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LadyDorothy
06 Jul 2013, 08:34
Anybody have any good ones?

I've decided to go vegetarian soon, but I want to have some fall-back recipes first!

Hawkfeathers
06 Jul 2013, 09:48
I have tons - what sort of thing are you looking for? I never got into those tofu-based meat substitute meals much, but I used to subscribe to Vegetarian Times magazine and cut out recipies and tape them into a notebook.

LadyDorothy
06 Jul 2013, 10:54
Idk, anything really.

volcaniclastic
06 Jul 2013, 11:21
I'm vegetarian, and have a gold mine of recipes, but you'll have to wait a bit till I'm done the work day.

Hawkfeathers
06 Jul 2013, 12:01
Here's one:

Vegetarian Sierra Stew

1 cup uncooked kidney beans
2 Tbsp. Olive oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
4 large cloves garlic, minced
1 green bell pepper, seeded & coarsely chopped
1 cup coarsely chopped green cabbage
1/2 cup diced russet potatoes, unpeeled
16 oz. Can diced tomatoes (including liquid)
1 Tbsp. Chili powder (or more to taste)
½ tsp. Ground cumin
½ cup uncooked brown rice
4 cups water or vegetable broth
salt & pepper to taste
¼ cup grated pepper-jack cheese (optional)

Wash beans well, place in large bowl & cover with cold water. Let soak overnight, then drain. Rinse & set aside.
In large Dutch oven over med.-high heat, heat oil & sauté onion & garlic until soft, about 5 minutes. Add bell pepper, cabbage, potatoes, tomatoes with liquid, chili powder, & cumin. Continue cooking, stirring frequently, about 3 minutes. Add rice, water or broth, and beans. Cover & cook on low heat on stovetop for 2 hours, or in a slow cooker for 6 hours, until stew is thick and beans & rice are tender. Season w/salt & pepper. Top w/grated cheese if desired. Serves 6-8.

Per serving (approx) 360 cal., 17g protein, 7g fat, 59g carb, 0 chol, 155 mg sodium, 15g fiber

NOTES: This freezes well. I’ve used rinsed canned beans instead of starting them from scratch – just add them closer to the end of cooking time since all you are really doing is heating them up. Store-bought vegetable broth is high in sodium so I make this with water or homemade broth. It looks like a ton of work & ingredients but it’s really easy once you get started!

LadyDorothy
06 Jul 2013, 12:26
That.
Sounds.
Amazing!

I have to make it and then tell you how it is!

Heka
06 Jul 2013, 18:32
Look at any 'ethnic-y' books. They are usually vegetarian.

for good simple vegetarian recipes this book is the best in the world

http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/Meals-without-Meat-Alison-Holst/9781877246005

her main book is also amazing.

volcaniclastic
06 Jul 2013, 20:06
Here's a quick link dump:

http://www.thepescetarianandthepig.com/2013/05/06/peanut-butter-frozen-yogurt-drops/
http://www.greenchillipeppers.com/2013/04/palak-paneer.html
http://cravingchronicles.com/2013/04/02/emergency-small-batch-brownies/
http://userealbutter.com/2013/03/25/maple-miso-tofu-recipe/
http://www.culinaryadventuresinthekitchen.com/2012/03/13/quinoa-lentil-burgers-with-cilantro-hempseed-pesto/
http://relishingit.com/2012/04/13/avocado-egg-salad/
http://tastyeasyhealthygreen.com/?p=1453

Another website that's great to use to look up veggie recipes (or anything at all) is Foodgawker (http://foodgawker.com/). It shows you pictures!

Heka
06 Jul 2013, 20:36
Omfgs Anything with paneer is absolutely amazing.

Hawkfeathers
07 Jul 2013, 07:16
There some more right here in this section of the board (PF Cookbook), including another of mine I'd posted some time back, "Baked Stuffed Eggplant".

