 2014, 19:58
As I understand it, Lucifer for the Jews is like a partner to God who argues against our souls, because God is so all-loving that he needs someone to argue why we suck.

Bahaha thats hilarious

Denarius
09 Oct 2014, 20:04
Which is strange, because the Old Testament God is kinda messed up much of the time...

Makes sense to me, love makes you crazy. I thought everyone knew that.

Torey
10 Oct 2014, 18:58
I'm surprised that I never actually really looked at this thread. I'm happy I've found it.


It is true that there is no concept of Hell in Judaism -- nor is there a concept of Heaven, really.

This is actually completely false. There is a concept of Hell within Judaism, as well as Heaven. Jewish scholars have written about both concepts exhaustively for hundreds of years.

Gehenna is what is identifiable as "Hell" within Judaism. The punishments there differ somewhat depending upon which texts you refer to. There are myths which include terrible fires as well as terrible hail and cold. There are legends of stinging scorpions which torment the unfortunate as well as a blinding, impenetrable darkness which parallels the blindness of those immersed within it to their sins.

This concept of Gehenna differs from the Christian Hell perhaps most significantly in the fact that the punishment of the condemned is not eternal. The maximum amount of time allocated for the punishment of the wicked in Gehenna is 12 months. Even on the Sabbath, the punishment subsides, so the wicked do have a reprieve from their torment.

But it is true that the concept of Hell is not one that is widely discussed or focused upon, unlike within most forms of Christianity.

MaskedOne
10 Oct 2014, 19:27
I'm surprised that I never actually really looked at this thread. I'm happy I've found it.



This is actually completely false. There is a concept of Hell within Judaism, as well as Heaven. Jewish scholars have written about both concepts exhaustively for hundreds of years.

Gehenna is what is identifiable as "Hell" within Judaism. The punishments there differ somewhat depending upon which texts you refer to. There are myths which include terrible fires as well as terrible hail and cold. There are legends of stinging scorpions which torment the unfortunate as well as a blinding, impenetrable darkness which parallels the blindness of those immersed within it to their sins.

This concept of Gehenna differs from the Christian Hell perhaps most significantly in the fact that the punishment of the condemned is not eternal. The maximum amount of time allocated for the punishment of the wicked in Gehenna is 12 months. Even on the Sabbath, the punishment subsides, so the wicked do have a reprieve from their torment.

But it is true that the concept of Hell is not one that is widely discussed or focused upon, unlike within most forms of Christianity.

That actually beats out the Zoroastrians as well. Their version of hell lasts pretty much till Armageddon at which point Ahura Mazda's endgame involves taking out his enemy, claiming and purifying all souls in hell. The usual interpretation (and the one I prefer) is that he claims them, purifies them and welcomes them into the House of Song. The more uncommon one that was hinted somewhere involves purification via destruction. I now find myself wondering where the hell (pardon the punnage), Christianity got the idea of an eternal hell from. If Jewish hell lasts a year, Zoroastrian lasts only till their God calls for an endgame, where is this eternal one coming from?

Torey
10 Oct 2014, 19:48
That actually beats out the Zoroastrians as well. Their version of hell lasts pretty much till Armageddon at which point Ahura Mazda's endgame involves taking out his enemy, claiming and purifying all souls in hell. The usual interpretation (and the one I prefer) is that he claims them, purifies them and welcomes them into the House of Song. The more uncommon one that was hinted somewhere involves purification via destruction. I now find myself wondering where the hell (pardon the punnage), Christianity got the idea of an eternal hell from. If Jewish hell lasts a year, Zoroastrian lasts only till their God calls for an endgame, where is this eternal one coming from?

The concept of an eternal "Hell" is probably, at least in regards to popularity, attributable most identifiably to Augustine of Hippo. Obviously, one can see the development of the idea over many years with borrowings from many different sources (Dante Alighieri, Plato, Greek mythology, etc.) - but Augustine was the most influential, IMHO.

MaskedOne
10 Oct 2014, 20:11
I need to hunt down the Orthodox statement on Augustine again. I like it more almost every time I hear about the man.

Siloh
13 Oct 2014, 16:10
This is actually completely false.

Harsh, but go on...


There is a concept of Hell within Judaism, as well as Heaven. Jewish scholars have written about both concepts exhaustively for hundreds of years.

