PDA

View Full Version : Mortar and Pestle



jaidynfaith
06 Jul 2014, 17:37
Short and sweet which is better
More or less
Quantity of herbs being grinded

- - - Updated - - -

also the best way to clean after uses

Rae'ya
06 Jul 2014, 18:25
I normally use smaller quantities, mostly because I only grind what I need at the time and otherwise store whole herbs and seeds whole.

I just wipe mine out with a damp cloth between uses.

Bjorn
06 Jul 2014, 18:37
I use a tiny mortar and pestle and generally confine it to small amounts inserted separately. For example, I'll crush all my juniper berries to satisfaction before adding the lavender.

I just wipe mine out with a cloth but Rae'ya's idea of the damp cloth is probably the best way seeing as how most mortar and pestles I've seen are made of stone.

Rae'ya
06 Jul 2014, 19:48
I use a tiny mortar and pestle and generally confine it to small amounts inserted separately. For example, I'll crush all my juniper berries to satisfaction before adding the lavender.

I just wipe mine out with a cloth but Rae'ya's idea of the damp cloth is probably the best way seeing as how most mortar and pestles I've seen are made of stone.

Yeah mine is stone and the grinding surface is slightly textured, so if the cloth isn't damp than it leaves some residue behind. Is yours wood? I imagine those polished wood ones wipe out very nicely.

nbdy
07 Jul 2014, 09:40
I have two, actually, one for comestibles only.
I don't recall ever actually submerging and washing either one, but using soap and water on stone is fine (haven't seen any rocks melt in the rain lately). Setting it in direct sun will sterilize as well if you have occasion where you wish to do so.
I recommend depth, though, keeps things from popping out while you go at them.

thalassa
07 Jul 2014, 10:17
Different mortar and pestle materials have different advantages. TBH, a lot of times I use my blender, a coffee grinder, or a food processor. Even for magical stuff. The only thing I generally use an M&P for these days is stuff that isn't edible, or for magic (and even here, its more symbolic--I grind all my stuff before hand).

Smaller amounts are better to get a finer, more consistent texture. How small depends on your M&P size and material, as well as what you are working with (fresh vs dry, leaf vs root, etc), and whether you are using the M&P for grinding or pounding (which sort of M&P you use will depend on these latter things as well). I wash my ceramic M&Ps in the dishwasher, I wash my marble ones by hand, and I wipe out my wooden ones with a damp cloth before letting it dry completely (letting it dry completely is of critical importance) before storing it and then when I go to use it, I (very, very lightly) lightly oil it with an appropriate oil before using it if I am using anything at all that isn't totally dry. Also, I have a huge granite one, which I clean with uncooked white rice--basically you grind small amounts til the ground rice remains white.

Bjorn
07 Jul 2014, 12:16
Yeah mine is stone and the grinding surface is slightly textured, so if the cloth isn't damp than it leaves some residue behind. Is yours wood? I imagine those polished wood ones wipe out very nicely.

Mine is marble I think, very small and smooth.

Rae'ya
08 Jul 2014, 02:06
Setting it in direct sun will sterilize as well if you have occasion where you wish to do so.

This in not technically true in a physical sense... sunlight doesn't sterilize anything. But then I have a very clear definition of 'sterilize', based on my medical training. Sunlight will do absolutely nothing for bacteria because the heat and UV does not get up to the levels required to kill bacteria or bacterial spores.


Different mortar and pestle materials have different advantages. TBH, a lot of times I use my blender, a coffee grinder, or a food processor. Even for magical stuff. The only thing I generally use an M&P for these days is stuff that isn't edible, or for magic (and even here, its more symbolic--I grind all my stuff before hand).

I like the action of grinding with a mortar and pestle. When Torey first moved over here, he thought I was weird for using it rather than a gadget. Then I made him use it and now he's a convert. I just love the action of grinding my own herbs and spices. It's... just enjoyable. lol

Bjorn
08 Jul 2014, 02:33
I like the action of grinding with a mortar and pestle. When Torey first moved over here, he thought I was weird for using it rather than a gadget. Then I made him use it and now he's a convert. I just love the action of grinding my own herbs and spices. It's... just enjoyable. lol

I kind of need that as a part of the ritual as well. There's something therapeutic about it all (especially for me, who spends less and less time at the altar these days).

thalassa
08 Jul 2014, 02:48
I like the action of grinding with a mortar and pestle. When Torey first moved over here, he thought I was weird for using it rather than a gadget. Then I made him use it and now he's a convert. I just love the action of grinding my own herbs and spices. It's... just enjoyable. lol

I'd agree....until I developed carpal tunnel. Now its a matter of what actions I want to "waste" my wrists on. I choose crochet, back rubs, and computer games, lol!

nbdy
08 Jul 2014, 06:15
This in not technically true in a physical sense... sunlight doesn't sterilize anything. But then I have a very clear definition of 'sterilize', based on my medical training. Sunlight will do absolutely nothing for bacteria because the heat and UV does not get up to the levels required to kill bacteria or bacterial spores.


Penn State University does not agree with you. Mind you, it does not sterilize as in, "Hey, we can just do surgery in the noon day sun and it's all good," but giving a stone bowl a good bake in the sun is about as good as Lysol... without using (bleh) Lysol.
"The ultraviolet component of sunlight is the main reason microbes die in the outdoor air. The die-off rate in the outdoors varies from one pathogen to another, but can be anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes for a 90-99% kill of viruses or contagious bacteria." http://www.engr.psu.edu/iec/abe/control/ultraviolet.asp

Rae'ya
09 Jul 2014, 03:31
Penn State University does not agree with you. Mind you, it does not sterilize as in, "Hey, we can just do surgery in the noon day sun and it's all good," but giving a stone bowl a good bake in the sun is about as good as Lysol... without using (bleh) Lysol.
"The ultraviolet component of sunlight is the main reason microbes die in the outdoor air. The die-off rate in the outdoors varies from one pathogen to another, but can be anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes for a 90-99% kill of viruses or contagious bacteria." http://www.engr.psu.edu/iec/abe/control/ultraviolet.asp

You read the entire article, right? Starting with this bit...


UVGI systems typically use much more concentrated levels of ultraviolet energy than are found in sunlight. Some properly designed, and well-maintained, UVGI installations have proven highly effective, as in certain hospitals, and some studies perfomed in schools. CDC guidelines recommend the use of UVGI only with the simultaneous use of HEPA filters and high rates of purge airflow. The germicidal effects can also be species-dependent.

To sterilize something is to remove all microoganisms and pathogens (including spores). If you haven't killed EVERYTHING, it's not sterilized. Normal sunlight does not have the temperature not the UV levels to actually sterilize something, which is conceded in the article you linked.

Also... Lysol doesn't sterilize a thing. It's a disinfectant. Disinfecting is quite different to sterilizing.