BlightWyvern
09 May 2014, 14:13
Corn Bread Sticks
You can find a cast-iron mold shaped like little ears of corn in kitchen supply shops. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.1 cup flour
1/2 cup corn meal
1/4 cup of sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1/4 cup shortening

Sift dry ingredients together, add eggs, milk, and shortening, and beat until smooth. Pour into molds and bake for 20-25 minutes

Kiya
20 May 2014, 17:07
Vegetarian curries are awesome - any of the veggies you'd normally stew will work, but some great ones are:
Sweet potato (kumara), chickpeas, lentils, mushrooms, carrots, eggplant, spinach/Asian greens, chopped, pumpkin.
Coconut cream or milk will make it creamy without dairy.
I usually use a curry base, and add additional herbs and spices - basil, coriander, star anise, turmeric and cumin. Stew for as long as you like, and serve on brown rice!
Good for clearing out the veggie drawer in the fridge, just about anything goes in.
Raw cucumber and sour greek yogurt is a nice side, particularly if you make it spicy.

Threshold
08 Jul 2014, 18:35
"Laurel's Kitchen" is a sort of classic intro to vegetarianism cook book. Simple tasty recipes and some nutrition info too.

Being vegetarian is a lot easier than most people realize. Any kind of stew, curry or casserole can be made vegetarian with no problem.

Plus there are a zillion tasty veggie things on their own.

We had awesome lentil burgers (made from scratch) for the 4th of july.

Beans and grain may make you gassy at first (keep beano and gas x on hand) but your body should get used to them after eating them for awhile.

Heka
08 Jul 2014, 19:25
Being vegetarian is a lot easier than most people realize. Any kind of stew, curry or casserole can be made vegetarian with no problem.

While this is true, I just wanted to post the caution that just taking the meat out of something does not make it a vegetarian 'meal'. Vegetarians need to be extremely careful to incorporate enough protein and iron sources in their diet. While a meatless casserole is vegetarian 'food', without replacement protein somewhere it is not a 'meal'.

Rhaethe
08 Jul 2014, 19:46
While this is true, I just wanted to post the caution that just taking the meat out of something does not make it a vegetarian 'meal'. Vegetarians need to be extremely careful to incorporate enough protein and iron sources in their diet. While a meatless casserole is vegetarian 'food', without replacement protein somewhere it is not a 'meal'.

Agreed.

I've recently shifted back into a more meatless diet (not entirely, but almost), and one of my go-to proteins is eggs. I am of the opinion that an unfertilized egg is not meat. Greek yogurt is another good one, and cottage cheese. For iron, its potatoes, dark chocolate, eggs (again) and leafy greens.

Heka
13 Jul 2014, 17:26
Agreed.

I've recently shifted back into a more meatless diet (not entirely, but almost), and one of my go-to proteins is eggs. I am of the opinion that an unfertilized egg is not meat. Greek yogurt is another good one, and cottage cheese. For iron, its potatoes, dark chocolate, eggs (again) and leafy greens.

An unfertilised egg is a period. Its fine to eat. Not huge in protein, but better than nothing. I've been eating a lot more tofu lately (highest percentage of protein per 100g) and some meat alternatives, such as 'Quorn'. I've also invested in a protein powder, because I was weight training and vegetarian protein hardly compares to meat.

thalassa
14 Jul 2014, 03:21
While this is true, I just wanted to post the caution that just taking the meat out of something does not make it a vegetarian 'meal'. Vegetarians need to be extremely careful to incorporate enough protein and iron sources in their diet. While a meatless casserole is vegetarian 'food', without replacement protein somewhere it is not a 'meal'.

Thirded.

I was a vegetarian for 8 years before I joined the Navy...I made it through boot camp and 2 months into my first deployment. Not eating meat is absolutely not the same as eating vegetarian on a nutrient and health basis.

Heka
14 Jul 2014, 03:52
Thirded.

I was a vegetarian for 8 years before I joined the Navy...I made it through boot camp and 2 months into my first deployment. Not eating meat is absolutely not the same as eating vegetarian on a nutrient and health basis.

How logn ago was that Thal? I can imagine it was difficult to be vego in the navy (my dads an ex navy chef!) But surely its gotten better? Like even supermarkets and restaurants have gotten better? Why have you not returned to being a vego?

