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Thread: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

  1. #11
    Honorary Supporter Dez's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    Hooray...I'm finally on long enough to respond to this! I've been wanting to for days, but things have been nuts

    Over the course of the past year, I have experienced a strong pull to the Norse gods, and have written about it here and there. Without it, I don't think I could have finally let go of some of the more gripping and painful (at least for me) aspects of my former faith. The Aesir aren't really interested in me at this point in things, though. I'm fairly sure it's a personality thing, as much as anything. Over the course of this journey, though, my husband hasn't really been interested in finding another faith. He's always leaned agnostic, and given his long-term interest in Japanese culture we both figured that he'd probably lean Buddhist...it spoke to him a very long time ago.

    A couple of months ago, though, he was approached by Odin. In a very real way that even my logical, pragmatic husband has just run with. In his words, his relationship is like a chess game between an old experienced player and a young but smart one. Odin challenges him, but as long as my husband is willing to rise to the test, take nothing for granted, and show the courage to question what he's handed, things go well for him. Don't accept what seems like a freebie, unless you know what he wants in return, and if you want something from him, stick to your guns.

    On other places on the internet, I've run into people like the website you've mentioned, and you know what? I'm more then a little suspicious that people of the "Odin picks on me" variety 1) don't have the intestinal fortitude to go after what they really want, whether he'll help or not, and 2) blame him for every little thing that goes wrong in their lives. I doubt he'd take kindly to either stance. Based on what I'm seeing change for the better in L's life right now, totally out of left field, he is a god who makes you step up your game, and take personal responsibility. No whining. If don't have the chutzpa to be gregarious about it, it could get interesting.

    I hope that helps.

  2. #12
    Sr. Member Gunnarr's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    Its more in line with your ancestors calling. The elevation to god like status is very much human attribute. Our ancient ancestor knows his decendents venerate him though for his deeds.
    Gunnarr Sandisson
    "A man should look for what is, and not for what he thinks should be." Albert Einstein
    Five Boroughs Hearth

  3. #13
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    [QUOTE=Thjoth;48877

    As for being "chosen" before you were Pagan, I actually agree that that could (and probably normally does) happen. I remember when I went from being a Christian to being Pagan, it was like a mask was pulled off of the "presence" I had always attributed to Yahweh and it was revealed to really be Tyr.[/QUOTE]

    Holy crap, reading this was like a light going on. I've been worrying recently about real experiences I had as a Christian that would be difficult to simply ignore as a Pagan. Thank you very much for that....

    (Sorry about the derail.)

  4. #14
    Sr. Member Ravenix's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    It's perfectly possible that he made himself known to you beforehand. I don't personally follow Woden (as I call him) exclusively, I show him a hell of a lot of respect though. Frea made herself known to me when I was Wiccan however, but I didn't know it at the time. I was having a panic attack when I was by myself at home, and a beautiful young woman appeared to me. The most vivid thing I remember about her was a) her beauty and b) her white arms. Oh, and she was naked. Later on I found a piece of writing that described her as 'something between a lusty giantess and a fair maiden whose white arms light up the darkness of the underworld' (from The Lost Beliefs of Northern Europe). She's also often described as the 'most beautiful and desirable of white-armed women'. Now she's my patron.
    "The Germans do not think it in keeping with the divine majesty to confine gods within walls or to portray them in the likeness of any human countenance. Their holy places are woods and groves, and they apply the names of deities to that hidden presence which is seen only by the eye of reverence." (Tacitus, `Germania', 9)

  5. #15
    Lyfing
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    [QUOTE=Treefingers;48718]
    I guess what I'm trying to say is that I'm afraid that I've somehow become one of Odin's followers without even trying and that he is testing me. Maybe he wants me to learn from my trials. I quote: "He has, perhaps, one gift to give and that is the gift of hardship, of challenge. Perform, he says, or die." I'm not so sure I want THAT gift.
    QUOTE]

    I know what you mean..

    This is a little something I put together a while ago..

    Starkad..

    Starkad is my favorite Hero..

    H.M. Chadwick said of him..

    “If I am not mistaken, he was regarded in early times as the typical worshipper of Othin.”..

    Why was he regarded as a typical worshipper of Odin..??

    My answer would be that it was because he lived a Grim life that only Grimnir could have touched..

    It is all told us in Gautrek's Saga..

    7. THE GODS IN JUDGMENT

    King Vikar became a great war leader and had with him a number of outstanding warriors, but Starkad was the most highly-regarded of them all and the one best loved by the king; he sat next to him on the high-seat, acted as his counsellor and was in charge of the defences. King Vikar had given him a good many striking gifts, one of them a gold bracelet weighing three marks. In return, Starkad gave the king Thruma Island, which King Harald had once given to Storvirk, Starkad's father. He was with King Vikar for fifteen years.