These concepts are not similar in my opinion with the associations people in a majority Christian society think of as being Heaven and Hell, and many Jews believe fervently in reincarnation, which presents a whole different set of ideas on the afterlife and its progression. Regardless, I have attended Jewish institutions of every kind except modern orthodox, and I was raised ultra-orthodox, and neither Heaven nor Hell was mentioned once, although I did hear a lot of theories about reincarnation. People were more likely to talk about whether or not it was kosher to store meat and dairy dishes together that were still warm, which is a comparatively modern dilemma, as well as whether light timers are kosher on shabbos. I would say that the ideas of Heaven and Hell in Judaism are at best marginal to Jewish practice and belief and at worst somewhat esoteric to the majority of Jews. Hundreds of years ago, there was no such thing as many if not most of the rules and restrictions believers are preoccupied with today.


Gehenna is what is identifiable as "Hell" within Judaism.

Right, it's identifiable as, but it is to me so much different, and there is argument about the validity of Gehenna since there are arguments about whether the Torah is at all explicit about such an afterlife. If you do believe in Gehenna, typically you do not think of it as a place of torture and despair so much as a place of repentance and reconnection with your faith as well as of mourning (the twelve months thing has been said to reflect Kaddish and mourning cycles), and you also probably believe that everyone but the King Solomons of the world stops there on their way to Gan Eden, if you believe in Gan Eden (a sort of Jewish Heaven).


But it is true that the concept of Hell is not one that is widely discussed or focused upon, unlike within most forms of Christianity.

Right. Judaism places a major emphasis on life in the concrete world, and preoccupations with the afterlife (especially, doing things because you're worried about your post-mortem fate) are considered somewhat frivolous from my experience.

I would say that the majority of the Jewish communities with which I have lived or been involved typically think of the afterlife in a way that I would say more resembles Buddhism than Christianity (though I admittedly know very little about Buddhism), such as theories on reincarnation or the idea that every soul grows closer to God every year at exactly the same rate, becoming in a sense "enlightened"... Odd stuff, Judaism. Tangentially, there are actually a bunch of Jews out there who call themselves "BuJews"... As well as the occasional "Jewitch." :)

Larix
23 Oct 2014, 22:25
It would seem she is busy.

Latest post: 01 Mar 2012, 14:16

So I fear there will be no chances to get any questions answered any more?

MaskedOne
23 Oct 2014, 22:47
LGR was banned years ago for issues that it's not really my place to comment on (partly I dislike reopening mod calls without need and partly the ban was leveled prior to my appointment to the staff). We keep the thread open regardless because other members at various points have been able to answer questions about Judaism and having a pre-existing thread for it is convenient.

Azvanna
24 Oct 2014, 00:37
So with no Heaven and no Hell like how it is taught in Christianity, what was the structure of the spiritual world to the ancient Jew? Was there an adversary? Were there demons in the sense that Christians mean them today?

Larix
24 Oct 2014, 00:56
Were there demons in the sense that Christians mean them today?

I think there were quite a lot of demons!

Even more so than in the Christian faith.

Azvanna
24 Oct 2014, 01:24
What makes you believe so?

Torey
24 Oct 2014, 01:46
So with no Heaven and no Hell like how it is taught in Christianity, what was the structure of the spiritual world to the ancient Jew? Was there an adversary? Were there demons in the sense that Christians mean them today?

This would depend on the definition of "the ancient Jew" - or rather, to which point in the history of the Jewish people are you referring? I only refer to this query due to the fact that the Jewish people, like nearly every other cultural or religious group, have had a rich and tragic history which has changed and evolved Jewish mythology as the people experienced various other cultures and religions.

I suppose what I'm trying to say is that to speculate about what the spiritual world was like for the ancient Jew is rather difficult without directing the question to a specific point in the history of the Jewish people.


I think there were quite a lot of demons!

Even more so than in the Christian faith.

I wouldn't say that there were more, but evil spirits certainly made their appearances.

Azvanna
24 Oct 2014, 02:57
I heard today that Judaism was reconstructing itself at the same time Christianity was establishing itself. The speaker gave a date around 400CE, so I mean before then. As you might guess, I'm using this information to get a clearer picture of beliefs in place during the time that St Paul was writing his epistles and the gospel writers were writing their accounts of Jesus' life.

mathieu
12 Oct 2019, 01:25
Well the thread is pretty old, but I will still ask by curiosity.


Do you feel the jewish community as a kind of despite or hate for non jews? Like they are not human being?

Dunkeld
12 Oct 2019, 13:31
Well the thread is pretty old, but I will still ask by curiosity.


The thread may be old.
But antisemitism is still with us, I am sorry to say.

Azvanna
13 Oct 2019, 03:14
Well the thread is pretty old, but I will still ask by curiosity.


Do you feel the jewish community as a kind of despite or hate for non jews? Like they are not human being?

Is there a typo here? Do you mean:

Do you feel the Jewish community has a kind of spite or hate for non-jews? Like they (ie non-jews) are not human beings?