Shahaku
14 Jul 2014, 14:50
I've seriously considered becoming vegetarian but my husband is the carnivore type. He's says he'll eat almost anything but off the top of my head he won't eat broccoli, cucumber, squash, eggplant, or artichoke and it's too hard not coming for two.

thalassa
15 Jul 2014, 03:43
How logn ago was that Thal? I can imagine it was difficult to be vego in the navy (my dads an ex navy chef!) But surely its gotten better? Like even supermarkets and restaurants have gotten better? Why have you not returned to being a vego?


About 10 year ago...if you are an officer or chief, on a larger ship its doable--they have their own stores. But for them to cook one dish for two or three people for the general enlisted crew? Not gonna happen. Sure, I could eat salad every day (on a smaller ship, which gets stores more often because it has to fuel more often), but that's no good either in the long run...and on a bigger ship, where you get stores less often (since it hold more cargo), the fresh veg is gone after about 2 weeks, leaving you with cottage cheese and canned fruit and rice.

I'm not a vegetarian anymore because I'm not fundamentally against eating meat...I never was a vegetarian for that reason anyhow. I was a vegetarian because I had/have issues with most industrial scale agriculture, including raising meat (and eggs). I have issues with land and water use for raising livestock.

But that can be "fixed" with conscious shopping. I get sausage, chicken, and eggs from a small sustainable family farm at the farmer's market, and seafood from the locally fished seafood guy at the farmer's market...heck, I even get cheese from the goat lady and the mozarella guy at the farmer's market. When friends hunt, we get deer sausage. We go crabbing... And we really don't eat much meat...maybe 2-3 meals a week.

IMO, most "vegetarian foods" that you can buy (fake burgers and the like) are just as bad as non-veg processed foods. We just try to eat as non-processed as possible. Though we have a few exceptions--the kids love ramen noodles and canned ravioli and perogies (I love perogies too), and Scott likes hot dogs (blegh). And...yeah, I'm not cooking 4 separate meals for 4 people!

Heka
15 Jul 2014, 04:53
About 10 year ago...if you are an officer or chief, on a larger ship its doable--they have their own stores. But for them to cook one dish for two or three people for the general enlisted crew? Not gonna happen. Sure, I could eat salad every day (on a smaller ship, which gets stores more often because it has to fuel more often), but that's no good either in the long run...and on a bigger ship, where you get stores less often (since it hold more cargo), the fresh veg is gone after about 2 weeks, leaving you with cottage cheese and canned fruit and rice.

I'm not a vegetarian anymore because I'm not fundamentally against eating meat...I never was a vegetarian for that reason anyhow. I was a vegetarian because I had/have issues with most industrial scale agriculture, including raising meat (and eggs). I have issues with land and water use for raising livestock.

But that can be "fixed" with conscious shopping. I get sausage, chicken, and eggs from a small sustainable family farm at the farmer's market, and seafood from the locally fished seafood guy at the farmer's market...heck, I even get cheese from the goat lady and the mozarella guy at the farmer's market. When friends hunt, we get deer sausage. We go crabbing... And we really don't eat much meat...maybe 2-3 meals a week.

IMO, most "vegetarian foods" that you can buy (fake burgers and the like) are just as bad as non-veg processed foods. We just try to eat as non-processed as possible. Though we have a few exceptions--the kids love ramen noodles and canned ravioli and perogies (I love perogies too), and Scott likes hot dogs (blegh). And...yeah, I'm not cooking 4 separate meals for 4 people!

That sounds like me. Im glad you can be ethical and use local produce and still get your meaty goodness. For now I'm happy being vegetarian. I don't really have your options. I don't know if I will ever eat meat again, but if I can get a situation like yours I may.

Jembru
09 Aug 2016, 14:40
I'm in scrimp mode at the moment because JP is between jobs. My favourite discovery is my chickpea burgers! I actually had the idea to make something similar using lentils but then I saw them make chickpea burgers on a show called 'Eat Well for Less' (BBC). On the show they mixed sweet corn with the chickpeas but I've been using whatever I find lurking in the freezer or at the back of the cupboard! Chickpeas are so cheap to buy dried and I always have some soaking because I use them in my salads for work.

My favourite burgers are to throw cooked chickpeas, lentils and chopped onions together in a blender with a bit of flour, pinch of rock salt, black pepper and chilli flakes. I form the mixture into patty shapes and grill them for about 5 minutes on each side. You could probably fry them too, although I haven't tried this yet.