    King Vikar set out from Agder and sailed north to Hordaland with a large army. Then he ran into unfavourable winds and had to lie at anchor off a certain group of small islands. They tried by means of divination to find out when the wind would be favourable and were told that Odin expected a human sacrifice from the army, the victim to be chosen by lot. So they drew lots throughout the army and every time, King Vikar's lot came up. They were all very shaken by this, and it was decided that all their leading men should have a meeting the following day to consider the problem.

    Then just about midnight, Grani Horse-hair woke up his foster-son Starkad and asked him to come along with him. They got a small boat and rowed over to another island. They walked through a wood until they came to a clearing where a large number of people were attending a meeting. There were eleven men sitting on chairs but a twelfth chair was empty. Starkad and his foster-father joined the assembly, and Grani Horse-hair seated himself on the twelfth chair. Everyone present greeted him by the name Odin, and he said that the judges would now have to decide on Starkad's fate.

    Then Thor spoke up and said: 'Starkad's mother, Alfhild, preferred a brainy giant to Thor himself as the father of her son. So I ordain that Starkad himself shall have neither a son nor a daughter, and his family will end with him.'

    Odin: 'I ordain that he shall live for three life spans.'

    Thor: 'He shall commit a most foul deed in every one of them.'

    Odin: 'I ordain that he shall have the best in weapons and clothing.'

    Thor: 'I ordain that he shall have neither land nor estates.'

    Odin: 'I give him this, that he shall vast sums of money.'

    Thor: 'I lay this curse on him, that he shall never be satisfied with what he has.'

    Odin: 'I give him victory and fame in every battle.'

    Thor: 'I lay this curse on him, that in every battle he shall be sorely wounded.'

    Odin: 'I give him the art of poetry, so that he shall compose verses as fast as he can speak.'

    Thor: 'He shall never remember afterwards what he composes.'

    Odin: 'I ordain that he shall be most highly thought of by all the noblest people and the best.'

    Thor: 'The common people shall hate him every one.'

    Then the judges decreed that all that had been said should happen to Starkad. The assembly broke up, and Grani Horse-hair and Starkad went back to their boat.

    'You should repay me well, my foster-son,' said Grani Horse-hair to Starkad, 'for all the help I've given you.'

    'That I will,' said Starkad.

    'Then you're to send King Vikar to me,' said Grani Horse-hair. 'I'll tell you how to go about it.'

    Starkad agreed, and Grani Horse-hair gave him a spear which he said would seem to be only a reed stalk. Then they joined the rest of the army, just a little before daybreak.

    In the morning the king's councillors held a meeting to discuss their plans. They agreed that they would have to hold a mock sacrifice, and Starkad told them how to set about it. There was a pine tree nearby and close to it a tall tree trunk. The pine tree had a slender branch just above the ground, but stretching up into the foliage. Just then the servants were making breakfast. A calf had been slaughtered and its entrails cleaned out. Starkad asked for the guts, then climbed up the trunk, bent down the slender branch and tied the calf guts around it.

    'Your gallows is ready for you now, my lord,' he said to King Vikar, 'and it doesn't seem all
    that dangerous. So come over here and I'll put a noose round your neck.'

    'If this contraption isn't any more dangerous than it looks,' said the king, 'then it can't do me much harm. But if things turn out otherwise, it's a matter for fate to decide.'

    After that he climbed up the stump. Starkad put the noose round his neck and climbed down. Next Starkad stabbed at the king with the reed stalk and said, 'Now I give you to Odin.'

    Then Starkad let the branch loose. The reed stalk turned into a spear which went straight through the king, the tree stump slipped from under his feet, the calf guts turned into a strong withy, the branch shot up with the king into the foliage and there he died. Ever since, that place has been known as Vikarsholmar.

    This business made Starkad hated by all the common people, and because of it he was first banished from Hordaland, and later had to flee from Norway east to Sweden. He stayed for a long time at Uppsala with the kings there, Eirik and Alrek (the sons of Agni Skjalf's husband), and took part in viking expeditions with them. When Alrek asked Starkad what he could tell him about his kinsmen or himself, Starkad composed the poem called Vikar's Piece in which he described how King Vikar died.

    'I fought with the greatest king of them all, and those were the happiest years of my life. Then we went on out ill-starred and last trip to Hordaland.

    'It was then Thor ordained that I should become a traitor and suffer other misfortunes. I was forced to commit wicked, infamous deeds.

    'I was made to dedicate Vikar (the killer of Geirthjof) to the gods high up in the tree. I thrust with a spear into the king's heart: no act of mine has brought me such pain.'

    'From there I wandered about unhappily and aimlessly---the people of Hordaland hated me---a man with no gold and no songs, a kingless man with his fill of sorrow.

    'Then I drifted across to Sweden, to the Yngling Kings at Uppsala. I shall long remember how indifferently I've been treated by those royal retainers.'