I've tried different variations, including one where I added peanut butter, and so far they've all been decent. They're high in protein so are a good poor person's substitute for shop bought vegetarian burgers and so far I haven't had to buy anything in to make them. JP has a 4-week work placement coming up so we'll be stocking the cupboards back up then, but even if we didn't have that money to look forward to, it would cost less than £5 to replace the ingredients I need for the burgers, and that would keep me in burgers for weeks!

Just thought I'd share this little tip with the other veggies around here, in case you ever need to pinch the pennies but don't want to miss out on nutrition!

B. de Corbin
09 Aug 2016, 17:12
The chick peas sound good...

Medusa
09 Aug 2016, 20:00
Speaking of veggies eh....
So I'm wanting to branch out of my comfort area. I'm trying to try something new each week with my new meal plan. So this soy stuff. I've been looking at soy for beginner recipes. But anyone want to share any quick soy ideas I might try? I'm really iffy on the texture. But the thought of smothering it in sauce sounds 'ok' to me. Maybe a soy snack to get me started.

anunitu
09 Aug 2016, 20:19
Some Chinese cooking uses a lot of soy cakes..seems frying it in a wok gives it a nice texture. Only had it prepared in a restaurant,so not sure how one really cooks it like that.
My experience was from an ALL vegi restaurant in SF that was run by Buddhist monks. Must say they do vegi right...

- - - Updated - - -

Ok,found a Buddhist vegi cooking site.

Site here. (http://buddhagate.org/bgm_recipes/Vegetarian/recipes/English.html)

Jembru
09 Aug 2016, 20:32
Speaking of veggies eh....
So I'm wanting to branch out of my comfort area. I'm trying to try something new each week with my new meal plan. So this soy stuff. I've been looking at soy for beginner recipes. But anyone want to share any quick soy ideas I might try? I'm really iffy on the texture. But the thought of smothering it in sauce sounds 'ok' to me. Maybe a soy snack to get me started.


Are you using the chunks that you soak in water, or something else? I eat a lot of soy products but I don't really do anything exciting with it because I'm a lazy cook. I cut the chunks into smaller bits and add them to noodles, I chop tofu into miso soup or if I can afford the 'atsuage ' (the stuff that's fried so that it has a golden coating) or 'aburaage' (thinner version that you can use like an envelope and stuff like a sandwich -and yet the Atkins world hasn't picked up on yet!) I just eat it as a snack. I eat edamame as a snack too, or if I have the shelled beans I add them to salads. I eat natto straight from the carton (even my Japanese friends raise their eyebrows at this height of laziness and lack of creativity).

My favourite snack when I lived in Japan was kind of crisps (chips) made from soy and peas. They're now available in the uk so I'm really thrilled. They're called 'snapea' and are high in protein which is rare for that kind of snack and only 96 cals a bag. Definitely worth grabbing if you can find them in the US (if you have an oriental supermarket you'll almost certainly be able to find them, but in much bigger bags).

I guess what I'm saying is that I snack a lot more than I make proper meals...

That was a lot of brackets I'm a single post.

Medusa
10 Aug 2016, 14:22
Lol. I've never bought any. That's why I'm asking. I don't think I want the silken stuff. I'm thinking I could eat the stiff stuff. Maybe in a broth. That might be good. Something spicy to cover the bland taste.

Jembru
10 Aug 2016, 14:49
Lol. I've never bought any. That's why I'm asking. I don't think I want the silken stuff. I'm thinking I could eat the stiff stuff. Maybe in a broth. That might be good. Something spicy to cover the bland taste.

Then I definitely advise you to try the fried tofu first. I know you're watching your diet but it's not THAT bad, especially if you press it with a paper towel first to remove any excess oil. Some health food stores keep lovely flavoured varieties with herbs and spices. They're not the cheapest, but they're really tastey!

The soy chunks I mentioned are to be approached with caution. They smell and taste like pet food (don't ask how I know this). When used creatively they can work well (it's actually what is used in pot noodles to provide the 'chicken' bits), but if you're new to soy it could put you off for life!