    It's quite obvious from Starkad's poem that he thought his killing of Vikar the most wicked and hateful thing he ever did. We've never heard any stories to indicate that Starkad ever returned to Norway again.

    While Starkad was at Uppsala, twelve berserks were also there as mercenaries. They were extremely aggressive and used to make fun of him, particularly two brothers called Ulf and Otrygg. Starkad was very taciturn and the berserks said he was a reborn giant as well as a traitor; as it is said here:

    'They placed me among the warriors---a white-browed mocked old man. These men, unsparing in their cruelty, have made me their laughing-stock and ridicule me.

    'They claim they can see on me the Killer of Hergrim, the monstrous scars which show the traces of eight arms torn off by Thor, north of the cliffs.

    'People laugh when they see me; the ugly jaws, the long snout-shaped mouth, the wolf-grey hair and the tree-like arms, the bruised rough-skinned neck.'

    When King Eirik and Alrek settled down, Starkad went on plundering expeditions with the ship that King Eirik had given him, manned with Norwegians and Danes. He travelled widely, fought duels and battles in many lands, and always won. And so Starkad is out of our story.

    King Alrek didn't live very long, and this is the way he died---his brother, King Eirik, struck him dead with a bridle when they had gone out to train their horses. After that King Eirik was the sole ruler of Sweden for a long time, as will be told elsewhere in Hrolf Gautreksson's Saga.

    http://aj69.tripod.com/ancestry/gautreksaga.html

    That is just Odin's Way. The Way to Valhalla. Starkad repayed Grani Horse-Hair's Help even with Thor's Curses..?? He sent King Vikar to Valhalla, he did it like Odin showed him, and he lived a life like Odin. If such seems your life then maybe that is where you are headed..?? But, more presently, what you have to deal with, with all it's blessings and curses..

    http://www.einherjarhearth.org/starkad.html

    Later,
    -Lyfing

  6. #16
    Member Taliesyn's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    I have always seen Odin standing in the trees looking at me- though i didnt always accecpt that it was him. his face hidden, for years it was "grow up, boy" that i heard. I tried to be valliant- portecting those that i felt needed it (even if it wasnt what they deserved) and i have the scars for that. I wanted to seek for esoteric knowledge, to walk with one foot in the spirit world- but for me to do that, i needed to sacrifice part of the mundane world.
    I have never refused aid to a stranger, because when i was about five, i read the story of how Odin masqueraded as an old feeble man leaning on a stick and was insulted by a yound warrior (if any of you more litterate heathens want ot point out that story's name or content, i'd appreciate it ) - it's actually one of that things that showed me that my new wife was perfect for me- she always gives money to vagrants for the same reason.
    Has it always been easy? nope. I can hear the Old Man laughing every time I commit to something ridiclous- cause HE knows, even if i don't what it is that he requires. and i think it is this:

    Stand up . be honest. pay whatever consequence even your life, for what you belive, truly belive, to be important. and as you pay that price, revel in it. laugh. don't be the miser, complaining you sold your eye for Ominiscience, but laugh merilly at the bargin! be lusty. be honorable. Be the most complete, no regretful you you can be. oh- and hang some mead in a tree. He seems to like that.

    (i would like to say, Astaru, that if my tone offends, I say all this with the utmost respect and reverence. Hail Odin.)

  7. #17
    Honorary Supporter Dez's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    Taliesyn, I'm pretty sure you're thinking of Grimnismal, in the Poetic Edda. The All-Father and the Queen of the Aesir rescue and raise two sons of a king, returning them to society after a couple of years. When they grow up, Odin disguises himself and Grimnir, the wanderer, to prove that the eldest is hospitable. Frigg stacks the cards against him by sending a messenger to the court who says a black wizard is coming.

    Instead of just turning him away, he's tortured and mocked, staked between two fires without food or water for days. The king's son disagrees with this, and brings him drink, disobeying his father's direct command. At that point, Odin removes his disguise, strikes down the king and the warriors who participate, and makes the son king in his place.

    ...sound about right?

  8. #18
    Member Taliesyn's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    not exactly as I remember it but I think so, Dez. It was in a childern's book about Norse legends- I think they had altered it. I wasn't five either- more like 3rd grade. so 8 years old or so. I guess I had it a bit mangled, but Thank you for pointing it out- I'll go and read the original, maybe if work is slow tonight.
    Last edited by Taliesyn; 28 Feb 2012 at 09:25. Reason: corrections and ramblings

  9. #19
    Honorary Supporter Dez's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    They really mess with some of the myths when they're "tweaked" for kids...I'm not surprised. I'm interested in if I remembered right, though...let me know!

  10. #20
    Member Taliesyn's Avatar
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    Re: I think Odin chose me before I was Pagan

    well I read the Grimnsol on my break last night- and though it didnt read like hte story i remember, I am pretty sure that is where it came from. Thanks Dez.

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